Nickelodeon Nation

... 62 Nickelodeon in the CIS and Baltic Republics, 61 Nickelodeon in the Philippines, 61–62 Nickelodeon Latin America, 61 Nickelodeon Magazine, 55–57 “Nickelodeon Nation” promotional campaign, 224 Nickelodeon Studios, 62 Nickelodeon UK ...

Author: Heather Hendershot

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814736524

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 282

View: 909

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In the first comprehensive study of election law since the Supreme Court decided Bush v. Gore, Richard L. Hasen rethinks the Court’s role in regulating elections. Drawing on the case files of the Warren, Burger, and Rehnquist courts, Hasen roots the Court’s intervention in political process cases to the landmark 1962 case, Baker v. Carr. The case opened the courts to a variety of election law disputes, to the point that the courts now control and direct major aspects of the American electoral process. The Supreme Court does have a crucial role to play in protecting a socially constructed “core” of political equality principles, contends Hasen, but it should leave contested questions of political equality to the political process itself. Under this standard, many of the Court’s most important election law cases from Baker to Bush have been wrongly decided.
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Kids Rule

Going to Celebration I believe in Nick 'cause Nick believes in me Nickelodeon Nation! The color print ads usually featured only one child, caught in a candid moment of laughing or playing, and included large orange print that said ...

Author: Sarah Banet-Weiser

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822390299

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 296

View: 800

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In Kids Rule! Sarah Banet-Weiser examines the cable network Nickelodeon in order to rethink the relationship between children, media, citizenship, and consumerism. Nickelodeon is arguably the most commercially successful cable network ever. Broadcasting original programs such as Dora the Explorer, SpongeBob SquarePants, and Rugrats (and producing related movies, Web sites, and merchandise), Nickelodeon has worked aggressively to claim and maintain its position as the preeminent creator and distributor of television programs for America’s young children, tweens, and teens. Banet-Weiser argues that a key to its success is its construction of children as citizens within a commercial context. The network’s self-conscious engagement with kids—its creation of a “Nickelodeon Nation” offering choices and empowerment within a world structured by rigid adult rules—combines an appeal to kids’ formidable purchasing power with assertions of their political and cultural power. Banet-Weiser draws on interviews with nearly fifty children as well as with network professionals; coverage of Nickelodeon in both trade and mass media publications; and analysis of the network’s programs. She provides an overview of the media industry within which Nickelodeon emerged in the early 1980s as well as a detailed investigation of its brand-development strategies. She also explores Nickelodeon’s commitment to “girl power,” its ambivalent stance on multiculturalism and diversity, and its oft-remarked appeal to adult viewers. Banet-Weiser does not condemn commercial culture nor dismiss the opportunities for community and belonging it can facilitate. Rather she contends that in the contemporary media environment, the discourses of political citizenship and commercial citizenship so thoroughly inform one another that they must be analyzed in tandem. Together they play a fundamental role in structuring children’s interactions with television.
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Anytime Playdate

The history of Nickelodeon benefited from an interview with Geraldine Laybourne as well as essays in Nickelodeon Nation: The History, Politics and Economics ofAmerica's Only TV Channel for Kids, Heather Hendershot, ed., ...

