Next Generation ABAP Development


Author: Rich Heilman,Thomas Jung
Publisher: SAP PRESS
ISBN: 9781592293520
Category: ABAP/4 (Computer program language)
Page: 735
View: 5999
DOWNLOAD NOW »
• Presents the most recent ABAP technologies and tools through the eyes of a developer• Includes new content on syntax enhancements, Web Dynpro, SAP BusinessObjects integration, XML processing, Rich Islands, and more• Companion CD includes an HTML version of the first edition, as well as code samplesNext Generation ABAP Development is a book designed to keep seasoned developers up-to-date with the latest techniques and technologies available in ABAP. In the second edition of this best-selling title, follow along with a lead ABAP developer as he learns how to assess and employ the new tools and features of ABAP within SAP NetWeaver 7.0 to 7.0 enhancement package 2 (EhP2). You'll be able to witness the entire process of building applications: design, development, and testing of all areas. In addition, you'll also become familiar with end-to-end object-oriented design techniques.New Tools and FeaturesKeep your ABAP knowledge up-to-date by mastering the new tools and features of ABAP within SAP NetWeaver 7.0 to 7.0 EhP2.Real-World ExamplesLearn about new possibilities in ABAP by exploring example scenarios related to the fictional development project discussed throughout the book.Brand New ContentExplore completely new content about ABAP syntax enhancements, Web Dynpro, XML processing,SAP BusinessObjects integration, and more.ABAP Troubleshooting and Web ServicesFind expanded and updated information about ABAP troubleshooting and Web Services.CD ContentBenefit from a CD that contains code samples and an HTML version of the first edition of this book.Highlights• Workbench tools and package hierarchy• ABAP syntax enhancements• Data Dictionary objects• Data persistence layer• Shared memory objects• ABAP and SAP NetWeaver Master Data• Management• XML processing and XSLT• SAP Interactive Forms by Adobe

The Architecture of SAP ERP

Understand how successful software works
Author: Jochen Boeder,Bernhard Groene
Publisher: tredition
ISBN: 3849576620
Category: Science
Page: 270
View: 6988
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book - compiled by software architects from SAP - is a must for consultants, developers, IT managers, and students working with SAP ERP, but also users who want to know the world behind their SAP user interface.

El líder de la próxima generación

5 elementos esenciales para los forjadores del futuro
Author: Andy Stanley
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780789911490
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 165
View: 6159
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Next Generation Technology-Enhanced Assessment

Global Perspectives on Occupational and Workplace Testing
Author: John C. Scott,Dave Bartram,Douglas H. Reynolds
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107124360
Category: Computers
Page: 440
View: 9395
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book examines the types of web-based testing applications that exist, their technical requirements, and their acceptability and use in various countries.

