Prayer in Josephus

In his account of Samson, Josephus followed in outline the story in Judges, which has a prayer corresponding to the one mentioned in the passage above, and he put the prayer in the same place in the story as in Judges.

Author: Tessel Marina Jonquière

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004158238

Category: Religion

Page: 336

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This book is an analysis of prayer in the works of Flavius Josephus, comprising a study of Josephus'own views and an analysis of 32 prayer texts within his narrative. New light is thus shed on his historiographic method and his theology.
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Flavius Josephus

All of this makes the prayer especially noteworthy: contrary to writing speeches (which are numerous in War), Josephus was not yet used to writing prayers when he wrote this work. He (probably) did not have a source which used prayers, ...

Author: Menahem Mor

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004191679

Category: Religion

Page: 452

View: 466

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Josephus, the Jewish historian who wrote about history, bible, and serves as a source for a wide-range of related disciplines is the subject of twenty four articles which grew out of an international colloquium.
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Prayer From Alexander To Constantine

The prayers Josephus incorporated into his works are confined almost exclusively to the first eight books of the Antiquities. These play a significant part in his purpose of presenting to his gentile readers the worthy and lofty ...

Author: Mark Kiley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317798910

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 195

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Prayer From Alexander To Constantine presents a diverse selection of prayer chosen by over 40 different historians, all specialists in their respective areas of Graeco-Roman literature. This collaboration gives the book a range and depth that no individual author could hope to rival. Each selection includes an introductory essay, followed by a new English translation of the prayer, accompanied by critical notes and biography. In this way the reader is able to gain an insight into the variety of subjects and styles involved in people's communications with their gods in antiquity. The volume will be a key text for students engaged in courses which explore the period's history and theologies. There is no comparable anthology available in English. The volume will also be of value to the general reader interested in the history of this period and anyone interested in the forms of prayer.
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Josephus Description of the Essenes Illustrated by the Dead Sea Scrolls

J.W. 2.8 , 5 $ 128–33 Before the rising of the sun they ... direct certain ancestral prayers towards it ( $ 128 ) . Josephus next speaks about the various activities in a typical day of the Essenes , especially the ritual worship of the ...

Author: Todd S. Beall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521609410

Category: Religion

Page: 216

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This study provides an analysis and commentary on Josephus' description of the Essenes in the light of the new material from Qumran. A fresh translation is provided alongside the Greek text of the passages in Josephus, as well as a full commentary on the major passages in which he describes this group.
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Prayers of Jewish Women

Only one includes women ( Ag . Ap . 1.209 ) : a passage in which Josephus mentions that all Jews come together at the Temple all day to pray , which becomes the explanation as to why Ptolemy was able to conquer Jerusalem .

Author: Markus H. McDowell

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161488504

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 157

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Markus McDowell examines how the literature of the Second Temple period portrays women at prayer through an examination of the literary context and character of those prayers. The goal of this work is a greater understanding of how women were portrayed in literary sources and an offering of some fresh insights for the study of women's religious and social roles in the ancient world. The texts are analyzed and categorized within five areas: social location, content, form, occasion, and gender perspective. The prayers are also compared and contrasted with men's prayers in the same sources. The analysis includes locating (as much as possible) the historical, literary, and cultic context of each document in which these prayers appear. By examining all prayers in these texts uttered by women (not just prayers of named or prominent women), and then comparing them with all the prayers of men in those same texts, certain patterns appear. This study adds to our knowledge of women and religion in Second Temple Judaism by primarily exploring patterns that appear among the prayers in the literature of the Second Temple period. While there are fewer prayers by women than men in this literature, the prayers of women are not portrayed as significantly different from those of men in terms of social location, content, form, or occasion. At the same time, the prayers of women exhibit other patterns of language - and in a minor way, form and occasion - that differ from the prayers of men.
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The Image of the Jew in Flavius Josephus Paraphrase of the Bible

Daniel is portrayed also as a man of prayer . Josephus amends the biblical account of his practice of kneeling three times a day before windows open towards Jerusalem ( Dan 6.10 ) to the statement that his custom was to stand and pray ...

Author: Paul Spilsbury

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161468694

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 382

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Josephus s Interpretation of the Bible

It is likewise indicative of Josephus's diminution of the divine element that he completely omits Samson's prayer to G - d ( Judg . 16:28 ) prior to his grandest achievement , bringing the temple down upon the thousands of Philistines .

