Manganese in Soils and Plants

Proceedings of the International Symposium on 'Manganese in Soils and Plants' held at the Waite Agricultural Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, South Australia, August 22–26, 1988 as an Australian Bicentennial ...

Author: R.D. Graham

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400928176

Category: Science

Page: 344

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Sixty years ago at the Waite Agricultural Research Institute, G. Samuel, a plant pathologist, and C. S. Piper, a chemist, published their conclusion that the cause of roadside take-all, a disease of oats, was manganese deficiency. This report, together with the concurrent and independent studies of W. M. Carne in Western Australia were the first records of manganese deficiency in Australia and came only six years after McHargue's paper which is generally accepted as the final proof of the essentiality of this element. There must have been a few doubts for some people at the time, however, as the CAB publication, 'The Minor Elements of the Soil' (1940) expressed the view that further evidence to this effect was provided by Samuel and Piper. Their historic contributions are recognised by the International Symposium on Manganese in Soils and Plants as it meets on the site of their early labours to celebrate the 60th anniversary. This year Australians also acknowledge 200 years of European settlement in this country and so the Symposium is both a Bicentennial and a diamond jubilee event which recognises the impact of trace elements on agricultural development in Australia. In a broader sense, a symposium such as this celebrates, as it reviews, the efforts of all who over the ages have contributed to our knowledge of manganese in soils and plants.
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Micronutrient Deficiency in Soils and Plants

The biology of manganese transforming microorganisms in soil. In: Graham RD, Hannam RJ, Uren NC, Eds 'Manganese in soils and plants', Proceedings of the International symposium on 'Manganese in soils and plants'.

Author: Theocharis Chatzistathis

Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers

ISBN: 9781608059348

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 212

View: 261

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Micronutrient Deficiency in Soils and Plants highlights the problems caused by micronutrient deficiencies in vegetative production. This eBook emphasizes on the necessary requirements for plant growth micronutrients, the vital deficiency symptoms of micronutrients and their crucial role in plant metabolism. The scope of this eBook covers a range of topics including micronutrient deficiency, the availability of micronutrient in soils, plant metabolism and micronutrient solubility. The contents of this eBook include chapters on micronutrient solubility and availability in soils, the role of micronutrients in plant metabolism and growth and diagnostic tools to assess deficiencies of iron, zinc, copper and other micro-nutrients. Micronutrient Deficiency in Soils and Plants is a valuable resource for MSc and PhD students, academic personnel and researchers seeking updated and critically important information on major nutritional problems in agricultural soils and crops.
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Soil Analysis

On the other hand, research on seasonal changes in the Vfn status of soils and plants requires a thorough understanding of the behaviour of Mn in soils. In view of the discussion above, it is not possible to set a single soil test to ...

Author: K. I. Peverill

Publisher: CSIRO PUBLISHING

ISBN: 9780643063761

Category: Science

Page: 427

View: 299

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A practical guide to soil tests for Australian soils and conditions.
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Iron Nutrition in Soils and Plants

An excess of Mn applied over that of FeBDDHA in the soil overcame much of the inhibition of Mn uptake by peanut plants. This has been also found in soybean plants (Wallace and Alexander, 1973). We observed an increase of soil-available ...

Author: Javier Abadía

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401105033

Category: Science

Page: 401

View: 298

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Iron is a major constituent of the earth crust. However, under alkaline conditions commonly found in arid and semi-arid environments iron becomes unavailable to plants. When plants are affected by a shortage of iron their leaves become yellow (chlorotic), and both plant growth and crop yield are reduced. The roots of plants affected by iron deficiency may develop a series of responses directed to improve iron uptake, such as increased proton excretion and iron reduction capabilities or excretion of iron chela tors called siderophores. Iron deficiency affects major crops worldwide, including some of major economic importance such as fruit trees and others. Correction of iron deficiency is usually implemented through costly application of synthetic chelates. Since these correction methods are very expensive, the competitivity of farmers is often reduced and iron deficiency may become a limiting factor for the maintenance, introduction or expansion of some crops. In spite of the many years devoted to the study of iron deficiency, the knowledge of iron deficiency in soils and plants is still fragmentary in many aspects. We have only incomplete information on the processes at the molecular level that make some plant species and cultivars unable to take and utilize iron from the soil, whereas other plants grow satisfactorily under the same conditions.
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Manganese in Soils and Plants

