Memorial Candles Children of the Holocaust

The book combines verbatim transcriptions of dialogues in individual and group psychotherapy sessions with analyses of dreams, fantasies and childhood memories.

Author: Dina Wardi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317799559

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

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As the children of the Holocaust reach adulthood, they often need professional help in establishing a new identity and self-esteem. During their childhood their parents have unconsciously transmitted to them much of their own trauma, investing them with all their memories and hopes, so that they become 'memorial candles' to those who did not survive. The book combines verbatim transcriptions of dialogues in individual and group psychotherapy sessions with analyses of dreams, fantasies and childhood memories. Diana Wardi traces the emotional history of her patients, accompanying them on a painful and moving journey into their inner world. She describes the children's infancy in the guilt-laden atmosphere of survivor families, through to their difficult separation from their parents in maturity. she also traces in detail the therapeutic process which culminates in the patients' separation from the role of 'memorial candle'.
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Surviving the Angel of Death

In this incredible true story written for young adults, readers learn of a child's endurance and survival in the face of truly extraordinary evil and Eva's recovery and her controversial but often misunderstood decision to publicly forgive ...

Author: Eva Mozes Kor

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781939100528

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 192

View: 542

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Eva Mozes Kor was just ten years old when she arrived in Auschwitz. While her parents and two older sisters were taken to the gas chambers, she and her twin, Miriam, were herded into the care of the man known as the Angel of Death, Dr. Josef Mengele. Subjected to sadistic medical experiments, she was forced to fight daily for her and her twin's survival. In this incredible true story written for young adults, readers learn of a child's endurance and survival in the face of truly extraordinary evil and Eva's recovery and her controversial but often misunderstood decision to publicly forgive the Nazis. Readers will learn of how she triumphed over unfathomable pain and suffering into a life-long work for peace, human rights, and Holocaust education. The new edition provides interesting details and important context to the events related in the original story. A new Afterword by publisher Peggy Porter Tierney offers a richer portrayal of Eva as a person, the truth behind the controversies, and the eventful last ten years of her life.
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One Candle

For one family the traditional Hanukkah celebration has a deeper meaning.

Author: Eve Bunting

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780060085605

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 40

View: 490

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For one family the traditional Hanukkah celebration has a deeper meaning. Amidst the food and the festivities, Grandma and Great-Aunt Rose begin their story -- the one they tell each year. They pass on to each generation a tale of perseverance during the darkest hours of the Holocaust, and the strength it took to continue to honor Hanukkah in the only way they could. Their story reaffirms the values of tradition and family, but also shows us that by continuing to honor the tragedies and the triumphs of the past there will always be hope for the future.
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French Children of the Holocaust

Presents a black and white photograph and biographical paragraph for each of the 2,500 who died

Author: Serge Klarsfeld

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814726623

Category: History

Page: 1881

View: 366

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Presents a black and white photograph and biographical paragraph for each of the 2,500 who died
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A Wolf in the Attic

Later, her father, who escaped from a concentration camp, found them and hid in their attic until the liberation. The story of the miraculous survival of this Jewish family is only the beginning of their long journey out of the Holocaust.

Author: Sophia Richman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136400070