Comprendre et appliquer le SQL en ABAP


Author: Yann SZWEC,Stephane LE GUEN
Publisher: TYALGR
ISBN: 2953640827
Category:
Page: 400
View: 8407
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Livre pédagogique pour apprendre l'application du SQL dans le langage ABAP. Didactique, il convient parfaitement aux consultants techniques comme aux consultants fonctionnels. Plus de 400 pages, format A4, en couleur. Table des matières Objectifs de l’ouvrage 3 Remerciements 4 Table des matières 5 Introduction 18 1 CHAPITRE 01 – La théorie entourant le SQL 21 1.1 Le S.Q.L. 22 1.1.1 Définition 22 1.1.2 La syntaxe du S.Q.L. 23 1.1.3 Utilisation du S.Q.L. dans les bases de données relationnelles 27 1.2 MERISE 28 1.3 Application du SQL en ABAP 30 1.3.1 Les contraintes propres au monde SAP 30 1.3.2 Les contraintes apportées par les bases de données 30 1.4 La méthode de formation 32 1.4.1 Les parties du livre 32 1.4.2 La présentation des exemples S.Q.L. 32 1.4.3 Les choix d’application des exemples S.Q.L. 33 1.4.4 La gestion des exemples 33 2 CHAPITRE 02 - La présentation de l'environnement de travail 35 2.1 SE80 : l’atelier de développement 36 2.1.1 Présentation de la SE80 36 2.1.2 Description des principaux boutons de commande 39 2.2 Une conduite de projet technique SAP 40 2.2.1 Une norme de développement 40 2.2.2 Une méthodologie de travail 41 2.2.3 Un programme modèle 41 2.3 Le langage ABAP 44 2.3.1 Généralités 44 2.3.2 Les instructions 44 2.4 La gestion de la base de données : le DDIC, les transactions SE11 et SE16N 46 2.4.1 Le DDIC 46 2.4.2 La transaction SE11 47 2.4.3 La transaction SE16N 49 2.5 L’architecture technique SAP : WAS, 3 tiers, Le serveur d’application 51 2.5.1 Le W.A.S. 51 2.5.2 Les caractéristiques SAP au niveau technique 53 2.5.3 Le serveur d’application 54 2.5.4 Le paysage système SAP 55 2.5.5 La notion de mandant 56 2.6 Conclusion 57 3 CHAPITRE 03 – L’instruction SELECT SINGLE 59 3.1 La théorie 60 3.1.1 La syntaxe 60 3.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 60 3.2 La démonstration 61 3.2.1 Le contexte 61 3.2.2 Les tables utilisées 61 3.2.3 La requête à exécuter 62 3.3 Présentation du résultat 64 3.3.1 Ecran de sélection 64 3.3.2 Ecran de résultat 64 3.4 Analyse du résultat 65 3.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 65 3.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 66 3.4.3 Trace SQL 67 3.5 Conclusion 68 4 CHAPITRE 04 – L’instruction UP TO 1 ROWS 69 4.1 La théorie 70 4.1.1 La syntaxe 70 4.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 70 4.2 La démonstration 71 4.2.1 Le contexte 71 4.2.2 Les tables utilisées 73 4.2.3 La requête à exécuter 74 4.3 Présentation du résultat 75 4.3.1 Ecran de sélection 75 4.3.2 Ecran de liste 75 4.4 Analyse du résultat 76 4.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 76 4.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 76 4.4.3 Trace SQL 77 4.5 Conclusion 78 4.5.1 Une gestion de boucle 78 4.5.2 Autre méthode de travail 78 5 CHAPITRE 05 – L’instruction INNER JOIN 79 5.1 La théorie 80 5.1.1 La syntaxe 80 5.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 80 5.2 La démonstration 81 5.2.1 Le contexte 81 5.2.2 Les tables utilisées 82 5.2.3 La requête à exécuter 84 5.3 Présentation du résultat 86 5.3.1 Ecran de sélection 86 5.3.2 Ecran de liste 86 5.4 Analyse du résultat 87 5.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 87 5.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 87 5.4.3 Trace SQL 88 5.5 Conclusion 88 6 CHAPITRE 06 – L’instruction OUTER JOIN 89 6.1 La théorie 90 6.1.1 La syntaxe 90 6.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 90 6.2 La démonstration 91 6.2.1 Le contexte 91 6.2.2 Les tables utilisées 91 6.2.3 La requête à exécuter 93 6.3 Présentation du résultat 95 6.3.1 Ecran de sélection 95 6.3.2 Ecran de liste 95 6.4 Analyse du résultat 96 6.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 96 6.