In a broader sense, a symposium such as this celebrates, as it reviews, the efforts of all who over the ages have contributed to our knowledge of manganese in soils and plants.

Author: R.D. Graham

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401077681

Category: Science

Page: 344

View: 638

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Sixty years ago at the Waite Agricultural Research Institute, G. Samuel, a plant pathologist, and C. S. Piper, a chemist, published their conclusion that the cause of roadside take-all, a disease of oats, was manganese deficiency. This report, together with the concurrent and independent studies of W. M. Carne in Western Australia were the first records of manganese deficiency in Australia and came only six years after McHargue's paper which is generally accepted as the final proof of the essentiality of this element. There must have been a few doubts for some people at the time, however, as the CAB publication, 'The Minor Elements of the Soil' (1940) expressed the view that further evidence to this effect was provided by Samuel and Piper. Their historic contributions are recognised by the International Symposium on Manganese in Soils and Plants as it meets on the site of their early labours to celebrate the 60th anniversary. This year Australians also acknowledge 200 years of European settlement in this country and so the Symposium is both a Bicentennial and a diamond jubilee event which recognises the impact of trace elements on agricultural development in Australia. In a broader sense, a symposium such as this celebrates, as it reviews, the efforts of all who over the ages have contributed to our knowledge of manganese in soils and plants.
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The Function and Distribution of Manganese in Plants and Soils

the oxidations of the soil , " no doubt have an important bearing on this question ; but , as Bernardini pointed out , it has not been shown in field experiments that manganese does not react indirectly on other constituents of the soil ...

Author: Walter Pearson Kelley

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105130125680

Category: Manganese

Page: 56

View: 430

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Zinc in Soils and Plants

McCarthy KW, Longnecker NE, Sparrow D H B and Graham RD 1988 Inheritance of manganese efficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). In International Symposium on Manganese in Soils and Plants: Contributed Papers. Eds. MJ Webb, R O Nable, ...

Author: A.D. Robson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401108782

Category: Science

Page: 208

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Proceedings of the International Symposium on `Zinc in Soils and Plants', held at The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, 27--28 September 1993
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Trace Elements in Soils and Plants

Treyman, A. A., Copper and manganese in soils, plants and waters of Salair Mountain-Ridge and Prisalair Plain, in Copper, Manganese and Boron in Landscapes of Baraba Depression and the Novosibirsk Region, Ilyin, W. B., Ed., Izd. Nauka, ...

Author: Alina Kabata-Pendias

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781420039900

Category: Science

Page: 433

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Contemporary legislation respecting environmental protection and public health, at both national and international levels, are based on data that characterize chemical properties of environmental phenomena, especially those that reside in our food chain. Thus, environmental and food quality are now matters of major public concern and therefore a sy
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Handbook of Plant Nutrition

The acquisition of phosphorus by Lupinus albus L. Plant Soil 68:19–32. Garnham, G.W., G.A. Codd, and G.M. Gadd. 1992. Kinetics of uptake and intracellular location of cobalt, manganese and zinc in the estuarine green alga, ...

Author: Allen V. Barker

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781439881989

Category: Science

Page: 773

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In 2007, the first edition of Handbook of Plant Nutrition presented a compendium of information on the mineral nutrition of plants available at that time-and became a bestseller and trusted resource. Updated to reflect recent advances in knowledge of plant nutrition, the second edition continues this tradition. With chapters written by a new team o
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