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 510

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A Wolf in the Attic: Even though she was only two, the little girl knew she must never go into the attic. Strange noises came from there. Mama said there was a wolf upstairs, a hungry, dangerous wolf . . . but the truth was far more dangerous than that. Much too dangerous to tell a Jewish child marked for death. One cannot mourn what one doesn’t acknowledge, and one cannot heal if one does not mourn . . . A Wolf in the Attic is a powerful memoir written by a psychoanalyst who was a hidden child in Poland during World War II. Her story, in addition to its immediate impact, illustrates her struggle to come to terms with the powerful yet sometimes subtle impact of childhood trauma. In the author's words: “As a very young child I experienced the Holocaust in a way that made it almost impossible to integrate and make sense of the experience. For me, there was no life before the war, no secure early childhood to hold in mind, no context in which to place what was happening to me and around me. The Holocaust was in the air that I breathed daily for the first four years of my life. I took it in deeply without awareness or critical judgment. I ingested it with the milk I drank from my mother’s breast. It had the taste of fear and despair.” Born during the Holocaust in what was once a part of Poland, Sophia Richman spent her early years in hiding in a small village near Lwów, the city where she was born. Hidden in plain sight, both she and her mother passed as Christian Poles. Later, her father, who escaped from a concentration camp, found them and hid in their attic until the liberation. The story of the miraculous survival of this Jewish family is only the beginning of their long journey out of the Holocaust. The war years are followed by migration and displacement as the refugees search for a new homeland. They move from Ukraine to Poland to France and eventually settle in America. A Wolf in the Attic traces the effects of the author’s experiences on her role as an American teen, a wife, a mother, and eventually, a psychoanalyst. A Wolf in the Attic explores the impact of early childhood trauma on the author’s: education career choices attitudes toward therapy, both as patient and therapist social interactions love/family relationships parenting style and decisions regarding her daughter religious orientation Repeatedly told by her parents that she was too young to remember the war years, Sophia spent much of her life trying to ”remember to forget” what she did indeed remember. A Wolf in the Attic follows her life as she gradually becomes able to reclaim her past, to understand its impact on her life and the choices she has made, and finally, to heal a part of herself that she had been so long taught to deny.
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Abnormal Behavior in the 21st Century Three Volumes

Memorial candles: Children of the Holocaust. London: Routledge. 82. Vogel, M. L. (1994). Gender as a factor in the transgenerational transmission of trauma. Women and Therapy, 15, 35–47. 83. Volkan, V. D. (1981).

Author: Thomas G. Plante

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313054594

Category: Mental illness

Page:

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Auschwitz

"Dina Wardi, an Israeli Jewish psychologist noted for her work with Holocaust survivors and their children, has written an account of her experiences leading a multinational group of Catholic nuns and priests during a conference on anti ...

Author: Dina Wardi

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 0809141965

Category: History

Page: 159

View: 611

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"Dina Wardi, an Israeli Jewish psychologist noted for her work with Holocaust survivors and their children, has written an account of her experiences leading a multinational group of Catholic nuns and priests during a conference on anti-Semitism, persecutions, and the Holocaust, which included visits to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. The result is a dynamic portrayal of a trip to this most sacred place that has profoundly affected the lives and mission of all involved." "Auschwitz is an important study of the Jewish-Christian dialogue regarding Christian Holocaust guilt, anti-Semitism in the Catholic Church, and ecumenism."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Third Generation Holocaust Narratives

The image of the rattled, Holocaust-obsessed survivor's child corresponds to the “memorial candles” discussed by Dina Wardi in Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust. She writes that in most survivors' families one child is ...

Author: Victoria Aarons

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498517171

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 938

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This collection introduces the reader to third-generation Holocaust narratives, exploring the unique perspective of third-generation writers and demonstrating the ways in which Holocaust memory and trauma extend into the future.
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Daughters of Absence

Collects essays written by daughters of Holocaust survivors about the influence of the Holocaust on their lives and work as artists, poets, photographers, actresses, musicians, and filmmakers.

Author: Mindy Weisel

Publisher: Capital Books Incorporated

ISBN: 1892123371

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 790

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Collects essays written by daughters of Holocaust survivors about the influence of the Holocaust on their lives and work as artists, poets, photographers, actresses, musicians, and filmmakers.
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Reckonings

Alan L. Berger and Naomi Berger, eds., Second Generation Voices: Reflections by Children of Holocaust Survivors and Perpetrators (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse ... Dina Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust (London: Routledge, ...