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 96 6.4.3 Trace SQL 97 6.5 Conclusion 98 7 CHAPITRE 07 – L’instruction VIEW 99 7.1 La théorie 100 7.1.1 La syntaxe 100 7.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 100 7.2 La démonstration 101 7.2.1 Le contexte 101 7.2.2 Les tables utilisées 101 7.2.3 Présentation de la relation entre les tables dans la vue V_EKKOPO 102 7.2.4 La requête à exécuter 105 7.3 Présentation du résultat 107 7.3.1 Ecran de sélection 107 7.3.2 Ecran de liste 107 7.4 Analyse du résultat 108 7.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 108 7.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 108 7.4.3 Trace SQL 109 7.5 Conclusion 110 7.5.1 Avantages 110 7.5.2 Inconvénients 110 8 CHAPITRE 08 – L’instruction APPENDING 111 8.1 La théorie 112 8.1.1 La syntaxe 112 8.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 112 8.2 La démonstration 113 8.2.1 Le contexte 113 8.2.2 La requête à exécuter 115 8.3 Présentation du résultat 118 8.3.1 Ecran de sélection 118 8.3.2 Ecran de liste 118 8.4 Analyse du résultat 119 8.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 119 8.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 119 8.4.3 Trace SQL 120 8.5 Conclusion 121 9 CHAPITRE 09 – L’instruction FOR ALL ENTRIES 123 9.1 La théorie 124 9.1.1 La syntaxe 124 9.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 124 9.2 La démonstration 125 9.2.1 Le contexte 125 9.2.2 Les tables utilisées 126 9.2.3 La requête à exécuter 128 9.3 Présentation du résultat 131 9.3.1 Ecran de sélection 131 9.3.2 Ecran de liste 131 9.4 Analyse du résultat 132 9.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 132 9.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 132 9.4.3 Trace SQL 133 9.5 Conclusion 134 10 CHAPITRE 10 – L’instruction SELECT ENDSELECT 135 10.1 La théorie 136 10.1.1 La syntaxe 136 10.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 136 10.2 La démonstration 137 10.2.1 Le contexte 137 10.2.2 Les tables utilisées 137 10.2.3 La requête à exécuter 138 10.3 Présentation du résultat 139 10.3.1 Ecran de sélection 139 10.3.2 Ecran de liste 139 10.4 Analyse du résultat 141 10.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 141 10.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 141 10.4.3 Trace SQL 142 10.5 Conclusion 142 10.5.1 Avantages 142 10.5.2 Inconvénients 143 11 CHAPITRE 11 – L’instruction EXISTS 145 11.1 La théorie 146 11.1.1 La syntaxe 146 11.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 146 11.2 La démonstration 147 11.2.1 Le contexte 147 11.2.2 Les tables utilisées 147 11.2.3 La requête à exécuter 149 11.3 Présentation du résultat 151 11.3.1 Ecran de sélection 151 11.3.2 Ecran de liste 151 11.4 Analyse du résultat 152 11.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 152 11.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 152 11.4.3 Trace SQL 152 11.5 Conclusion 153 12 CHAPITRE 12 – L’instruction PACKAGE SIZE 155 12.1 La théorie 156 12.1.1 La syntaxe 156 12.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 156 12.2 La démonstration 157 12.2.1 Le contexte 157 12.2.2 Les tables utilisées 157 12.2.3 La requête à exécuter 158 12.3 Présentation du résultat 160 12.3.1 Ecran de sélection 160 12.3.2 Ecran de liste 160 12.4 Analyse du résultat 161 12.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 161 12.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 161 12.4.3 Trace SQL 163 12.5 Conclusion 164 13 CHAPITRE 13 – L’instruction INTO CORRESPONDING FIELDS 165 13.1 La théorie 166 13.1.1 La syntaxe 166 13.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 166 13.2 La démonstration 167 13.2.1 Le contexte 167 13.2.2 Les tables utilisées 168 13.2.3 Les structures utilisées 168 13.2.4 La requête à exécuter 170 13.3 Présentation du résultat 173 13.3.1 Ecran de sélection 173 13.3.2 Ecran de liste 173 13.4 Analyse du résultat 174 13.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 174 13.