Processing Metonymy and Metaphor

provides good answers to the expectations it title raisesthe book provides far more than just an approach for processing two tropes: the whole methods gives a way to distinguish diifferent tropes and literal language, to process meaning ...

Author: Dan Fass

Publisher: Praeger

ISBN: UOM:39015046913367

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 528

View: 944

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provides good answers to the expectations it title raisesthe book provides far more than just an approach for processing two tropes: the whole methods gives a way to distinguish diifferent tropes and literal language, to process meaning representations, and to resolve lexical ambiguity. --Computational Linguistics
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Metaphor and Metonymy in the Digital Age

artificial, to interpret it as a deliberate metaphor that maps a specific source space onto a specific target space. So an agent only sees metaphor potential where ... Processing metonymy and metaphor. Contemporary studies in cognitive ...

Author: Marianna Bolognesi

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027262295

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 263

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This book describes methods, risks, and challenges involved in the construction of metaphor and metonymy digital repositories. The first part of this volume showcases established and new projects around the world in which metaphors and metonymies are harvested and classified. The second part provides a series of cognitive linguistic studies focused on highlighting and discussing theoretical and methodological risks and challenges involved in building these digital resources. The volume is a result of an interdisciplinary collaboration between cognitive linguists, psychologists, and computational scientists supporting an overarching idea that metaphor and metonymy play a central role in human cognition, and that they are deeply entrenched in recurring patterns of bodily experience. Throughout the volume, a variety of methods are proposed to collect and analyze both conceptual metaphors and metonymies and their linguistic and visual expressions.
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Corpus Based Approaches to Metaphor and Metonymy

Fass, Dan C. 1997 Processing Metonymy and Metaphor. Greenwich CT: Ablex. Fillmore, Charles J. 1988 The mechanisms of Construction Grammar. Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, 35–55.

Author: Anatol Stefanowitsch

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110199895

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 325

View: 142

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The papers in this volume deal with the issue of how corpus data relate to the questions that cognitive linguists have typically investigated with respect to conceptual mappings. The authors in this volume investigate a wide range of issues - the coherence and function of particular metaphorical models, the interaction of form and meaning, the identification of source domains of metaphorical expressions, the relationship between metaphor and discourse, the priming of metaphors, and the historical development of metaphors. The studies deal with a variety of metaphorical and metonymic source and target domains, including the source domains SPACE, ANIMALS, BODY PARTS, ORGANIZATIONS and WAR, and the target domains VERBAL ACTIVITY, ECONOMY, EMOTIONS and POLITICS. In their studies, the authors present a variety of corpus-linguistic methods for the investigation of conceptual mappings, for example, corpora annotated for semantic categories, concordances of individual source-domain items and patterns, and concordances of target-domain items. In sum, the papers in this volume show how a wide range of corpus-linguistic methods can be used to investigate a variety of issues in cognitive linguistics; the combination of corpus methods with a cognitive-linguistic view of metaphor and metonymy yields new answers to old questions (and to new questions) about the relationship between language as a conceptual phenomenon and language as a textual phenomenon.
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Metonymy

A corpus linguistic perspective on the relationship between metonymy and metaphor. Style, 39 (1): 72–91. Deignan, A., and Armstrong, ... Metonymic processing: a cognitive ability relevant to translators, editors and language teachers.

Author: Jeannette Littlemore

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316240144

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

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'Metonymy' is a type of figurative language used in everyday conversation, a form of shorthand that allows us to use our shared knowledge to communicate with fewer words than we would otherwise need. 'I'll pencil you in' and 'let me give you a hand' are both examples of metonymic language. Metonymy serves a wide range of communicative functions, such as textual cohesion, humour, irony, euphemism and hyperbole - all of which play a key role in the development of language and discourse communities. Using authentic data throughout, this book shows how metonymy operates, not just in language, but also in gesture, sign language, art, music, film and advertising. It explores the role of metonymy in cross-cultural communication, along with the challenges it presents to language learners and translators. Ideal for researchers and students in linguistics and literature, as well as teachers and general readers interested in the art of communication.
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Metaphor and Writing

Processing Metonymy and Metaphor. Greenwich, Conn.: Ablex Publishing. Fauconnier, G. (2000). Methods and generalizations. In T. Janssen and G. Redeker (eds.), Cognitive Linguistics: Scope, Foundations, and Methodology, pp. 95–127.

Author: Philip Eubanks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139492065

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

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This volume explains how metaphors, metonymies, and other figures of thought interact cognitively and rhetorically to tell us what writing is and what it should do. Drawing on interviews with writing professionals and published commentary about writing, it argues that our everyday metaphors and metonymies for writing are part of a figurative rhetoric of writing - a pattern of discourse and thought that includes ways we categorize writers and writing; stories we tell about people who write; conceptual metaphors and metonymies used both to describe and to guide writing; and familiar, yet surprisingly adaptable, conceptual blends used routinely for imagining writing situations. The book will give scholars a fresh understanding of concepts such as 'voice', 'self', 'clarity', 'power', and the most basic figure of all: 'the writer'.
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The Metaphorical Brain

the underlying processes in metaphors and literal utterances, our findings can still be accounted for with his model. ... This leads to some initial conclusions about the (dis)similarity of metaphor and metonymy processing.