Author: Mary Fulbrook

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190681265

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 672

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A single word--"Auschwitz"--is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes. Mary Fulbrook's encompassing book explores the lives of individuals across a full spectrum of suffering and guilt, each one capturing one small part of the greater story. Using "reckoning" in the widest possible sense to evoke how the consequences of violence have expanded almost infinitely through time, from early brutality through programs to euthanize the sick and infirm in the 1930s to the full functioning of the death camps in the early 1940s, and across the post-war decades of selective confrontation with perpetrators and ever-expanding commemoration of victims, Fulbrook exposes the disjuncture between official myths about "dealing with the past" and the extent to which the vast majority of Nazi perpetrators evaded responsibility. In the successor states to the Third Reich -- East Germany, West Germany, and Austria -- prosecution varied widely. Communist East Germany pursued Nazi criminals and handed down severe sentences; West Germany, caught between facing up to the past and seeking to draw a line under it, tended toward selective justice and reintegration of former Nazis; and Austria made nearly no reckoning at all until the mid-1980s, when news broke about Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim's past. The continuing battle with the legacies of Nazism in the private sphere was often at odds with public remembrance and memorials. Following the various phases of trials and testimonies, from those immediately after the war to those that stretched into the decades following, Reckonings illuminates shifting public attitudes toward both perpetrators and survivors, and recalibrates anew the scales of justice.
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Holocaust Memory Reframed

Often playing a symbolic role in Holocaust museum exhibits, candles are essential to both Moshe Safdie's Children's Memorial at Yad Vashem and Michael Bielicky's video sculpture Menora, located at the entrance to the Memory Void in the ...

Author: Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813565255

Category: Art

Page: 280

View: 988

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Holocaust memorials and museums face a difficult task as their staffs strive to commemorate and document horror. On the one hand, the events museums represent are beyond most people’s experiences. At the same time they are often portrayed by theologians, artists, and philosophers in ways that are already known by the public. Museum administrators and curators have the challenging role of finding a creative way to present Holocaust exhibits to avoid clichéd or dehumanizing portrayals of victims and their suffering. In Holocaust Memory Reframed, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich examines representations in three museums: Israel’s Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Germany’s Jewish Museum in Berlin, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. She describes a variety of visually striking media, including architecture, photography exhibits, artifact displays, and video installations in order to explain the aesthetic techniques that the museums employ. As she interprets the exhibits, Hansen-Glucklich clarifies how museums communicate Holocaust narratives within the historical and cultural contexts specific to Germany, Israel, and the United States. In Yad Vashem, architect Moshe Safdie developed a narrative suited for Israel, rooted in a redemptive, Zionist story of homecoming to a place of mythic geography and renewal, in contrast to death and suffering in exile. In the Jewish Museum in Berlin, Daniel Libeskind’s architecture, broken lines, and voids emphasize absence. Here exhibits communicate a conflicted ideology, torn between the loss of a Jewish past and the country’s current multicultural ethos. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum presents yet another lens, conveying through its exhibits a sense of sacrifice that is part of the civil values of American democracy, and trying to overcome geographic and temporal distance. One well-know example, the pile of thousands of shoes plundered from concentration camp victims encourages the visitor to bridge the gap between viewer and victim. Hansen-Glucklich explores how each museum’s concept of the sacred shapes the design and choreography of visitors’ experiences within museum spaces. These spaces are sites of pilgrimage that can in turn lead to rites of passage.
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Sexual Violence Against Jewish Women During the Holocaust

Dina Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust, trans. Naomi Goldblum (London: Tavistock/Routledge, 1992), 9. 30. Charlotte Dorowin-Zeissl, interview IKF-Rav-Inter. 21_1, 9, conducted by Hemma Mayerhofer on January 14, 1999.

Author: Sonja Maria Hedgepeth

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584659044

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

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The first book in English to specifically address the sexual violation of Jewish women during the Holocaust
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The Politics of War Memory and Commemoration

See among others: D. Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust, trans. N. Goldblum (London and New York, 1992); H. Epstein, Children of the Holocaust: Conversations with Sons and Daughters of Survivors (London, 1988, c.