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 174 13.4.3 Trace SQL 175 13.5 Conclusion 176 14 CHAPITRE 14 – L’instruction CURSOR 177 14.1 La théorie 178 14.1.1 La syntaxe 178 14.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 178 14.2 La démonstration 179 14.2.1 Le contexte 179 14.2.2 Les tables utilisées 179 14.2.3 La requête à exécuter 180 14.3 Présentation du résultat 182 14.3.1 Ecran de sélection 182 14.3.2 Ecran de liste 182 14.4 Analyse du résultat 183 14.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 183 14.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 183 14.4.3 Trace SQL 184 14.5 Conclusion 184 15 CHAPITRE 15 – Le natif S.Q.L. (ou ce qu’il ne faut pas faire) 185 15.1 La théorie 186 15.1.1 La syntaxe 186 15.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 187 15.2 La démonstration d’une requête simple en natif SQL 187 15.2.1 Le contexte 187 15.2.2 Les tables utilisées 187 15.2.3 L’exemple 188 15.3 La démonstration de l’appel d’une procédure stockée en natif SQL 188 15.3.1 Le contexte 188 15.3.2 Les tables utilisées 188 15.3.3 L’exemple 189 15.4 Conclusion 192 16 CHAPITRE 16 – L’instruction INSERT 193 16.1 La théorie 194 16.1.1 La syntaxe 194 16.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 194 16.2 La démonstration 195 16.2.1 Le contexte 195 16.2.2 Les tables utilisées 196 16.2.3 La requête à exécuter 197 16.3 Présentation du résultat par insertion par occurrence 201 16.3.1 Ecran de sélection 201 16.3.2 Ecran de liste 201 16.4 Analyse du résultat 202 16.4.1 CODE INSPECTOR 202 16.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 202 16.4.3 Trace SQL 203 16.5 Conclusion 204 17 CHAPITRE 17 – Les instructions UPDATE / MODIFY 205 17.1 La théorie 206 17.1.1 La syntaxe 206 17.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 206 17.2 La démonstration 207 17.2.1 Le contexte 207 17.2.2 Les tables utilisées 207 17.2.3 La requête à utiliser 208 17.3 Présentation du résultat 211 17.3.1 Ecran de sélection 211 17.3.2 Ecran de résultat 211 17.4 Analyse du résultat 212 17.4.1 Code inspector 212 17.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 212 17.4.3 Trace SQL 215 17.5 Conclusion 218 18 CHAPITRE 18 – Mise à jour d’une table spécifique 219 18.1 La théorie 220 18.1.1 La syntaxe 220 18.1.2 L’impact sur la base de données 220 18.2 La démonstration 221 18.2.1 Le contexte 221 18.2.2 Les tables utilisées 221 18.2.3 La requête à utiliser 222 18.3 Présentation du résultat 226 18.3.1 Ecran de sélection 226 18.3.2 Ecran de résultat 226 18.4 Analyse du résultat 227 18.4.1 Code inspector 227 18.4.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 227 18.4.3 Trace SQL 229 18.5 Conclusion 230 19 CHAPITRE 19 – LES BAPI : L’intégration de données dans SAP 231 19.1 Objectifs 232 19.2 Les moyens 233 19.2.1 Règles d’utilisation d’une BAPI dans un programme 233 19.2.2 La gestion du transactionnel avec une BAPI 233 19.3 La démonstration 236 19.3.1 Le contexte 236 19.3.2 Les données utilisées 236 19.3.3 Le programme à utiliser 237 19.4 Présentation du résultat 240 19.4.1 Ecran de sélection 240 19.4.2 Ecran de résultat 240 19.5 Analyse du résultat 240 19.5.1 Code inspector 240 19.5.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 241 19.5.3 Trace SQL 241 19.6 Conclusion 242 19.6.1 Avantages 242 19.6.2 Inconvénients 242 20 CHAPITRE 20 – LES BAPI : Le contrôle d’intégration 243 20.1 Objectifs 244 20.2 Les moyens 244 20.3 La démonstration 245 20.3.1 Le contexte 245 20.3.2 Les données utilisées 245 20.3.3 Le programme à utiliser 246 20.4 Présentation du résultat 250 20.4.1 Ecran de sélection 250 20.4.2 Ecran de résultat 250 20.5 Analyse du résultat 251 20.5.1 Code inspector 251 20.5.