Ortelius Atlas Maps

Author: M. P. R. van den Broecke

Publisher: Hes & De Graff Pub B V

ISBN: UOM:39015040565940

Category: Science

Page: 308

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Ortelius Atlas

The "Theatrum" was originally published in 1570 and is considered to be the first modern atlas. The information is provided online by the Geography and Maps Division of the U.S. Library of Congress, as part of the American Memory resource.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:45356540

Category: Atlases

Page:

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Frans Koks discusses various editions of the "Theatrum Orbis Terrarum," an atlas created by Flemish cartographer Abraham Oertel, also known as Ortelius, (1527-1598). The "Theatrum" was originally published in 1570 and is considered to be the first modern atlas. The information is provided online by the Geography and Maps Division of the U.S. Library of Congress, as part of the American Memory resource.
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Abraham Ortelius and the First Atlas

With an introduction by Leon Voet, and with 20 contributions by Günter Schilder, Rodney Shirley, Dennis Reinhartz, H.A.M. van der Heijden, Marijke Spies and others.

Author: M. P. R. van den Broecke

Publisher: Hes & De Graff Pub B V

ISBN: UOM:39015048750668

Category: History

Page: 430

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With an introduction by Leon Voet, and with 20 contributions by Günter Schilder, Rodney Shirley, Dennis Reinhartz, H.A.M. van der Heijden, Marijke Spies and others.
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Historical Atlases

Meurer, “Ortelius,” 147. 76. Vanden Broecke,Ortelius Atlas Maps, 253, no. 181 (Saint Paul); 254–55, nos. 182–83 (Abraham); 276, no. 222 (Alexander); 276, no ...

Author: Walter Goffart

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226300714

Category: History

Page: 603

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Today we can walk into any well-stocked bookstore or library and find an array of historical atlases. The first thorough review of the source material, Historical Atlases traces how these collections of "maps for history"—maps whose sole purpose was to illustrate some historical moment or scene—came into being. Beginning in the sixteenth century, and continuing down to the late nineteenth, Walter Goffart discusses milestones in the origins of historical atlases as well as individual maps illustrating historical events in alternating, paired chapters. He focuses on maps of the medieval period because the development of maps for history hinged particularly on portrayals of this segment of the postclassical, "modern" past. Goffart concludes the book with a detailed catalogue of more than 700 historical maps and atlases produced from 1570 to 1870. Historical Atlases will immediately take its place as the single most important reference on its subject. Historians of cartography, medievalists, and anyone seriously interested in the role of maps in portraying history will find it invaluable.
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Imagined Corners

Paul Binding has immersed himself in the Antwerp that produced Ortelius and his atlas, and he draws on a mass of letters, personal documents, maps, and pictures to bring it vividly to life.

Author: Paul Binding

Publisher: Headline Book Pub Limited

ISBN: 0747230404

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 107

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Published in Antwerp in 1570, the Theatrum orbis terrarum did something no previous book had done—it presented the world in all its component parts, offering the chance to see our planet as a place of staggering variety and ultimate unity. It was the world’s first atlas. Brainchild of Abraham Ortelius, the Theatrum reflected the enormous vitality of the era, the prevailing zest for exploration and discovery, and the linked activities of international commerce and mapmaking. Paul Binding has immersed himself in the Antwerp that produced Ortelius and his atlas, and he draws on a mass of letters, personal documents, maps, and pictures to bring it vividly to life. A masterly volume that stands as a tribute to the human need to impose order and reason on an all-too-turbulent world.
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The Map Thief

Unlike the maps in Ortelius's atlas, all of de Jode's maps were engraved by the same pair of brothers, giving the atlas a uniform beauty.

