New Contexts for Eighteenth Century British Fiction

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Information Available Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data New contexts for eighteenth-century British fiction : "hearts resolved and hands prepared” : essays in honor of Jerry C.

Author: Christopher D. Johnson

Publisher: University of Delaware

ISBN: 9781611490411

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 384

View: 357

Download →

'New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction' is a collection of thirteen essays honoring Professor Jerry C. Beasley, who retired from the University of Delaware in 2005. The essays, written by friends, collaborators and former students, reflect the scholarly interests that defined Professor Beasley's career and point to new directions of critical inquiry.
Posted in:

New Contexts for Eighteenth century British Fiction

The essays, written by friends, collaborators and former students, reflect the scholarly interests that defined Professor Beasley's career and point to new directions of critical inquiry.

Author: Jerry C. Beasley

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1611490405

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 373

View: 896

Download →

New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction is a collection of thirteen essays honoring Professor Jerry C. Beasley, who retired from the University of Delaware in 2005. The essays, written by friends, collaborators and former students, reflect the scholarly interests that defined Professor Beasley's career and point to new directions of critical inquiry. The initial essays, which discuss Tobias Smollett, Elizabeth Singer Rowe, and Samuel Richardson, suggest new directions in biographical writing, including the intriguing discourse of "life writing" explored by Paula Backscheider. Subsequent essays enrich understandings of eighteenth-century fiction by examining lesser-known works by Jane Barker, Eliza Haywood, and Charlotte Lennox. Many of the essays, especially those that focus on Smollett, use political pamphlets, material artifacts, and urban legends to place familiar novels in new contexts. The collection's final essay demonstrates the vital importance of bibliographic study.
Posted in:

Eighteenth century Contexts

This text offers an array of essays that consider literary, intellectual, political, theological and cultural aspects of the years 1650-1800, in the British Isles and Europe.

Author: Greg Harkin

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299174808

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 305

View: 589

Download →

Eighteenth-Century Contexts offers a lively array of essays that consider literary, intellectual, political, theological, and cultural aspects of the years 1650–1800, in the British Isles and Europe. At the center of the book is Jonathan Swift; several essays delve into his poetry, his similarities to Bernard Mandeville, his response to Anthony Collins's Discourse of Free-Thinking, and the relationship between his Gulliver's Travels and Thomas More's Utopia. Other essays discuss Alexander Pope, eighteenth-century music and poetry, William Congreve, James Boswell, Samuel Richardson, and women's novels of the eighteenth century.
Posted in:

Narrating Friendship and the British Novel 1760 1830

38 32 Janet Todd, ed., A Dictionary of British and American Women Writers 1660–1800 (London: Methuen, 1987), 196. ... National Identities in Charlotte Lennox's Euphemia', in New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction, ed.

Author: Katrin Berndt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317132608

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

View: 99

Download →

Friendship has always been a universal category of human relationships and an influential motif in literature, but it is rarely discussed as a theme in its own right. In her study of how friendship gives direction and shape to new ideas and novel strategies of plot, character formation, and style in the British novel from the 1760s to the 1830s, Katrin Berndt argues that friendship functions as a literary expression of philosophical values in a genre that explores the psychology and the interactions of the individual in modern society. In the literary historical period in which the novel became established as a modern genre, friend characters were omnipresent, reflecting enlightenment philosophy’s definition of friendship as a bond that civilized public and private interactions and was considered essential for the attainment of happiness. Berndt’s analyses of genre-defining novels by Frances Brooke, Mary Shelley, Sarah Scott, Helen Maria Williams, Charlotte Lennox, Walter Scott, Jane Austen, and Maria Edgeworth show that the significance of friendship and the increasing variety of novelistic forms and topics represent an overlooked dynamic in the novel’s literary history. Contributing to our understanding of the complex interplay of philosophical, socio-cultural and literary discourses that shaped British fiction in the later Hanoverian decades, Berndt’s book demonstrates that novels have conceived the modern individual not in opposition to, but in interaction with society, continuing Enlightenment debates about how to share the lives and the experiences of others.
Posted in:

A Political Biography of Sarah Fielding

Pettella, T., “Devotional Readings and the Novel Form: The Case of David Simple,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction 24.2 ... History of England,” in Tobias Smollett, Scotland's First Novelist: New Essays in Memory of Paul-Gabriel Boucé, ed.