Author: Seana Coulson

Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

ISBN: 9782889197729

Category:

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Metaphor has been an issue of intense research and debate for decades (see, for example [1]). Researchers in various disciplines, including linguistics, psychology, computer science, education, and philosophy have developed a variety of theories, and much progress has been made [2]. For one, metaphor is no longer considered a rhetorical flourish that is found mainly in literary texts. Rather, linguists have shown that metaphor is a pervasive phenomenon in everyday language, a major force in the development of new word meanings, and the source of at least some grammatical function words [3]. Indeed, one of the most influential theories of metaphor involves the suggestion that the commonality of metaphoric language results because cross-domain mappings are a major determinant in the organization of semantic memory, as cognitive and neural resources for dealing with concrete domains are recruited for the conceptualization of more abstract ones [4]. Researchers in cognitive neuroscience have explored whether particular kinds of brain damage are associated with metaphor production and comprehension deficits, and whether similar brain regions are recruited when healthy adults understand the literal and metaphorical meanings of the same words (see [5] for a review) . Whereas early research on this topic focused on the issue of the role of hemispheric asymmetry in the comprehension and production of metaphors [6], in recent years cognitive neuroscientists have argued that metaphor is not a monolithic category, and that metaphor processing varies as a function of numerous factors, including the novelty or conventionality of a particular metaphoric expression, its part of speech, and the extent of contextual support for the metaphoric meaning (see, e.g., [7], [8], [9]). Moreover, recent developments in cognitive neuroscience point to a sensorimotor basis for many concrete concepts, and raise the issue of whether these mechanisms are ever recruited to process more abstract domains [10]. This Frontiers Research Topic brings together contributions from researchers in cognitive neuroscience whose work involves the study of metaphor in language and thought in order to promote the development of the neuroscientific investigation of metaphor. Adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, it synthesizes current findings on the cognitive neuroscience of metaphor, provides a forum for voicing novel perspectives, and promotes avenues for new research on the metaphorical brain. [1] Arbib, M. A. (1989). The metaphorical brain 2: Neural networks and beyond. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. [2] Gibbs Jr, R. W. (Ed.). (2008). The Cambridge handbook of metaphor and thought. Cambridge University Press. [3] Sweetser, Eve E. "Grammaticalization and semantic bleaching." Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society. Vol. 14. 2011. [4] Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1999). Philosophy in the flesh: The embodied mind and its challenge to western thought. Basic books. [5] Coulson, S. (2008). Metaphor comprehension and the brain. The Cambridge handbook of metaphor and thought, 177-194. [6] Winner, E., & Gardner, H. (1977). The comprehension of metaphor in brain-damaged patients. Brain, 100(4), 717-729. [7] Coulson, S., & Van Petten, C. (2007). A special role for the right hemisphere in metaphor comprehension?: ERP evidence from hemifield presentation. Brain Research, 1146, 128-145. [8] Lai, V. T., Curran, T., & Menn, L. (2009). Comprehending conventional and novel metaphors: An ERP study. Brain Research, 1284, 145-155. [9] Schmidt, G. L., Kranjec, A., Cardillo, E. R., & Chatterjee, A. (2010). Beyond laterality: a critical assessment of research on the neural basis of metaphor. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 16(01), 1-5. [10] Desai, R. H., Binder, J. R., Conant, L. L., Mano, Q. R., & Seidenberg, M. S. (2011). The neural career of sensory-motor metaphors. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23(9), 2376-2386.
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Metonymy and Language

A New Theory of Linguistic Processing Charles Denroche. secretive), tongue in cheek (not in earnest), etc, and has coined the term 'metaphor from metonymy' to describe them (Goossens 1990). Here, the physical reality of having 'lips ...

Author: Charles Denroche

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317608967

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 202

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Metonymy and Language presents a new theory of language and communication in which the central focus is on the concept of metonymy, the recognition of partial matches and overlaps. Through the use of original data sets and rigorous primary research, Denroche characterizes metonymy as key to understanding why language is so ‘fit for purpose’ and how it achieves such great subtlety and flexibility. This study develops the notion of ‘metonymic competence’ and demonstrates that metonymic behavior is often pursued for its own sake in recreational activities, such as quizzes, puzzles and play, and shows the possible impact of the application of metonymic processing theory to professional fields, such as language teaching and translator training. Furthermore, it proposes a research approach with metonymy at its center, ‘metonymics,’ which Denroche suggests could provide a powerful framework for addressing issues in numerous fields of practice in the arts and sciences.
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Defining Metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics

Referential metonymy across languages: What can cognitive linguistics and contrastive linguistics learn from each other? ... The role of domains in the interpretation of metaphors and metonymies. ... Processing Metonymy and Metaphor.

Author: Antonio Barcelona

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027223821

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 284

View: 323

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While cognitive linguists are essentially in agreement on both the conceptual nature and the fundamental importance of metonymy, there remain disagreements on a number of specific but, nevertheless, crucial issues. Research questions include: Is metonymy a relationship between entities or domains ? Is it necessarily referential? What is meant by the claim that metonymy is a stand-for relationship? Can metonymy be considered a mapping? How can it be distinguished from active zones or facets ? Is it a prototype category? The ten contributions of the present volume address such core issues on the basis of the latest research results. The volume is unique in being devoted exclusively to the delimitation of the notion of metonymy without ignoring points of divergence among the various contributors, thus paving the way towards a consensual conception of metonymy."
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Metonymy and Metaphor in Grammar

Metonymic bridges in modal shifts. In K.-U. Panther & G. Radden, eds., Metonymy in Language and Thought [Human Cognitive Processing 4], 193-210. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: Benjamins. Heine, Bernd. 1995. Agent-oriented vs. epistemic ...

Author: Klaus-Uwe Panther

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027223791

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 423

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with the advent of Cognitive Linguistics, metonymy and metaphor are now recognized as being not only ornamental rhetorical tropes but fundamental figures of thought that shape, to a considerable extent, the conceptual structure of languages. The present volume goes even beyond this insight to propose that grammar itself is metonymical in nature (Langacker) and that conceptual metonymy and metaphor leave their imprints on lexicogrammatical structure.
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Figurative Thought and Language in Action

In R. