Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity

Many recent discoveries have confirmed the importance of Orphism for ancient Greek religion, philosophy, and literature.

Author: Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110206333

Category: Philosophy

Page: 442

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Many recent discoveries have confirmed the importance of Orphism for ancient Greek religion, philosophy, and literature. However, its nature and role are still very controversial. The key problem of its relationship to Christianity has been discussed by ancient and modern authors from many different viewpoints, albeit too often tainted with apologetic interests and unconscious projections. This free and thorough study of the ancient sources sheds light on these questions and illuminates the complexity of the encounter between Classical culture and Jewish-Christian tradition. New perspectives on the relationship between Classical and Jewish-Christian culture On the avowed subject of Orphism Author is specialist within the field
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Monotheism Between Pagans and Christians in Late Antiquity

This volume studies how similarities between paganism and Christianity were obscured in the polemic that was waged by Christianity against paganism and in the pagan responses to it.

Author: Stephen Mitchell

Publisher: Peeters Pub & Booksellers

ISBN: IND:30000127514580

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 816

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This volume studies how similarities between paganism and Christianity were obscured in the polemic that was waged by Christianity against paganism and in the pagan responses to it.
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New Perspectives on Late Antiquity

2010, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, Berlin-New York (Spanish original version: Tradición órfica y cristianismo antiguo, Madrid 2007).

Author: David Hernández de la Fuente

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443828093

Category: History

Page: 520

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Perhaps it is fully justified to think of Late Antiquity (3rd–7th centuries) as the first Renaissance of the Classical World. This period can be considered a fundamental landmark for the transmission of the Classical Legacy and the transition between the ancient and the medieval individual. During Late Antiquity the Classical Education or enkyklios paideia of Hellenism was linked definitively to the Judeo-Christian and Germanic elements that have modelled the Western World. The present volume combines diverse interests and methodologies with a single purpose—unity and diversity, as a Neo-Platonic motto—providing an overall picture of the new means of researching Late Antiquity. This collective endeavour, stemming from the 2009 1st International Congress on Late Antiquity in Segovia (Spain), focuses not only on the analysis of new materials and latest findings, but rather puts together different perspectives offering a scientific update and a dialogue between several disciplines. New Perspectives on Late Antiquity contains two main sections—1. Ancient History and Archaeology, and 2. Philosophy and Classical Studies—including both overview papers and case studies. Among the contributors to this volume are some of the most relevant scholars in their fields, including P. Brown, J. Alvar, P. Barceló, C. Codoñer, F. Fronterotta, D. Gigli, F. Lisi and R. Sanz.
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Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry

... microcosm with macrocosm, in a Christian Pythagoreanism or a Christian Orphism. ... 5 Innovations of Late Antiquity Novelty and Renouatio Late antiquity ...

Author: Philip Hardie

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520295773

Category: Religion

Page: 304

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After centuries of near silence, Latin poetry underwent a renaissance in the late fourth and fifth centuries CE evidenced in the works of key figures such as Ausonius, Claudian, Prudentius, and Paulinus of Nola. This period of resurgence marked a milestone in the reception of the classics of late Republican and early imperial poetry. In Classicism and Christianity in Late Antique Latin Poetry, Philip Hardie explores the ways in which poets writing on non-Christian and Christian subjects used the classical traditions of Latin poetry to construct their relationship with Rome’s imperial past and present, and with the by now not-so-new belief system of the state religion, Christianity. The book pays particular attention to the themes of concord and discord, the "cosmic sense" of late antiquity, novelty and renouatio, paradox and miracle, and allegory. It is also a contribution to the ongoing discussion of whether there is an identifiably late antique poetics and a late antique practice of intertextuality. Not since Michael Robert's classic The Jeweled Style has a single book had so much to teach about the enduring power of Latin poetry in late antiquity.
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The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion

Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity. Berlin. Hopfner, T. [1921, 1924] repr. 1974, 1983, 1990. Griechisch-ägyptischer Offenbarungszauber. 2 vols in 3.