Author: Christopher D Johnson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781351624992

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 677

Download →

A Political Biography of Sarah Fielding provides the most complete discussion of Fielding’s works and career currently available. Tracing the development of Fielding’s artistic and instructive agendas from her earliest publications forward, Johnson presents a compelling portrait of a deeply read author who sought to claim a place within literary culture for women’s experiences. As a practical didacticist, Fielding sought to teach her readers to live happier, more fulfilling lives by appropriating and at times resisting the texts that defined their culture. While Fielding often retreats from the overtly political concerns that captured the attention of her contemporaries, her works are daring forays into the public sphere that both challenge and reinforce the foundations of British society. Giving voice to those who have been marginalized, Fielding’s creative productions are at once conservative and radical, revealing her ambiguous appreciation for tradition, her fears of modernity, and her abiding commitment to women who must live within forever imperfect worlds.
Posted in:

Elizabeth Singer Rowe and the Development of the English Novel

Eighteenth-Century Women Poets and Their Poetry. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2005. ———. “Elizabeth Singer Rowe: Lifestyle as Legacy.” In New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction, edited by Christopher D. Johnson, ...

Author: Paula R. Backscheider

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421408422

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 382

Download →

Elizabeth Singer Rowe and the Development of the English Novel is the first in-depth study of Rowe’s prose fiction. A four-volume collection of her work was a bestseller for a hundred years after its publication, but today Rowe is a largely unrecognized figure in the history of the novel. Although her poetry was appreciated by poets such as Alexander Pope for its metrical craftsmanship, beauty, and imagery, by the time of her death in 1737 she was better known for her fiction. According to Paula R. Backscheider, Rowe's major focus in her novels was on creating characters who were seeking a harmonious, contented life, often in the face of considerable social pressure. This quest would become the plotline in a large number of works in the second half of the eighteenth century, and it continues to be a major theme today in novels by women. Backscheider relates Rowe’s work to popular fiction written by earlier writers as well as by her contemporaries. Rowe had a lasting influence on major movements, including the politeness (or gentility) movement, the reading revolution, and the Bluestocking society. The author reveals new information about each of these movements, and Elizabeth Singer Rowe emerges as an important innovator. Her influence resulted in new types of novel writing, philosophies, and lifestyles for women. Backscheider looks to archival materials, literary analysis, biographical evidence, and a configuration of cultural and feminist theories to prove her groundbreaking argument.
Posted in:

The Savage and Modern Self

North American Indians in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture Robbie Richardson ... In New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”: Essays in Honor of Jerry C. Beasley, ...

Author: Robbie Richardson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487503444

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 888

Download →

The Savage and Modern Self examines the representations of North American "Indians" in novels, poetry, plays, and material culture from eighteenth-century Britain. Author Robbie Richardson argues that depictions of "Indians" in British literature were used to critique and articulate evolving ideas about consumerism, colonialism, "Britishness," and, ultimately, the "modern self" over the course of the century. Considering the ways in which British writers represented contact between Britons and "Indians," both at home and abroad, the author shows how these sites of contact moved from a self-affirmation of British authority earlier in the century, to a mutual corruption, to a desire to appropriate perceived traits of "Indianess." Looking at texts exclusively produced in Britain, The Savage and Modern Self reveals that "the modern" finds definition through imagined scenes of cultural contact. By the end of the century, Richardson concludes, the hybrid Indian-Brition emerging in literature and visual culture exemplifies a form of modern, British masculinity.
Posted in:

Editing Lives

New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”: Essays in Honor of Jerry C. Beasley. Newark: University of Delaware Press in association with Rowman & Littlefield, 2011. ———. “Novel Forms and ...

Author: Jesse G. Swan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781611485417

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 302

View: 108

Download →

Lives are known textually, and this collection of new essays explores, corrects, and advances contemporary knowledge of historical lives and texts, particularly of the British eighteenth century. Complementing the essays is a complete translation and critical edition of a life of Hester Thrale Piozzi written in French by Frances Burney.
Posted in:

Approaches to Teaching the Works of John Dryden

He is the editor of New Contexts in Eighteenth-Century British Fiction and is preparing an edition of Sarah Fielding's The History of the Countess of Dellwyn. Deborah Kennedy is professor of English at Saint Mary's University, Halifax.