Author: T.G. Ashplant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134696574

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 192

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War memory and commemoration have had increasingly high profiles in public and academic debates in recent years. This volume examines some of the social changes which have led to this development, among them the passing of the two World Wars from survivor into cultural memory. Focusing on the politics of war memory and commemoration, the book illuminates the struggle to install particular memories at the centre of a cultural world, and offers an extensive argument about how the politics of commemoration practices should be understood.
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The Holocaust of Texts

See Wardi's contextualization of her study in her introduction for a brief description of this debate as well as her place within it (Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust, tr. Naomi Goldblum [New York: Routledge, ...

Author: Amy Hungerford

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226360768

Category: History

Page: 206

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"Examines the implications of conflating texts with people in a broad range of texts: Art Spiegelman's Maus, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, the poetry of Sylvia Plath, Binjamin Wilkomirski's fake Holocaust memoir Fragments, and the fiction of Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, and Don Delillo."--Jacket.
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Jewish and Romani Families in the Holocaust and its Aftermath

Dina Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust. International Library of Group Psychotherapy and Group Process (London: Tavistock/Routledge, 1992), 26–47. 66. Email FZS to author, July 8, 2015. 67. She considers that she only ...

Author: Eliyana R. Adler

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781978819528

Category: History

Page: 286

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Diaries, testimonies and memoirs of the Holocaust often include at least as much on the family as on the individual. Victims of the Nazi regime experienced oppression and made decisions embedded within families. Even after the war, sole survivors often described their losses and rebuilt their lives with a distinct focus on family. Yet this perspective is lacking in academic analyses. In this work, scholars from the United States, Israel, and across Europe bring a variety of backgrounds and disciplines to their study of the Holocaust and its aftermath from the family perspective. Drawing on research from Belarus to Great Britain, and examining both Jewish and Romani families, they demonstrate the importance of recognizing how people continued to function within family units—broadly defined—throughout the war and afterward.
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Reverberations of Nazi Violence in Germany and Beyond

See Dina Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust, trans. Naomi Goldblum (London: Routledge, 1992); Milner, Past Present; Milner, 'A Testimony to “The War After”'. In Grossman's novel See Under: Love, for example, ...

Author: Stephanie Bird

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474241861

Category: History

Page: 312

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Reverberations of Nazi Violence in Germany and Beyond explores the complex and diverse reverberations of the Second World War after 1945. It focuses on the legacies that National Socialist violence and genocide perpetrated in Europe continue to have in German-speaking countries and communities, as well as among those directly affected by occupation, terror and mass murder. Furthermore it explores how those legacies are in turn shaped by the present. The volume also considers conflicting, unexpected and often dissonant interpretations and representations of these events, made by those who were the witnesses, victims and perpetrators at the time and also by different communities in the generations that followed. The contributions, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, enrich our understanding of the complexity of the ways in which a disturbing past continues to disrupt the present and how the past is in turn disturbed and instrumentalized by a later present.
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Women in the Holocaust

While some, regardless—or perhaps because—of their wartime experiences, never wanted to have children, the focus on Jewish renewal and 'Life ... 97 Dina Wardi, Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust (London: Routledge, 1992).

Author: Zoë Waxman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191090707

Category: History

Page: 192

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Despite some pioneering work by scholars, historians still find it hard to listen to the voices of women in the Holocaust. Learning more about the women who both survived and did not survive the Nazi genocide — through the testimony of the women themselves — not only increases our understanding of this terrible period in history, but makes us rethink our relationship to the gendered nature of knowledge itself. Women in the Holocaust is about the ways in which socially- and culturally-constructed gender roles were placed under extreme pressure; yet also about the fact that gender continued to operate as an important arbiter of experience. Indeed, paradoxically enough, the extreme conditions of the Holocaust — even of the death camps — may have reinforced the importance of gender. Whilst Jewish men and women were both sentenced to death, gender nevertheless operated as a crucial signifier for survival. Pregnant women as well as women accompanied by young children or those deemed incapable of hard labour were sent straight to the gas chambers. The very qualities which made them women were manipulated and exploited by the Nazis as a source of dehumanization. Moreover, women were less likely to survive the camps even if they were not selected for death. Gender in the Holocaust therefore became a matter of life and death.
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The Holocaust Across Generations