Author: Esther Eidinow

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191058073

Category: Religion

Page: 736

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This handbook offers both students and teachers of ancient Greek religion a comprehensive overview of the current state of scholarship in the subject, from the Archaic to the Hellenistic periods. It not only presents key information, but also explores the ways in which such information is gathered and the different approaches that have shaped the area. In doing so, the volume provides a crucial research and orientation tool for students of the ancient world, and also makes a vital contribution to the key debates surrounding the conceptualization of ancient Greek religion. The handbook's initial chapters lay out the key dimensions of ancient Greek religion, approaches to evidence, and the representations of myths. The following chapters discuss the continuities and differences between religious practices in different cultures, including Egypt, the Near East, the Black Sea, and Bactria and India. The range of contributions emphasizes the diversity of relationships between mortals and the supernatural - in all their manifestations, across, between, and beyond ancient Greek cultures - and draws attention to religious activities as dynamic, highlighting how they changed over time, place, and context.
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Pagan Monotheism in Late Antiquity

In this book distinguished experts from a range of disciplines (Orientalists, philologists, philosophers, theologians and historians) address a central problem which lies at the heart of the religious and philosophical debate of late ...

Author: Polymnia Athanassiadi

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191541452

Category: Religion

Page: 220

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In this book distinguished experts from a range of disciplines (Orientalists, philologists, philosophers, theologians and historians) address a central problem which lies at the heart of the religious and philosophical debate of late antiquity. Paganism was not a unified tradition and consequently the papers cover a wide social and intellectual spectrum. Particular emphasis is given to several aspects of the topic: first, monotheistic belief in late antique philosophical ideals and its roots in classical antiquity and the Near East; second, monistic Gnosticism; third, the revelatory tradition as expressed in oracular literature; and finally, the monotheistic trend in popular religion.
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Graphic Signs of Authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages 300 900

The Trustees of the British Museum. represent a symbiosis of Bacchic (presumably Orphic) and Christian motifs.” In both cases, the chi-rho might have been ...

Author: Ildar Garipzanov

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192546616

Category: History

Page: 368

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Graphic Signs of Authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages presents a cultural history of graphic signs and examines how they were employed to communicate secular and divine authority in the late antique Mediterranean and early medieval Europe. Visual materials such as the sign of the cross, christograms, monograms, and other such devices, are examined against the backdrop of the cultural, religious, and socio-political transition from the late Graeco-Roman world to that of medieval Europe. This monograph is a synthetic study of graphic visual evidence from a wide range of material media that have rarely been studied collectively, including various mass-produced items and unique objects of art, architectural monuments and epigraphic inscriptions, as well as manuscripts and charters. This study promises to provide a timely reference tool for historians, art historians, archaeologists, epigraphists, manuscript scholars, and numismatists.
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Praying and Contemplating in Late Antiquity

"The present volume is focused on the interactions and syncretistic tensions between religion and philosophy in Late Antiquity.

Author: Eleni Pachoumi

Publisher:

ISBN: 3161565940

Category: Contemplation

Page: 229

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Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy

Keresztes, P. (1979) 'The Imperial Roman Government and the Christian Church I. From Nero to the Severi', ... LateAntique Religion and Culture 5, 14–40.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004429567

Category: Religion

Page: 358

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The essays in Eastern Christianity and Late Antique Philosophy provide valuable insights into the central role of philosophical ideas in a period when paganism was in decline and Eastern Christians were forging their community identities.
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Nonnus of Panopolis in Context

Yet, Nonnus accomplished an ambitious plan, in two parts, aiming at representing world-history. This volume consists mainly of the Proceedings of the First International Conference on Nonnus held in Rethymno, Crete in May 2011.

Author: Konstantinos Spanoudakis

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110339420

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 584

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Nonnus of Panopolis (fifth century CE) composed two poems once thought to be incompatible: the Dionysiaca, a mythological long epic with a marked interest in astrology, the occult, the paradox and not least the beauty of the female body, and a pious and sublime Paraphrase of the Gospel of St John. Little is known about the man, to whom sundry identities have been attached. The longer work has been misrepresented as a degenerate poem or as a mythological handbook. The Christian poem has been neglected or undervalued. Yet, Nonnus accomplished an ambitious plan, in two parts, aiming at representing world-history. This volume consists mainly of the Proceedings of the First International Conference on Nonnus held in Rethymno, Crete in May 2011. With twentyfour essays, an international team of specialists place Nonnus firmly in his time's context. After an authoritative Introduction by Pierre Chuvin, chapters on Nonnus and the literary past, the visual arts, Late Antique paideia, Christianity and his immediate and long-range afterlife (to modern times) offer a wide-ranging and innovative insight into the man and his world. The volume moves on beyond stereotypes to inaugurate a new era of research for Nonnus and Late Antique poetics on the whole.
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Theurgy in Late Antiquity

Ilinca Tanaseanu-Döbler examines the development of the discourse on theurgy, attempting to reconstruct what was understood as theurgic ritual in the late antique sources.