Author: Dade Hayes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416564331

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 304

View: 259

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In this eye-opening book, the first to investigate the explosion of the multibillion-dollar preschool entertainment business and its effects on families, Dade Hayes -- an entertainment expert, author, and concerned father -- lifts the veil on the closely guarded process of marketing to the ultra-young and their parents. Like many parents, Dade Hayes grabbed "me time" by plopping his daughter in front of the TV, relaxing while Margot delighted in the sights and sounds of Barney and the Teletubbies. But when Margot got hooked, screaming whenever the TV was turned off, Hayes set out to explore the vast universe of this industry in which preschoolers devour $21 billion worth of entertainment. Going behind the scenes to talk with executives, writers, and marketers who see the value of educational TV, Hayes finds compelling research that watching TV may raise IQs and increase vocabularies. On the other side, he brings in the voices of pediatricians and child psychologists who warn against "babysitter TV" and ask whether "TV trance" is healthy -- in spite of the relaxation that the lull affords exhausted parents -- as recent studies link early television viewing with obesity, attention and cognitive problems, and violence. Along the way, Hayes narrates the fascinating evolution of Nickelodeon's bilingual preschool gamble, Ni Hao, Kai-lan, from an art student's Internet doodles to its final product: an educationally fortified, Dora-inflected, test audience-approved television show. At the show's debut, jittery experts hold their breath as the tweaked and researched Kai-lan faces Mr. Potato Head in the battle for a three-year-old's attention. Anytime Playdate reveals the marketing science of capturing a toddler's attention, examining whether Baby Einstein and its ilk will make babies smarter, or if, conversely, television makes babies passive and uncritical, their imaginations colonized by marketing schemes before they even speak. It tells us why the raucous Dora the Explorer has usurped Blues Clues for preschool primacy, why the Brit hit In the Night Garden won't follow Teletubbies into American tot stardom, and why the comparatively quiet and wholesome Sesame Street has reigned for decades. Hayes vividly portrays the educators, psychologists, executives, parents, and, lest we forget, kids who have shaped the history of children's television, uncovering the tensions between the many personalities, the creative foment that combines story, music, and message in this medium to produce today's almost dizzying array of products and choices. In the end, Hayes gives readers a provocative but balanced portrait of an age in technological transition, and shows that what's at stake in the "Rattle Battle" is nothing less than the character of the next generation.
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Cable Visions

In effect, the campaign for the “Nickelodeon Nation” amounted to a campaign for a network for the “nation.” This theme was particularly effective in the context of intense competition for brand recognition within the television ...

Author: Sarah Banet-Weiser

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799505

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 376

View: 697

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Looks beyond broadcasting's mainstream, toward cable's alternatives, to critically consider the capacity of commercial media to serve the public interest. This work offers an overview of the industry's history and regulatory trends, case studies of cable newcomers aimed at niche markets, and analyses of programming forms introduced by cable TV.
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Race in American Television Voices and Visions that Shaped a Nation 2 volumes

“Diversifying Representation in Children's TV: Nickelodeon's Model.” In Nickelodeon Nation: The History, Politics, and Economics of America's Only TV Channel for Kids, edited by Heather Hendershot, 120–133. New York: New York University ...

Author: David J. Leonard

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440843068

Category: Social Science

Page: 805

View: 901

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This two-volume encyclopedia explores representations of people of color in American television. It includes overview essays on early, classic, and contemporary television and the challenges, developments, and participation of people of color on and behind the screen. Covering five decades, this encyclopedia highlights how race has shaped television and how television has shaped society. Offering critical analysis of moments and themes throughout television history, Race in American Television shines a spotlight on key artists of color, prominent shows, and the debates that have defined television since the Civil Rights Movement. This book also examines the ways in which television has been a site for both reproduction of stereotypes and resistance to them, providing a basis for discussion about American racial issues. This set provides a significant resource for students and fans of television alike, not only educating but also empowering readers with the necessary tools to consume and watch the small screen and explore its impact on the evolution of racial and ethnic stereotypes in U.S. culture and beyond. Understanding the history of American television contributes to deeper knowledge and potentially helps us to better apprehend the plethora of diverse shows and programs on Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and other platforms today. Offers accessible yet critical discussions of television culture Provides historic understanding of the contributions of significant artists of color to the history of American television Discusses a diversity of shows as well as debates and themes central to the history of American television
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Teens TV and Tunes

5 Nickelodeon Nation Building: From Clarissa Explains It All to Zoey 101 For Kids Only: Nickelodeon and “Children's TV” Nickelodeon's brand identity is not without contradictions. Sarah BanetWeiser pointed out that “[Nickelodeon] can ...

Author: Doyle Greene

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786489725

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 504

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This political analysis of teen culture examines the historical and ideological development of American youth society, the economic and ideological relationship between television and popular music, and the ideological rivalry between Nickelodeon and Disney. More than mere entertainment, teen sitcoms and pop music portray a complex and often contradictory set of cultural discourses. They engage in a process of ideology marketing and “hip versus square” politics. Case studies include Saved by the Bell, Britney Spears, the movie School of Rock, early “pop music sitcoms” like The Monkees and The Partridge Family, and recent staples of teen culture such as iCarly and Hannah Montana. What is occurring in teen culture has a crucial bearing as today’s teens age into adulthood and become the dominant generation in the impending decades.
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Tween Pop

This trope of children's fantastical public music consumption reappeared in another ad campaign in the late 1990, when the cable television channel Nickelodeon rebranded itself around the tagline “Nickelodeon Nation.