Author: Jayne Lewis

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN: 9781603291675

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 200

Download →

Which John Dryden should be brought into the twenty-first-century college classroom? The rehabilitator of the ancients? The first of the moderns? The ambivalent laureate? The sidelined convert to Rome? The literary theorist? The translator? The playwright? The poet? This volume in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature addresses the tensions, contradictions, and versatility of a writer who, in the words of Samuel Johnson, "found [English poetry] brick, and left it marble," who was, in the words of Walter Scott, "one of the greatest of our masters." Part 1, "Materials," offers a guide to the teaching editions of Dryden's work and a discussion of the background resources, from biographies and literary criticism to social, cultural, political, and art histories. In part 2, "Approaches," essays describe different pedagogical entries into Dryden and his time. These approaches cover subjects as various as genre, adaptation, literary rivalry, musical setting, and political and religious poetry in classroom situations that range from the traditional survey to learning through performance.
Posted in:

Women from the Parsonage

'Elizabeth Singer Rowe: Lifestyle as Legacy', New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”: Essays in Honor of Jerry C. Beasley, ed. by Christopher D. Johnson, Newark: University of Delaware ...

Author: Cindy K. Renker

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110590364

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 816

Download →

This volume provides a new context for women’s writing from the seventeenth through the end of the nineteenth century, highlighting the significant role of the parsonage and the parson himself for women’s education in those centuries. Cindy K. Renker and Susanne Bach's collection of essays is the first of its kind on the education, lives, and works of highly accomplished daughters of Protestant clergymen. Since this volume only represents a limited number of women raised and educated in parsonages, it will surely encourage more investigation of other women writers, translators, educators, etc. with similar backgrounds. Moreover, since this book takes a comparative and transnational approach by focusing on different regions of Europe and different centuries. This collection of essays is thus aimed at scholars in multiple fields such as British literature, German studies, gender studies, the history of women’s education, and social and cultural history.
Posted in:

The Practice of Satire in England 1658 1770

In New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “I~Iearts Resolved and Hands Prepare ”: Essays in Honor of jerry C. Beasley, edited by Christopher D. Johnson, 219*230. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2011. Clare, Janet.

Author: Ashley Marshall

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421408163

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 430

View: 857

Download →

In The Practice of Satire in England, 1658-1770, Ashley Marshall explores how satire was conceived and understood by writers and readers of the period. Her account is based on a reading of some 3,000 works ranging from one-page squibs to novels. The objective is not to recuperate particular minor works but to recover the satiric milieu—to resituate the masterpieces amid the hundreds of other works alongside which they were originally written and read. The long eighteenth century is generally hailed as the great age of satire, and as such, it has received much critical attention. However, scholars have focused almost exclusively on a small number of canonical works, such as Gulliver’s Travels and The Dunciad, and have not looked for continuity over time. Marshall revises the standard account of eighteenth-century satire, revealing it to be messy, confused, discontinuous, and exhibiting radical and rapid changes over time. The true history of satire in its great age is not a history at all. Rather, it is a collection of discontinuous little histories.
Posted in:

Before the West Was West

“Transcultural Adoption in the Eighteenth-Century Transatlantic Novel: Questioning National Identities in Charlotte Lennox's Euphemia.” New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”: Essays in ...

Author: Amy T. Hamilton

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803254893

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 357

View: 428

Download →

Before the West Was West examines the extent to which scholars have engaged in-depth with pre-1800 “western” texts and asks what we mean by “western” American literature in the first place and when that designation originated. Calling into question the implicit temporal boundaries of the “American West” in literature, a literature often viewed as having commenced only at the beginning of the 1800s, Before the West Was West explores the concrete, meaningful connections between different texts as well as the development of national ideologies and mythologies. Examining pre-nineteenth-century writings that do not fit conceptions of the Wild West or of cowboys, cattle ranching, and the Pony Express, these thirteen essays demonstrate that no single, unified idea or geography defines the American West. Contributors investigate texts ranging from the Norse Vinland Sagas and Mary Rowlandson’s famous captivity narrative to early Spanish and French exploration narratives, an eighteenth-century English novel, and a play by Aphra Behn. Through its examination of the disparate and multifaceted body of literature that arises from a broad array of cultural backgrounds and influences, Before the West Was West apprehends the literary West in temporal as well as spatial and cultural terms and poses new questions about “westernness” and its literary representation.
Posted in:

Poetic Sisters

In A Concise Companion to the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. ... In The Cambridge ITistory ofEnglish Literature. Vol. ... In New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: 'Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared": Essays in Honor ...