Author: Ilinca Tanaseanu-Döbler

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783525540206

Category: Religion

Page: 325

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Theurgy is commonly taken to denote a complex of rites which are based on the so-called Chaldean Oracles, a collection of oracles in hexameters, which were probably composed during the late 2nd century AD. These rituals are mostly known through Neoplatonic sources, who engage in a passionate debate about their relevance to the salvation of the soul and thus to the philosopher’s ultimate goal. Ilinca Tanaseanu-Döbler examines the development of the discourse on theurgy, attempting to reconstruct what was understood as theurgic ritual in the late antique sources. Withstanding the temptation to impose a unity on the disparate sources which span several centuries, she thus goes beyond the picture of a coherent, extra-philosophical tradition drawn by the Neoplatonists to sketch the variations in the rituals subsumed under ‘theurgy’ and their function, and shows how every author constructs his own ‘theurgy’. This perspective leads to consider theurgy as an example of an ‘artificial’ ritual tradition, composed from already existing elements to create something claimed as sui generis. Theurgy offers the great opportunity to look at such a tradition from its beginning up to its end and to analyse the mechanisms of inventing and reinventing such a ritual tradition in process.
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Dionysus in Late Antiquity Clement of Alexandria and Nonnus of Panopolis in Dialogue

Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject Philosophy - Philosophy of the Ancient World, grade: 65, University College London (UCL), language: English, abstract: The early Christian writers, in constructing a worldview in continuation ...

Author: Niovi Gkioka

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783668170711

Category: Philosophy

Page: 13

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Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject Philosophy - Philosophy of the Ancient World, grade: 65, University College London (UCL), language: English, abstract: The early Christian writers, in constructing a worldview in continuation with the Old Testament, were inevitably faced with the challenge of the widespread Greek culture, and in particular of the Greek religion. Specifically, of all the Greek gods, the most vexing seems to have been Dionysus, who in striking parallel with Christ is a resurrected god – according to the Zagreus mythic tradition – has universal aspirations for his cult, was the offspring of a mortal mother and a god, performs miracles, and not least, has wine as a sacred element in his ritual observances. These analogies between Dionysus and Christ, which make their thematic comparison fitting, were first exploited by Paul in ca. 54 CE. In his epistles to Corinthians his language reflects Dionysian cults in places (1 Cor 12:2) and notably, the consumption of wine in private meetings is rendered in distinctively Dionysian phraseology (1 Cor 11:17-34). Similarly, as Richard Seaford has asserted, weighing in on the long-standing debate of the similarities between the Acts and the “Bacchae” first documented by Wilhelm Nestle in his 1900 article ‘Anklänge an Euripides in der Apostelgeschichte,’ the Acts and the Bacchae feature too many affinities, and at key points – Paul’s conversion (Acts 9:3-7; 22:6-11; 26:12-18) and Paul and Silas’ prison escape (Acts 16:19-40) – to be taken as mere coincidence. These very parallels between Dionysus and Christ were drawn more distinctively in the second and third century CE by Greek and Latin Apologists; that is Christian intellectuals who writing in defence of Christianity assumed a polemic stance against Dionysus.
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Dionysus and Politics

This volume presents an essential but underestimated role that Dionysus played in Greek and Roman political thought.

Author: Filip Doroszewski

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000392418

Category: History

Page: 232

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This volume presents an essential but underestimated role that Dionysus played in Greek and Roman political thought. Written by an interdisciplinary team of scholars, the volume covers the period from archaic Greece to the late Roman Empire. The reader can observe how ideas and political themes rooted in Greek classical thought were continued, adapted and developed over the course of history. The authors (including four leading experts in the field: Cornelia Isler-Kerényi, Jean-Marie Pailler, Richard Seaford andRichard Stoneman) reconstruct the political significance of Dionysus by examining different types of evidence: historiography, poetry, coins, epigraphy, art and philosophy. They discuss the place of the god in Greek city-state politics, explore the long tradition of imitating Dionysus that ancient leaders, from Alexander the Great to the Roman emperors, manifested in various ways, and shows how the political role of Dionysus was reflected in Orphism and Neoplatonist philosophy. Dionysus and Politics provides an excellent introduction to a fundamental feature of ancient political thought which until now has been largely neglected by mainstream academia. The book will be an invaluable resource to students and scholars interested in ancient politics and religion.
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Education Religion and Literary Culture in the 4th Century CE

... the Orphic Argonautica, a late antique epic, the Orphic hymns, most probably products of the awakening interest in the lore associated with Orpheus in ...