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 251 20.5.3 Trace SQL 252 20.6 Conclusion 252 21 CHAPITRE 21 – LES BAPIS : Les traitements de masse 253 21.1 Objectifs 254 21.2 Les moyens 254 21.3 La démonstration 254 21.3.1 Le contexte 254 21.3.2 Les données utilisées 254 21.3.3 Le programme à utiliser 256 21.4 Présentation du résultat 259 21.4.1 Ecran de sélection 259 21.4.2 Ecran de résultat 259 21.5 Analyse du résultat 260 21.5.1 Code inspector 260 21.5.2 Analyse de la durée d’exécution 260 21.5.3 Trace SQL 261 21.6 Conclusion 262 22 CHAPITRE 22 – Le CRM selon SAP 263 22.1 Préambule 264 22.2 Le CRM selon SAP 266 22.2.1 Présentation fonctionnelle 266 22.2.2 Présentation technique 271 22.3 Le CRM avant la programmation objet 273 22.3.1 Présentation de l’interface utilisateur (CRM5.0 et précédemment) 273 22.3.2 Présentation base de données et programmation procédurale, présentation des données 277 22.4 Le CRM après le WEB UI 283 22.4.1 Ce qui n’a pas changé 283 22.4.2 Les modifications dans l’interface utilisateur : internet explorer 283 22.5 Conclusion 290 23 CHAPITRE 23 – Le futur du SQL : le Business Object Layer (B.O.L.) 291 23.1 Objectif 292 23.2 Les bases de la réflexion 292 23.3 La réflexion orientée objet 294 23.4 La solution SAP 295 23.4.1 L’objet de recherche 295 23.4.2 L’objet de résultat 295 23.4.3 Concept générique correspondant à la programmation objet 295 23.4.4 Un nouveau modèle de données 297 23.5 La transaction GENIL_MODEL_BROWSER 297 23.6 La nouveauté avec le CRM EHP1 305 23.7 Conclusion (Avantages / inconvénients) 306 23.7.1 Avantages 306 23.7.2 Inconvénients 306 24 CHAPITRE 24 – La transaction GENIL_BOL_BROWSER 307 24.1 Objectif 308 24.2 Présentation de la transaction GENIL_BOL_BROWSER 308 24.2.1 1ère démonstration : Une requête générale 309 24.2.2 2ème démonstration : Une requête spécialisée 314 24.3 Conclusion 320 25 CHAPITRE 25 – Application du BOL dans le WEB UI 321 25.1 Le concept 322 25.2 La démonstration dans une application existante 322 25.2.1 Présentation de la vue BT108S_LEA/Result 326 25.2.2 Présentation de la gestion du nœud de contexte 326 25.3 L’utilisation dans la programmation des composants WEB UI 327 25.3.1 Le tableau des complexités dans le WEB UI. 327 25.3.2 Les exemples pratiques 328 25.4 Conclusion 332 26 CHAPITRE 26 – Application du BOL dans la SE80 333 26.1 Le concept 334 26.2 La démonstration par le module fonction 334 26.2.1 La première contrainte: 336 26.2.2 Deuxième contrainte: l’appel du module fonction 336 26.2.3 Troisième contrainte: la gestion des relations 337 26.3 La démonstration par les objets du BOL 338 26.4 Le débogage de la programmation par les objets du BOL 343 26.5 Le petit plus 351 26.6 Conclusion 352 27 ANNEXE A – La transaction ST05 353 27.1 Objectif 353 27.2 Le cas d’étude 353 27.3 La démonstration 353 27.4 Conclusion 362 28 ANNEXE B – La touche F1 363 28.1 Objectif 363 28.2 Le cas d’étude 363 28.3 La démonstration 363 28.4 Conclusion 365 29 ANNEXE C – Le code inspector et la transaction SE30 367 29.1 Objectif 367 29.2 Le cas d’étude 367 29.3 La démonstration 367 29.3.1 Le code inspector 367 29.3.2 La transaction SE30 370 29.4 Conclusion 372 30 ANNEXE D – Les exemples fournis par SAP 373 30.1 Objectif 373 30.2 Le cas d’étude 373 30.3 La démonstration 373 30.4 Conclusion 375 31 ANNEXE E – Les tables internes 377 31.1 Objectif 377 31.2 La théorie 377 31.3 La démonstration 378 31.3.1 Les tables standards 378 31.3.2 Les tables sorted 379 31.3.3 Les tables ashed 380 31.3.4 La gestion d’objets dans des tables internes 381 31.3.5 Les structures 382 31.3.6 Les types de tables 383 31.3.7 Les boucles (into et assigning) 385 31.3.8 La lecture unitaire 386 31.4 Conclusion 387 32 ANNEXE F – La BAPI 389 32.1 Objectif 389 32.2 Le cas d’étude 389 32.3 La démonstration 389 32.4 Conclusion 395 33 ANNEXE G – petit examen 397 33.1 Objectif 397 33.2 Description technique 397 33.3 Instructions 398 33.3.1 Ecran de sélection souhaité 398 33.3.2 Liste de résultat 398 33.3.3 Exemple de présentation 399 33.3.4 Interactivité (optionnel) 399 33.4 Conclusion 399 34 Liste des transactions utilisées 401 35 Glossaire 403