Author: Deborah Kennedy

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781611484854

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 293

Download →

Poetic Sisters explores the personal and literary connections among five eighteenth-century women poets. Anchored in the work of Anne Finch, author of “A Nocturnal Reverie,” this book explores a female literary network, and emphasizes the range and extent of these writers' poetic achievement and its resonance for the twenty-first-century reader.
Posted in:

Partisan Politics Narrative Realism and the Rise of the British Novel

Before Novels: The Cultural Contexts of Eighteenth-Century English Fiction. New York: W. W. Norton, 1990. Hutner, Heidi, ed. Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, and Criticism. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993.

Author: R. Carnell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781403983541

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 452

Download →

This book considers why narrative realism in literature is seen as a 'full account' of 'real life' and the individual self. Unconventionally, Carnell shows that the formal conventions of narrative realism emerged in the seventeenth century in response to an explosion of partisan writings that put into play competing versions of political selfhood.
Posted in:

Eighteenth Century British Literature and Postcolonial Studies

Hunter, J. Paul (1990), Before Novels: The Cultural Contexts of EighteenthCentury English Fiction, New York: W. W. Norton. Hutner, Heidi (2001), Colonial Women: Race and Culture in Stuart Drama, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Author: Suvir Kaul

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748634569

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 291

Download →

'This book convincingly challenges both the extremely short historical memory of most postcolonial work and the all-too-insularly English world still conjured by period specialists. Hogarthian whores and Grub Street hacks, coffee houses and fashionable pastimes, and the burgeoning of print culture all stand revealed as intimately bound to portents of plantation insurgency, agitation for abolition, and the vast fortunes produced by the labouring bodies of the poor, the colonized, and the enslaved. Eighteenth-century studies has never appeared in a more engaged and fascinating light.'Professor Donna Landry, University of KentIn this volume Suvir Kaul addresses the relations between literary culture, English commercial and colonial expansion, and the making of 'Great Britain' in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He argues that literary writing played a crucial role in generating the vocabulary of British nationalism, both in inter-national terms and in attempts to realign political and cultural relations between England, Scotland, and Ireland. The formal innovations and practices characteristic of eighteenth-century English literature were often responses to the worlds brought into view by travel writers, merchants, and colonists. Writers (even those suspicious of mercantile and colonial expansion) worked with a growing sense of a 'national literature' whose achievements would provide the cultural capital adequate to global imperial power, and would distinguish Great Britain for its twin success in 'arms and arts'. The book ranges from Davenant's theatre to Smollet's Roderick Random to Phillis Wheatley's poetry to trace the impact of empire on literary creativity.Key Features*An introduction to the impact of mercantilism and empire on the crafting of eighteenth-century British literature*Encourages students to examine the key formal innovations that define eighteenth-century British literary history as they were produced by writers who redefined
Posted in:

Collective Understanding Radicalism and Literary History 1645 1742

in 1724 and included titles from that volume such as : Love in Excess , The British Recluse , The Injur'd Husband ... in New Contexts of Eighteenth - Century British Fiction : " Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared ” ; Essays in Honor of ...

Author: Melissa Mowry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192658395

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 223

Download →

Political, literary, and cultural historians of the early modern Anglophone world have long characterized the crucial century between 1642 and 1742 as the period when absolutist theories of sovereignty yielded their dominance to shared models of governance and a burgeoning doctrine of unalienable, individual rights. Yet even the most cursory glance at the cultural record, reveals that individualism was largely a footnote to a conflict over the production of political and cultural authority that erupted around the middle of the seventeenth century between sovereignty and collectivity. Collective Understanding, Radicalism, and Literary History reaches back to the English civil wars (1642-46, 1648) when a distinctive and anti-authoritarian hermeneutic emerged from the dissident community known as the Levellers. Active between 1645 and 1653, the Levellers argued that a more just political order required that knowledge, previously structured by the epistemology of singularity upon which sovereignty had built its authority, be reorganized around the interpretive principles and practices of affiliation and collectivity. Collective Understanding contends that late Stuart and eighteenth-century literature played a central role in marginalizing the non-elite methods of interpretation and knowledge production that had emerged in the 1640s. While pamphlets and other readily available texts ridiculed members of the commonalty, it was the longer narrative arcs of drama and fiction that were uniquely able to foreground the collaborative methods civil war dissidents and the Levellers in particular had used to advance their opposition to sovereignty's epistemological paradigm. Writers such as William Davenant, Aphra Behn, Edward Sexby, Algernon Sidney, and Daniel Defoe repeatedly exposed these dissident methods as a profound and potentially catastrophic challenge to the political privileges of the ancien régime as well as its ancestral monopoly on the production of new knowledge.
Posted in:

2012

Houts, Elisabeth van: Intermarriage in EleventhCentury England. 237. Vincent, Nicholas: More Tales of ... Beasley, jerry C. (Literaturwissenschaft 1940) Iohnson, Christopher D. (Ed.): New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction.