Author: Michael Blanding

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780698156982

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

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The story of an infamous crime, a revered map dealer with an unsavory secret, and the ruthless subculture that consumed him Maps have long exerted a special fascination on viewers—both as beautiful works of art and as practical tools to navigate the world. But to those who collect them, the map trade can be a cutthroat business, inhabited by quirky and sometimes disreputable characters in search of a finite number of extremely rare objects. Once considered a respectable antiquarian map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley spent years doubling as a map thief —until he was finally arrested slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. The Map Thief delves into the untold history of this fascinating high-stakes criminal and the inside story of the industry that consumed him. Acclaimed reporter Michael Blanding has interviewed all the key players in this stranger-than-fiction story, and shares the fascinating histories of maps that charted the New World, and how they went from being practical instruments to quirky heirlooms to highly coveted objects. Though pieces of the map theft story have been written before, Blanding is the first reporter to explore the story in full—and had the rare privilege of having access to Smiley himself after he’d gone silent in the wake of his crimes. Moreover, although Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, libraries claim he stole hundreds more—and offer intriguing clues to prove it. Now, through a series of exclusive interviews with Smiley and other key individuals, Blanding teases out an astonishing tale of destruction and redemption. The Map Thief interweaves Smiley’s escapades with the stories of the explorers and mapmakers he knew better than anyone. Tracking a series of thefts as brazen as the art heists in Provenance and a subculture as obsessive as the oenophiles in The Billionaire’s Vinegar, Blanding has pieced together an unforgettable story of high-stakes crime.
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The First Atlas

It is a collection of uniform map sheets and sustaining text bound to form a book for which copper printing plates were specifically engraved. 'The First Atlas' is an exploration of Ortelius's world by means of his maps.

Author: M. P. R. van den Broecke

Publisher:

ISBN: 184912017X

Category: Atlases, Dutch

Page: 256

View: 310

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The 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum', made by Abraham Ortelius, is considered to be the first modern atlas. It is a collection of uniform map sheets and sustaining text bound to form a book for which copper printing plates were specifically engraved. 'The First Atlas' is an exploration of Ortelius's world by means of his maps.
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Humanism and Christian Letters in Early Modern Iberia 1480 1630

vary from edition to edition, the basic format of the atlas remains the same. ... just in detail but by more and more new maps, to the extent that Ortelius ...

Author: Barry Taylor

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443822442

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

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Even though humanism derived its literary, moral and educational predilections from ancient Greek and Roman models, it was never an inherently secular movement and it soon turned to religious questions. Humanists were, of course, brought up with Christian beliefs, regarded the Bible as a fundamental text, and many of them were members of the clergy, either regular or secular. While their importance as religious sources was undiminished, biblical and patristic texts came also to be read for their literary value. Renaissance authors who aspired to be poetae christianissimi naturally looked to the Latin Fathers who reconciled classical and Christian views of life, and presented them in an elegant manner. The essays offered in this volume examine the influence of Christian Latin literature, whether biblical, patristic, scholastic or humanistic, upon the Latin and vernacular letters of the Iberian Peninsula in the period 1480 to 1630. The contributions have been organized into three thematically coherent groups, dealing with transmission, adaptation, and visual representation. Contrary to most studies on the Iberian literature of the period in which practically no essays are devoted to texts other than in Spanish, this volume successfully accommodates authors writing in Portuguese and Catalan. Likewise, a significant part of the pieces presented here is concerned with literary texts written in Latin. Moreover, it shows how the interests and preoccupations of the better-known authors of the Iberian Renaissance were also shared by contemporary figures whose choice of language may have resulted in their exclusion from the canon.
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Collections of Maps and Atlases in the Netherlands

When the first atlas was published in 1570 ( Ortelius's Theatrum orbis terrarum ) a new era in commercial cartography began and the popularity of the map ...

Author: Ir C. Koeman

Publisher: Brill Archive

ISBN:

Category: Map collections

Page: 301

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The Story of Maps

This was called Atlas Minor Gerardi Mercatoris ti I. Hondio. . . . The Mercator-Hondius atlases, major and minor, gradually superseded the Ortelius atlas ...