Author: Tyler Bickford

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9781478009177

Category: Music

Page: 240

View: 682

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In the early years of the twenty-first century, the US music industry created a new market for tweens, selling music that was cooler than Barney, but that still felt safe for children. In Tween Pop Tyler Bickford traces the dramatic rise of the “tween” music industry, showing how it marshaled childishness as a key element in legitimizing children's participation in public culture. The industry played on long-standing gendered and racialized constructions of childhood as feminine and white—both central markers of innocence and childishness. In addition to Kidz Bop, High School Musical, and the Disney Channel's music programs, Bickford examines Taylor Swift in relation to girlhood and whiteness, Justin Bieber's childish immaturity, and Miley Cyrus/Hannah Montana and postfeminist discourses of work-life balance. In outlining how tween pop imagined and positioned childhood as both intimate and public as well as a cultural identity to be marketed to, Bickford demonstrates the importance of children's music to core questions of identity politics, consumer culture, and the public sphere.
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The Children s Television Community

Nickelodeon grows up:The economicevolution ofa network. In H. Hendershot(Ed.), Nickelodeon nation (pp. 15–44). New York: New York University Press. Piaget, J.,& Inhelder, B. (1969). The psychology ofthe child. New York: BasicBooks.

Author: J. Alison Bryant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135250751

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 723

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The Children’s Television Community presents a cutting-edge analysis of the children’s television community—the organizations, major players, and approaches to programming—and gives an overview of the history, current state, and future of children’s programming. Leading children’s television professionals and distinguished academicians come together in this volume to take a distinctive behind-the-scenes look at how children’s television is created, programmed, and sold. This thought-provoking work emphasizes the various actors whose creative, financial, political, and critical input go into children’s television, and addresses advocacy for children’s television from multiple approaches. By blending these diverse perspectives, editor J. Alison Bryant offers readers a comprehensive picture of children’s television. Highlights include: * a community level approach to understanding children’s television; * perspectives from colleagues in various aspects of the media industry; and * an eye-opening analysis of how decision-making affects what children are exposed to through television. The Children’s Television Community is highly informative for educators, industry professionals, and practitioners in media, developmental psychology, and education.
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From Networks to Netflix

“Mom Shows Hurt Nick Jr.” The Wall Street Journal, October 12. www.wsj.com/articles/SB10000872396390443749204578052881834903510. Jenkins, Henry. 2004. “Interview with Geraldine Laybourne.” In Nickelodeon Nation: The History, Politics, ...

Author: Derek Johnson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317331667

Category: Social Science

Page: 430

View: 601

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Even as the television industry experiences significant transformation and disruption in the face of streaming and online delivery, the television channel itself persists. If anything, the television channel landscape has become more complex to navigate as viewers can now choose between broadcast, cable, streaming, and premium services across a host of different platforms and devices. From Networks to Netflix provides an authoritative answer to that navigational need, helping students, instructors, and scholars understand these industrial changes through the lens of the channel. Through examination of emerging services like Hulu and Amazon Prime Video, investigation of YouTube channels and cable outlets like Freeform and Comedy Central, and critiques of broadcast giants like ABC and PBS, this book offers a concrete, tangible means of exploring the foundations of a changing industry.
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Screen Time

7 Chapter by Anderson in Hendershot, ed., Nickelodeon Nation, 2004, p. 242. 8 Eliot, 1999, p. 340. 9 Ibid., p. 216. 10 Interview with John Richards, cognitive and developmental scientist at the University of South Carolina, March 6, ...

Author: Lisa Guernsey

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465031344

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 746

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As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Academy of Pediatrics: no TV at all before the age of two. But like many parents, she wanted straight answers and realistic advice, so she kept digging: she visited infant-perception labs and child development centers around the country. She interviewed scores of parents, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and media researchers, as well as programming executives at Noggin, Disney, Nickelodeon, Sesame Workshop, and PBS. Much of what she found flies in the face of conventional wisdom and led her to conclude that new parents will be best served by focusing on &"the three C’s”: content, context, and the individual child. Into the Minds of Babes is a fascinating book that points out how little credible research exists to support the AAP's dire recommendation. Parents, teachers, and psychologists will be relieved to learn positive approaches to using videos with young children and will be empowered to make their own informed choices.
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