Author: Louis H. Feldman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520918959

Category: History

Page: 934

View: 240

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Josephus (A.D. 37-?100), a pro-Roman Jew closely associated with the emperor Titus, is the earliest systematic commentator on the Bible, as well as one of the foremost historians of the beginning of the Christian era. Politically, Josephus was pro-Roman, and although he had no sympathy for extreme Jewish nationalism, he was a zealous defender of Jewish religion and culture. Louis H. Feldman examines the principles that guided Josephus in his understanding of the Bible, investigating his creative contribution in the rewriting of biblical accounts. This comprehensive study evaluates Josephus as a historian and demonstrates the originality and consistency of his work as an author. The first part of Feldman's work attempts to understand Josephus's purposes and techniques in retelling the Bible. The second part reviews Josephus's treatment of twelve key biblical figures. In addition to its reevaluation of an important early historian, this unique compendium provides a mine of information on the reassessment of the most important biblical figures.
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Shifting Images of the Hasmoneans

Also, in both stories those who turn to Onias rely on his proven ability for prayer. In Josephus: he “was asked to place a curse on Aristobulus and his fellow-rebels, just as he had, by his prayers, put an end to the rainless period” ...

Author: Vered Noam

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198811381

Category: Religion

Page: 277

View: 253

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The shifting image of the Hasmoneans in the eyes of their contemporaries and later generations is a compelling issue in the history of the Maccabean revolt and the Hasmonean commonwealth. Based on a series of six Jewish folktales from the Second Temple period that describe the Hasmonean dynasty and its history from its legendary founders, through achievement of full sovereignty, to downfall, this volume examines the Hasmoneans through the lens of reception history. On the one hand, these brief, colorful legends are embedded in the narrative of the historian of the age, Flavius Josephus; on the other hand, they are scattered throughout the extensive halakhic-exegetical compositions known as rabbinic literature, redacted and compiled centuries later. Each set of parallel stories is examined for the motivation underlying its creation, its original message, language, and the historical context. This analysis is followed by exploration of the nature of the relationship between the Josephan and the rabbinic versions, in an attempt to reconstruct the adaptation of the putative original traditions in the two corpora, and to decipher the disparities, different emphases, reworking, and unique orientations typical of each. These adaptations reflect the reception of the pristine tales and thus disclose the shifting images of the Hasmoneans in later generations and within distinct contexts. The compilation and characterization of these sources which were preserved by means of two such different conduits of transmission brings us closer to reconstruction of a lost literary continent, a hidden Jewish Atlantis of early pseudo-historical legends and facilitates examination of the relationship between the substantially different libraries and worlds of Josephus and rabbinic literature.
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Josephus and Modern Scholarship 1937 1980

In Izates' prayer Josephus employs direct speech exactly as in 11. 229–230, and Schalit consequently concludes that it is based on a Vorlage; he suggests that the whole prayer, moreover, has an Aramaic character.

Author: Louis H. Feldman

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110841589

Category: History

Page: 1070

View: 532

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Josephus Story of the Later Monarchy

Given the seeming exaggeration of this description , Josephus leaves it aside " . Having done so , 85. This compression of the Biblical Jonah's prayer is in line with Josephus ' treatment of other Scriptural prayers which he either ...

Author: Christopher Begg

Publisher: Peeters Publishers

ISBN: 9042907851

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 848

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Josephus recounts events of the period extending from the later reign of Jehoshaphat of Judah through the immediate sequels to the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in Antiquitates Judaicae (AJ) 9,1-10,185. Begg's monograph - a followup to his earlier work, Josephus Account of the Early Divided Monarchy (AJ 8,212-420) (BETL 108, 1993) - provides a detailed investigation of this portion of AJ. In particular, it seeks to address a range of overaching questions: which sources - both biblical and extra-biblical - did Josephus draw on in constructing his account of the later monarchy? Which text-form(s) of the Biblical sources were used by him? What sort of rewriting techniques has he applied to the data of his sources and what is distinctive about the Josephan version of events which results from their application? Finally, what messages may Josephus' account be intended to convey to his two intended audiences, i.e. cultivated Gentiles and fellow Jews? This study is envisaged as a contribution to a fuller appreciation of Josephus' work as an interpreter of the Bible.
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