Author: Gabriela Ryser

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783647573212

Category: History

Page: 446

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This book contextualizes Claudian’s handling of the Proserpina myth and the underworld in the history of literature and religion while showing intersections with and differences between the literary and religious uses of the underworld topos. In doing so, the study provides an incentive to rethink the dichotomy of the terms ‘religious’ and ‘non-religious’ in favour of a more nuanced model of references and refunctionalisations of elements which are, or could be, religiously connotated. A close philological analysis of De raptu Proserpinae identifies the sphere of myth and poetry as an area of expressive freedom, a parallel universe to theological discourses (whether they be pagan-philosophical or Christian), while the profound understanding and skilful use of this particular sphere – a formative aspect of European religious and intellectual history – is postulated as a characteristic of the educated Roman and of Claudian’s poetry.
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The Genres of Late Antique Christian Poetry

The Orphic poems Oxford. → Whitby, Mary/Roberts, M. 2018. “Epic poetry”, in S. McGill/E.J. Watts (eds.), Blackwell's Companion to late antique literature ...

Author: Fotini Hadjittofi

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110696233

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 345

View: 838

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Classicizing Christian poetry has largely been neglected by literary scholars, but has recently been receiving growing attention, especially the poetry written in Latin. One of the objectives of this volume is to redress the balance by allowing more space to discussions of Greek Christian poetry. The contributions collected here ask how Christian poets engage with (and are conscious of) the double reliance of their poetry on two separate systems: on the one hand, the classical poetic models and, on the other, the various genres and sub-genres of Christian prose. Keeping in mind the different settings of the Greek-speaking East and the Latin-speaking West, the contributions seek to understand the impact of historical setting on genre, the influence of the paideia shared by authors and audiences, and the continued relevance of traditional categories of literary genre. While our immediate focus is genre, most of the contributions also engage with the ideological ramifications of the transposition of Christian themes into classicizing literature. This volume offers important and original case studies on the reception and appropriation of the classical past and its literary forms by Christian poetry.
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Christians Gnostics and Philosophers in Late Antiquity

Such examples are indeed superfluous, for what Jew or Christian did not think it ... than ours;29 (4) at least one Orphic fragment, known to be a forgery, ...

Author: Mark Edwards

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351219129

Category: Religion

Page: 330

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Gnosticism, Christianity and late antique philosophy are often studied separately; when studied together they are too often conflated. These articles set out to show that we misunderstand all three phenomena if we take either approach. We cannot interpret, or even identify, Christian Gnosticism without Platonic evidence; we may even discover that Gnosticism throws unexpected light on the Platonic imagination. At the same time, if we read writers like Origen simply as Christian Platonists, or bring Christians and philosophers together under the porous umbrella of "monotheism", we ignore fundamental features of both traditions. To grasp what made Christianity distinctive, we must look at the questions asked in the studies here, not merely what Christians appropriated but how it was appropriated. What did the pagan gods mean to a Christian poet of the fifth century? What did Paul quote when he thought he was quoting Greek poetry? What did Socrates mean to the Christians, and can we trust their memories when they appeal to lost fragments of the Presocratics? When pagans accuse the Christians of moral turpitude, do they know more or less about them than we do? What divides Augustine, the disenchanted Platonist, from his Neoplatonic contemporaries? And what God or gods await the Neoplatonist when he dies?
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The Making of Christian Communities in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

... have surprised no educated person in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ... can produce the documentation for Orphic claims seems to me justified.