Author: Lloyd Arnold Brown

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486238739

Category: Travel

Page: 397

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"An important and scholarly work; bringing together much information available heretofore only in scattered sources. Easily readable." — Gerald I. Alexander, F.R.G.S. Cartographer, Map Division, New York Public Library. The first authoritative history of maps and the men who made them. The historical coverage of this volume is immense: from the first two centuries A.D. — Strabo and Ptolemy — through the end of the 19th century, with some discussion of 20th-century developments. 86 illustrations. Extensive notes and bibliography. "Mr. Brown felicitously marries scholarship to narrative and dramatic skill." — Henry Steele Commager.
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Motion in Maps Maps in Motion

The map is modelled exactly on Abraham Ortelius's map of the world before 1492, in his historical atlas volume called Parergon, first published in 1590.54 ...

Author: Zef Segal

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048542956

Category: History

Page: 206

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This volume argues that the mapping of stories, movement and change should not be understood as an innovation of contemporary cartography, but rather as an important aspect of human cartography with a longer history than might be assumed. The authors in this collection reflect upon the main characteristics and evolutions of story and motion mapping, from the figurative news and history maps that were mass-produced in early modern Europe, through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century flow maps that appeared in various atlases, up to the digital and interactive motion and personalised maps that are created today. Rather than presenting a clear and homogeneous history from the past up until the present, this book offers a toolbox for understanding and interpreting the complex interplays and links between narrative, motion and maps.
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Art and Cartography

The title cartouche on Ortelius's map of Asia ( fig . 5.1 ) , which appeared in the first edition of his atlas , comes from a Floris print of 1564 ( fig .

Author: David Woodward

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226907228

Category: Art

Page: 249

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The contributors—Svetlana Alpers, Samuel Y. Edgerton, Jr., Ulla Ehrensvard, Juergen Schulz, James A. Welu, and David Woodward—examine the historical links between art and cartography from varied perspectives.
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The Singapore and Melaka Straits

93 This map is found at the beginning of the discussion on Asia in Thevet, ... the maritime channel appears, see van den Broecke, Ortelius Atlas Maps, pp.

Author: Peter Borschberg

Publisher: NUS Press

ISBN: 9789971694647

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 416

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The Singapore and Melaka Straits are a place where regional and long-distance maritime trading networks converge, linking Europe, the Mediterranean, eastern Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and the Indian subcontinent with key centres of trade in Thailand, Indochina, insular Southeast Asia, China, Korea and Japan. The first half of the 17th century brought heightened political, commercial and diplomatic activity to this region. It had long been clear to both the Portuguese and the Dutch that whoever controlled the waters off modern Singapore gained a firm grip on regional as well as long-distance intra-Asian trade. By the early 1600s Portuguese power and prestige were waning and the arrival of the Dutch East India Company constituted a major threat. Moreover, the rapid expansion and growing power of the Acehnese Empire, and rivalry between Johor and Aceh, was creating a new context for European trade in Asia.
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Making Space Public in Early Modern Europe

So reads the biography of Ortelius in the English edition (1608) of the The- atrum, quoted in M.P.R. van den Broecke, Ortelius Atlas Maps: An Illus- trated ...

Author: Angela Vanhaelen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135104672

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 306

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Broadening the conversation begun in Making Publics in Early Modern Europe (2009), this book examines how the spatial dynamics of public making changed the shape of early modern society. The publics visited in this volume are voluntary groupings of diverse individuals that could coalesce through the performative uptake of shared cultural forms and practices. The contributors argue that such forms of association were social productions of space as well as collective identities. Chapters explore a range of cultural activities such as theatre performances; travel and migration; practices of persuasion; the embodied experiences of lived space; and the central importance of media and material things in the creation of publics and the production of spaces. They assess a multiplicity of publics that produced and occupied a multiplicity of social spaces where collective identity and voice could be created, discovered, asserted, and exercised. Cultural producers and consumers thus challenged dominant ideas about just who could enter the public arena, greatly expanding both the real and imaginary spaces of public life to include hitherto excluded groups of private people. The consequences of this historical reconfiguration of public space remain relevant, especially for contemporary efforts to meaningfully include the views of ordinary people in public life.
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