ABAP في SQL فهم و تطبيق

إتقان تطورها ومستقبلها
Author: Stephane LE GUEN,Yann SZWEC
Publisher: TYALGR
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 405
View: 4576
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Livre en arabe avec des impressions écrans en français. L’objectif de cet ouvrage est multiple, il va vous permettre : De maîtriser la syntaxe du SQL dans SAP, De comprendre l’utilité du SQL, son origine et ses différentes composantes, De comprendre son utilisation dans SAP, en différenciant la gestion des tables spécifiques des tables standards, De comprendre la spécificité de l’intégration des données dans le monde SAP par l’utilisation de BAPI, De se préparer à l’évolution de la programmation ABAP, le SQL étant impacté par la programmation objet et par le nouveau composant, le B.O.L. Que vous soyez consultant technique ou consultant fonctionnel, vous ne pouvez ignorer le SQL et son évolution qui font partie intégrante des programmes standards SAP.

SAPUI5 and Fiori. Status and Future Perspective


Author: Rohan Ahmed
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3668714533
Category: Computers
Page: 17
View: 7371
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Seminar paper from the year 2017 in the subject Computer Science - Commercial Information Technology, grade: 1.7, Heilbronn University, language: English, abstract: Today almost every software and websites has a mobile compatible version and everyone can check anything on his mobile or tablet. This wasn’t the case 7-8 years ago. For SAP, Graphical User Interface as known as GUI was very powerful at the time when SAP launched its ERP software. With time, many other software exists with the fleet of HTML5 based powerful and more appealing modern UI-technology. For this, the old GUI was not able to stand with it. As everyone knows, today are smartphones and tablets more powerful than pc’s. So, it was very important for SAP to find a solution and its was SAP Fiori – “One UX for all SAP Products”. Fiori is based on a framework known as SAPUI5 which is built on top of HTML5 and is compatible with any device and any screen size. The first announcement from SAP about Fiori was in May 2013 with the first release of 25 transactional Fiori apps for the most common business functions, such as self-services tasks which known as ESS/MSS. Today, there are more than 1140 true Fiori apps available in Fiori library. The number of apps can partially supplement the previous GUI transactions. SAP offers three types of Fiori apps with different database requirements. A distinction is made between Transactional apps, Analytical apps and factsheets. Only Transactional apps can run on any database that supports SAP ERP. The other 2 types require SAP HANA as database. Since 2013, Fiori has made great progress and will continue in the coming years.

Medea


Author: Eurípides
Publisher: Editorial Verbum
ISBN: 8490749132
Category:
Page: 48
View: 8650
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Fundamentos de sistemas de bases de datos


Author: Ramez Elmasri,Shamkant B. Navathe
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9788478290512
Category:
Page: 962
View: 5695
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Enterprise Services Architecture


Author: Dan Woods
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 9780596005511
Category: Computers
Page: 205
View: 1748
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This work outlines a disciplined and structured approach to understanding how modern enterprise applications will make use of Web services. It presents a forward-looking architecture that can meet future development challenges with ease and agility.