Author: Mark F. Williams

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 9781898855774

Category: History

Page: 193

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The Making of Christian Communities sheds light on one of the most crucial periods in the development of the Christian faith. It considers the development and spread of Christianity between Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, and includes analysis of the formation and development of Christian communities in a variety of arenas, ranging from Late Roman Cappadocia and Constantinople to the court of Charlemagne and the twelfth-century province of Rheims, France during the twelfth century. The rise and development of Christianity in the Roman and Post-Roman world has been exhaustively studied on many different levels, political, legal, social, literary and religious. However, the basic question of how Christians of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages formed themselves into communities of believers has sometimes been lost from sight. This volume explores the idea that survival of the Christian faith depended upon the making of these communities, something that the Christians of this period were themselves acutely - and sometimes acrimoniously - aware.
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Orphic Tradition and the Birth of the Gods

While the Christian apologists interpreted the texts literally and focused on the most ... in late antiquity used these texts to represent Greek tradition.

Author: Dwayne A. Meisner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190663537

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 316

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The hatching of the Cosmic Egg, the swallowing of Phanes by Zeus, and the murder of Dionysus by the Titans were just a few of the many stories that appeared in ancient Greek epic poems that were thought to have been written by the legendary singer Orpheus. Most of this poetry is now lost, surviving only in the form of brief quotations by Greek philosophers. Orphic Tradition and the Birth of the Gods brings together the scattered fragments of four Orphic theogonies: the Derveni, Eudemian, Hieronyman, and Rhapsodic theogonies. Typically, theogonies are thought to be poetic accounts of the creation of the universe and the births of the gods, leading to the creation of humans and the establishment of the present state of the cosmos. The most famous example is Hesiod's Theogony, which unlike the Orphic theogonies has survived. But did Orphic theogonies look anything like Hesiod's Theogony? Meisner applies a new theoretical model for studying Orphic theogonies and suggests certain features that characterize them as different from Hesiod: the blending of Near Eastern narrative elements that are missing in Hesiod; the probability that these were short hymns, more like the Homeric Hymnsr than Hesiod; and the continuous discourse between myth and philosophy that can be seen in Orphic poems and the philosophers who quote them. Most importantly, this book argues that the Orphic myths of Phanes emerging from the Cosmic Egg and Zeus swallowing Phanes are at least as important as the well-known myth of Dionysus being dismembered by the Titans, long thought to have been the central myth of Orphism. As this book amply demonstrates, Orphic literature was a diverse and ever-changing tradition by which authors were able to think about the most current philosophical ideas through the medium of the most traditional poetic forms.
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Divine Powers in Late Antiquity

He has published many articles and book chapters on Orphism and Greek religion and is also the co-editor of Tracing Orpheus: Studies of Orphic Fragments ...

Author: Anna Marmodoro

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191079955

Category: Religion

Page: 280

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Is power the essence of divinity, or are divine powers distinct from divine essence? Are they divine hypostases or are they divine attributes? Are powers such as omnipotence, omniscience, etc. modes of divine activity? How do they manifest? In which way can we apprehend them? Is there a multiplicity of gods whose powers fill the cosmos or is there only one God from whom all power(s) derive(s) and whose power(s) permeate(s) everything? These are questions that become central to philosophical and theological debates in Late Antiquity (roughly corresponding to the period 2nd to the 6th centuries). On the one hand, the Pagan Neoplatonic thinkers of this era postulate a complex hierarchy of gods, whose powers express the unlimited power of the ineffable One. On the other hand, Christians proclaim the existence of only one God, one divine power or one 'Lord of all powers'. Divided into two main sections, the first part of Divine Powers in Late Antiquity examines aspects of the notion of divine power as developed by the four major figures of Neoplatonism: Plotinus (c. 204-270), Porphyry (c. 234-305), Iamblichus (c.245-325), and Proclus (412-485). It focuses on an aspect of the notion of divine power that has been so far relatively neglected in the literature. Part two investigates the notion of divine power in early Christian authors, from the New Testament to the Alexandrian school (Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Athanasius the Great) and, further, to the Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa), as well as in some of these authors' sources (the Septuagint, Philo of Alexandria). The traditional view tends to overlook the fact that the Bible, particularly the New Testament, was at least as important as Platonic philosophical texts in the shaping of the early Christian thinking about the Church's doctrines. Whilst challenging the received interpretation by redressing the balance between the Bible and Greek philosophical texts, the essays in the second section of this book nevertheless argue for the philosophical value of early Christian reflections on the notion of divine power. The two groups of thinkers that each of the sections deal with (the Platonic-Pagan and the Christian one) share largely the same intellectual and cultural heritage; they are concerned with the same fundamental questions; and they often engage in more or less public philosophical and theological dialogue, directly influencing one another.
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