The Mixed Courts of Egypt

This book provides a history of the origins, development, and functioning of the mixed courts of Egypt during their first 50 years.

Author: Jasper Yeates Brinton

Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press

ISBN: UOM:39076006005669

Category: Courts

Page: 305

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This book provides a history of the origins, development, and functioning of the mixed courts of Egypt during their first 50 years.
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The Rule of Law in the Arab World

The book addresses important questions about the nature of Egypt's judicial system and the reasons why such a system appeals to Arab rulers outside Egypt.

Author: Nathan J. Brown

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521030684

Category: Law

Page: 280

View: 928

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Nathan Brown's penetrating account of the development and operation of the courts in the Arab world is based on fieldwork in Egypt and the Gulf. The book addresses important questions about the nature of Egypt's judicial system and the reasons why such a system appeals to Arab rulers outside Egypt. From the theoretical perspective, it also contributes to the debates about liberal legality, political change and the relationship between law and society in the developing world. It will be widely read by scholars of the Middle East, students of law and colonial historians.
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Islamic Law and Civil Code

Richard A. Debs analyzes the classical Islamic law of property based on the Shari'ah, traces its historic development in Egypt, and describes its integration as a source of law within the modern format of a civil code.

Author: Richard A. Debs

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231520997

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 171

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Richard A. Debs analyzes the classical Islamic law of property based on the Shari'ah, traces its historic development in Egypt, and describes its integration as a source of law within the modern format of a civil code. He focuses specifically on Egypt, a country in the Islamic world that drew upon its society's own vigorous legal system as it formed its modern laws. He also touches on issues that are common to all such societies that have adopted, either by choice or by necessity, Western legal systems. Egypt's unique synthesis of Western and traditional elements is the outcome of an effort to respond to national goals and requirements. Its traditional law, the Shari'ah, is the fundamental law of all Islamic societies, and Debs's analysis of Egypt's experience demonstrates how Islamic jurisprudence can be sophisticated, coherent, rational, and effective, developed over centuries to serve the needs of societies that flourished under the rule of law.
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