Getting Started with SAPUI5


Author: Miroslav Antolovic
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781592299690
Category: Computers
Page: 462
View: 684
DOWNLOAD NOW »
SAPUI5 has quickly become the open-source programming language with the best options for responsive and versatile SAP app development. So how well do you speak SAPUI5, and what can you do with it? This book can helps you learn to develop next-generation UIs for mobile-ready, data source-agnostic, client-side SAP applications.

Java Report


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Java (Computer program language)
Page: N.A
View: 8168
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Más agudo, más rápido y mejor

Los secretos para ser más productivo en la vida y en el trabajo
Author: Charles Duhigg
Publisher: CONECTA
ISBN: 8416029768
Category: Psychology
Page: 448
View: 5259
DOWNLOAD NOW »
En Más agudo, más rápido y mejor, el periodista ganador del premio Pulitzer Charles Duhigg nos desvela los avances de la ciencia de la productividad de forma clara y práctica, y nos explica por qué es más importante controlar cómo pensamos que el propio contenido de nuestras reflexiones. A partir de ocho conceptos clave que van desde la motivación y el establecimiento de objetivos hasta la toma de decisiones, Charles Duhigg nos enseña en Más agudo, más rápido y mejor por qué algunas personas y empresas consiguen ser más productivas que otras, y cómo deberíamos actuar para mejorar y conseguir nuestros objetivos con menos estrés y esfuerzo. En definitiva, ser más agudos, más rápidos y mejores en todo lo que hacemos. Fundamentado en los últimos descubrimientos en neurociencia, psicología y psicoeconomía, así como en las experiencias vividas por profesionales de diversos ámbitos como agentes del FBI, pilotos comerciales, directores generales, y altos mandos del ejército, este libro constituye la herramienta perfecta para que nuestra vida laboral y personal sea mucho más fructífera y agradable. «La productividad tiene que ver sobre todo con elegir ciertas opciones de ciertas maneras. El modo en que decidimos vernos a nosotros mismos y encuadrar las decisiones cotidianas, las historias que nos contamos y los objetivos fáciles que ignoramos, el sentimiento de comunidad que inculcamos en nuestros compañeros de equipo y la cultura creativa que establecemos como líderes, todo esto es lo que diferencia a las personas simplemente ocupadas de las realmente productivas.» Charles Duhigg Reseñas: «Una lectura imprescindible para todos los que deseen ser más productivos (y de forma más creativa).» Jim Collins, autor de Empresas que sobresalen «Charles Duhigg es un buen narrador que posee una singular habilidad para combinar ciencia social, reportajes detallados y anécdotas muy entretenidas.» The Economist «Más agudo, más rápido y mejor ofrece grandes lecciones. Duhigg es un excelente narrador y un maestro cuyas palabras atrapan al lector.» The Financial Times

Dataquest

DQ.
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Computer software
Page: N.A
View: 839
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Informationweek


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Computer service industry
Page: N.A
View: 8698
DOWNLOAD NOW »


Universal Worklist with SAP NetWeaver Portal


Author: Darren Hague
Publisher: Espresso Tutorials GmbH
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 272
View: 6398
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This comprehensive technical guide shows developers, technical consultants, and solution architects all the ins and outs of the Universal Worklist in SAP NetWeaver Portal. This hands-on workshop takes you, step by step, from standard configuration to working with different user interfaces and covers workflow integration from any back-end systems. Readers get an exclusive look under the hood of the Universal Worklist functionality and gain insight on future application scenarios. By reading this guide you will be able to reconfigure existing applications to conform with the UWL, write UWL-specific applications or transactions and adapt data sets in order to have the appropriate work item IDs created. Many screenshots and code samples illustrate the processes in detail, allowing you work with the UWL functionality appropriately - just as you will soon be doing in your daily work. Highlights: - Standard UWL configuration: Connecting SAP systems, items in the UWL, changing the basic look - Customizing UWL: Custom views, custom work item handlers - Integrating other types of workflow: Ad-hoc workflow, publishing workflow, 3rd party workflow - UWL behind the scenes: Performance tuning, working around limitations, SAP function modules