Author:

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110278712

Category: Reference

Page: 3072

View: 290

Download →

Particularly in the humanities and social sciences, festschrifts are a popular forum for discussion. The IJBF provides quick and easy general access to these important resources for scholars and students. The festschrifts are located in state and regional libraries and their bibliographic details are recorded. Since 1983, more than 659,000 articles from more than 30,500 festschrifts, published between 1977 and 2011, have been catalogued.
Posted in:

The Oxford Handbook of the Eighteenth Century Novel

Hunter, J. Paul., Before Novels: The Cultural Contexts of Eighteenth-Century English Fiction (New York: Norton, 1990). Ingrassia, Catherine, Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit ...

Author: J. A. Downie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191651069

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

View: 543

Download →

Although the emergence of the English novel is generally regarded as an eighteenth-century phenomenon, this is the first book to be published professing to cover the 'eighteenth-century English novel' in its entirety. This Handbook surveys the development of the English novel during the 'long' eighteenth century-in other words, from the later seventeenth century right through to the first three decades of the nineteenth century when, with the publication of the novels of Jane Austen and Walter Scott, 'the novel' finally gained critical acceptance and assumed the position of cultural hegemony it enjoyed for over a century. By situating the novels of the period which are still read today against the background of the hundreds published between 1660 and 1830, this Handbook not only covers those 'masters and mistresses' of early prose fiction-such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Scott and Austen-who are still acknowledged to be seminal figures in the emergence and development of the English novel, but also the significant number of recently-rediscovered novelists who were popular in their own day. At the same time, its comprehensive coverage of cultural contexts not considered by any existing study, but which are central to the emergence of the novel, such as the book trade and the mechanics of book production, copyright and censorship, the growth of the reading public, the economics of culture both in London and in the provinces, and the re-printing of popular fiction after 1774, offers unique insight into the making of the English novel.
Posted in:

Women s Utopias of the Eighteenth Century

University Press , 1983 ) ; Lennard J. Davis , Resisting Novels : Ideology and Fiction ( New York : Methuen , 1987 ) ; J. Paul Hunter , Before Novels : The Cultural Contexts of Eighteenth - Century English Fiction ( New York : W. W. ...

Author: Alessa Johns

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252028414

Category: Social Science

Page: 212

View: 244

Download →

No human society has ever been perfect, a fact that has led thinkers as far back as Plato and St. Augustine to conceive of utopias both as a fanciful means of escape from an imperfect reality and as a useful tool with which to design improvements upon it. The most studied utopias have been proposed by men, but during the eighteenth century a group of reform-oriented female novelists put forth a series of work that expressed their views of, and their reservations about, ideal societies. In Women's Utopias of the Eighteenth Century, Alessa Johns examines the utopian communities envisaged by Mary Astell, Sarah Fielding, Mary Hamilton, Sarah Scott, and other writers from Britain and continental Europe, uncovering the ways in which they resembled--and departed from--traditional utopias. Johns demonstrates that while traditional visions tended to look back to absolutist models, women's utopias quickly incorporated emerging liberal ideas that allowed far more room for personal initiative and gave agency to groups that were not culturally dominant, such as the female writers themselves. Women's utopias, Johns argues, were reproductive in nature. They had the potential to reimagine and perpetuate themselves.
Posted in:

Essential Scots and the Idea of Unionism in Anglo Scottish Literature 1603 1832

A portion of chapter 2 appeared as “Revising the Scottish Plot in Tobias Smollett's Roderick Random,” in New Contexts for Eighteenth-Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared”: Essays in Honor of Jerry C. Beasley, ed.

Author: Rivka Swenson

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 9781611486797

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 619

Download →

Essential Scots scrutinizes diverse texts from the Union of Crowns and James VI/I’s Edinburgh-London emigration to the aftermath of George IV’s London-Edinburgh-London journey more than two centuries later, exposing how the “essential” Scot, allegedly possessed of a uniquely durable, influential identity, shaped the literary-cultural narrative imagination from 1603-1832, with implications for the twenty-first century. The essential Scot’s supposed aptitude for personal resistance and recovery were marshaled by Scottish and English writers to formally challenge, accommodate, generate, revise, and mediate between the universalizing and individualizing trajectories of British unionism still negotiated today.
Posted in: