The Physics of Music and Color

This book aids readers in studying both subjects, which involve nearly the entire gamut of the fundamental laws of classical as well as modern physics.

Author: Leon Gunther

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461405572

Category: Science

Page: 540

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The Physics of Music and Color deals with two subjects, music and color - sound and light in the physically objective sense - in a single volume. The basic underlying physical principles of the two subjects overlap greatly: both music and color are manifestations of wave phenomena, and commonalities exist as to the production, transmission, and detection of sound and light. This book aids readers in studying both subjects, which involve nearly the entire gamut of the fundamental laws of classical as well as modern physics. Where traditional introductory physics and courses are styled so that the basic principles are introduced first and are then applied wherever possible, this book is based on a motivational approach: it introduces a subject by demonstrating a set of related phenomena, challenging readers by calling for a physical basis for what is observed. The Physics of Music and Color is written at level suitable for college students without any scientific background, requiring only simple algebra and a passing familiarity with trigonometry. It contains numerous problems at the end of each chapter that help the reader to fully grasp the subject.
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The Physics Of Music

I hope that this little book may serve as an introduction for some to the very interesting borderland between physics and music.

Author: Alexander Wood

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781446549100

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 462

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The Physics of Music by ALEXANDER WOOD.PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION: I HOPE that this little book may serve as an introduction for some to the very interesting borderland between physics and music. It is a borderland in which the co-operation of musicians and physicists may have important results for the future of music. The typescript and proofs have been read by Miss Nancy Browne from the point of view of the general reader, and many obscure passages have been clarified. On the technical side I am indebted to Dr Pringle, who has read the proofs and given me valuable criticism and advice. Miss Cawkewell has helped me with the illustrations, Mr Cottingham has supplied the photographs for Figs. 1.7 to i. io, and my secretary. Miss Sindall, has been responsible for the typing and for the assembly and preparation of the material. Because of the help received from these and others the book is a much better book than it would otherwise have been. For its remaining imperfections I must take full
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Music Physics and Engineering

Studies the methods, instruments, and processes involved in the creation, reception and duplication of sound

Author: Harry Ferdinand Olson

Publisher: New York : Dover Publications

ISBN: WISC:89033935610

Category: Music

Page: 460

View: 959

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Studies the methods, instruments, and processes involved in the creation, reception and duplication of sound
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The Physics of Musical Instruments

This book describes the results of such acoustical investigations - fascinating intellectual and practical exercises.

Author: Neville Fletcher

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1441931201

Category: Science

Page: 756

View: 645

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While the history of musical instruments is nearly as old as civilisation itself, the science of acoustics is quite recent. By understanding the physical basis of how instruments are used to make music, one hopes ultimately to be able to give physical criteria to distinguish a fine instrument from a mediocre one. At that point science may be able to come to the aid of art in improving the design and performance of musical instruments. As yet, many of the subtleties in musical sounds of which instrument makers and musicians are aware remain beyond the reach of modern acoustic measurements. This book describes the results of such acoustical investigations - fascinating intellectual and practical exercises. Addressed to readers with a reasonable grasp of physics who are not put off by a little mathematics, this book discusses most of the traditional instruments currently in use in Western music. A guide for all who have an interest in music and how it is produced, as well as serving as a comprehensive reference for those undertaking research in the field.
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Musical Sound

This text has been out of print since 1990; it was originally published by Solomon Press in 1987.

Author: Michael J. Moravcsik

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461505778

Category: Music

Page: 316

View: 220

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This text has been out of print since 1990; it was originally published by Solomon Press in 1987. Several experts in the field have verified that the information in the book remains constant; nothing has, or will, change in the basic science of musical sound. It explains the science of musical sound without the encumbrance of detailed mathematics. It will appeal to music lovers as well as students of music and students of physics. It can easily be promoted with our physics program.
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Physics and Music

Helmholtz, H. On the Sensations of Musical Tone. New York: Dover, 1954. Hutchins, C. M. “The Physics of Violins." Sci. Am. (Nov. 1962):78. . “Founding a Family ofFiddles." Phys. Today 20 (l967):25. Jeans, Sir J. Science and Music.

Author: Harvey E. White

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486794006

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 636

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Comprehensive and accessible, this foundational text surveys general principles of sound, musical scales, characteristics of instruments, mechanical and electronic recording devices, and many other topics. More than 300 illustrations plus questions, problems, and projects.
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Physics and Music

This book explores the fascinating and intimate relationship between music and physics.

Author: Kinko Tsuji

Publisher:

ISBN: 3030686779

Category: Music

Page: 424

View: 602

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This book explores the fascinating and intimate relationship between music and physics. Over millennia, the playing of, and listening to music have stimulated creativity and curiosity in people all around the globe. Beginning with the basics, the authors first address the tonal systems of European-type music, comparing them with those of other, distant cultures. They analyze the physical principles of common musical instruments with emphasis on sound creation and particularly charisma. Modern research on the psychology of musical perception the field known as psychoacoustics is also described. The sound of orchestras in concert halls is discussed, and its psychoacoustic effects are explained. Finally, the authors touch upon the role of music for our mind and society. Throughout the book, interesting stories and anecdotes give insights into the musical activities of physicists and their interaction with composers and musicians.
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Alexander Wood s The Physics of Music

This classic work deals in a nonmathematical way with the interface between physics and music.

Author: Alexander Wood

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: UOM:49015000730532

Category: Music

Page: 258

View: 200

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This classic work deals in a nonmathematical way with the interface between physics and music. There is a general introduction to wave motion and sound--its generation by vibration and the its reception by the ear and the brain. The sections that follow discuss consonance, dissonance, characteristic sounds of major instruments, the mechanical reproduction of music, and acoustics.
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Why You Hear What You Hear

Sound is key to our lives, and is the most accessible portal to the vibratory universe. This book takes you there.