WagnerPacifici, Robin, and Barry Schwartz. 1991. “The Vietnam Memorial: Commemorating a Difficult Past.” American Journal of Sociology 97:376–420. Wardi, Dina. 1992. Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust.

Author: Janet Jacobs

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479814343

Category: Religion

Page: 184

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Winner of the 2017 Outstanding Book Award for the Peace, War, and Social Conflict Section presented by the American Sociological Association Brings together the study of post-Holocaust family culture with the study of collective memory Over the last two decades, the cross-generational transmission of trauma has become an important area of research within both Holocaust studies and the more broad study of genocide. The overall findings of the research suggest that the Holocaust informs both the psychological and social development of the children of survivors who, like their parents, suffer from nightmares, guilt, fear, and sadness. The impact of social memory on the construction of survivor identities among succeeding generations has not yet been adequately explained. Moreover, the importance of gender to the intergenerational transmission of trauma has, for the most part, been overlooked. In The Holocaust across Generations, Janet Jacobs fills these significant gaps in the study of traumatic transference. The volume brings together the study of post-Holocaust family culture with the study of collective memory. Through an in-depth study of 75 children and grandchildren of survivors, the book examines the social mechanisms through which the trauma of the Holocaust is conveyed by survivors to succeeding generations. It explores the social structures—such as narratives, rituals, belief systems, and memorial sites—through which the collective memory of trauma is transmitted within families, examining the social relations of traumatic inheritance among children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors. Within this analytic framework, feminist theory and the importance of gender are brought to bear on the study of traumatic inheritance and the formation of trauma-based identities among Holocaust carrier groups.
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The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust

Memorial Candles: Children of the Holocaust. New York: Routledge, 1993. The author is an Israeli psychotherapist who used group therapy to treat the children of Holocaust survivors. The children of Holocaust survivors in Israel and ...

Author: Donald L. Niewyk

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231505901

Category: History

Page: 416

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Offering a multidimensional approach to one of the most important episodes of the twentieth century, The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust offers readers and researchers a general history of the Holocaust while delving into the core issues and debates in the study of the Holocaust today. Each of the book's five distinct parts stands on its own as valuable research aids; together, they constitute an integrated whole. Part I provides a narrative overview of the Holocaust, placing it within the larger context of Nazi Germany and World War II. Part II examines eight critical issues or controversies in the study of the Holocaust, including the following questions: Were the Jews the sole targets of Nazi genocide, or must other groups, such as homosexuals, the handicapped, Gypsies, and political dissenters, also be included? What are the historical roots of the Holocaust? How and why did the "Final Solution" come about? Why did bystanders extend or withhold aid? Part III consists of a concise chronology of major events and developments that took place surrounding the Holocaust, including the armistice ending World War I, the opening of the first major concentration camp at Dachau, Germany's invasion of Poland, the failed assassination attempt against Hitler, and the formation of Israel. Part IV contains short descriptive articles on more than two hundred key people, places, terms, and institutions central to a thorough understanding of the Holocaust. Entries include Adolf Eichmann, Anne Frank, the Warsaw Ghetto, Aryanization, the SS, Kristallnacht, and the Catholic Church. Part V presents an annotated guide to the best print, video, electronic, and institutional resources in English for further study. Armed with the tools contained in this volume, students or researchers investigating this vast and complicated topic will gain an informed understanding of one of the greatest tragedies in world history.
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