Author: Eric J. Heller

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400845583

Category: Science

Page: 624

View: 941

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A groundbreaking textbook that explores the phenomena and physics of music and sound Why You Hear What You Hear is the first book on the physics of sound for the nonspecialist to empower readers with a hands-on, ears-open approach that includes production, analysis, and perception of sound. The book makes possible a deep intuitive understanding of many aspects of sound, as opposed to the usual approach of mere description. This goal is aided by hundreds of original illustrations and examples, many of which the reader can reproduce and adjust using the same tools used by the author (e.g., very accessible applets for PC and Mac, and interactive web-based examples, simulations, and analysis tools that can be found on the book's website: whyyouhearwhatyouhear.com). Readers are positioned to build intuition by participating in discovery. This truly progressive introduction to sound engages and informs amateur and professional musicians, performers, teachers, sound engineers, students of many stripes, and indeed anyone interested in the auditory world. The book does not hesitate to follow entertaining and sometimes controversial side trips into the history and world of acoustics, reinforcing key concepts. You will discover how musical instruments really work, how pitch is perceived, and how sound can be amplified with no external power source. Sound is key to our lives, and is the most accessible portal to the vibratory universe. This book takes you there. The first book on sound to offer interactive tools, building conceptual understanding via an experiential approach Supplementary website (http://www.whyyouhearwhatyouhear.com) provides Java, MAX, and other free, multiplatform, interactive graphical and sound applets Extensive selection of original exercises available on the web with solutions Nearly 400 full-color illustrations, many of simulations that students can do
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Introduction to the Physics and Psychophysics of Music

Actually, we shall try to weave a rather close mesh between physics and psychophysics—or, more precisely, psychoacoustics. After all, they appear naturally interwoven in music itself: not only pitch, loudness and timbre are a product of ...

Author: Juan G. Roederer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461599814

Category: Science

Page: 200

View: 209

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Viii book we shall refer a great deal to the discipline of psycho physics, which in a broad sense tries to establish in a quan titative form the causal relationship between the "physical" input from our senses and the psychological sensations and physiological reactions evoked in our mind and body, re spectively. Actually, we shall try to weave a rather close mesh between physics and psychophysics-or, more pre cisely, psychoacoustics. After all, they appear naturally interwoven in music itself: not only pitch, loudness and timbre are a product of physical and psychoacoustical proc esses, but so are the sensations related to consonance and dissonance, tonic dominance, trills and ornamentation, vibrato, phrasing, beats, tone attack, duration and decay, rhythm, and so on. Many books on physics of music or musical acoustics are readily available. An up-to-date text is the treatise of John Backus (1969). No book on psychoacoustics is available at the elementary level, though. Several review articles on pertinent topics can be found in Tobias (1970) and in Plomp and Smoorenburg (1970). A comprehensive discussion is given in Flanagan's book on speech (1972). And, of course, there is the classical treatise of von Bekesy (1960). A com prehensive up-to-date analysis of general brain processes can be found in Sommerhoff (1974); musical psychology is discussed in classical terms in Lundin (1967).
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Principles of Musical Acoustics

It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra.

Author: William M. Hartmann

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461467861

Category: Science

Page: 348

View: 794

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Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but computational techniques are included as these concepts are introduced, and there is further technical help in appendices.
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The Physics of Musical Instruments

Music, Acoustics and Architecture.” Wiley, New York. Beyer, R.T. (1974). “Nonlinear Acoustics. ... Evans, L.B., and Bass, H.E. (1986). Absorption and velocity of sound in still air. In “Handbook of Chemistry and Physics,” 67th ed., pp.

Author: Neville H. Fletcher

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461229803

Category: Science

Page: 620

View: 700

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The history of musical instruments is nearly as old as the history of civilization itself, and the aesthetic principles upon which judgments of musical quality are based are intimately connected with the whole culture within which the instruments have evolved. An educated modem Western player or listener can make critical judgments about particular instruments or particular per formances but, to be valid, those judgments must be made within the appro priate cultural context. The compass of our book is much less sweeping than the first paragraph might imply, and indeed our discussion is primarily confined to Western musical instruments in current use, but even here we must take account of centuries of tradition. A musical instrument is designed and built for the playing of music of a particular type and, conversely, music is written to be performed on particular instruments. There is no such thing as an "ideal" instrument, even in concept, and indeed the unbounded possibilities of modem digital sound-synthesis really require the composer or performer to define a whole set of instruments if the result is to have any musical coherence. Thus, for example, the sound and response of a violin are judged against a mental image of a perfect violin built up from experience of violins playing music written for them over the centuries. A new instrument may be richer in sound quality and superior in responsiveness, but if it does not fit that image then it is not a better violin.
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The Physics and Psychophysics of Music

begins to be influenced by external factors, some fortuitous and subjective, like the emotional state experienced by a person during the first listening of a given musical piece or passage therein; some more controllable, ...

Author: Juan G. Roederer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387094741

Category: Science

Page: 229

View: 137

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This book uses acoustics, psychophysics, and neurobiology to explore the physical systems and biological processes that intervene when we hear music. It incorporates the latest findings in brain science and tone generation in musical instruments.
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The Physics of Musical Instruments

Although the history of musical instruments is nearly as old as civilization itself, the science of acoustics is quite recent.

Author: Neville Horner Fletcher

Publisher:

ISBN: 0387983759

Category: Music

Page: 756

View: 593

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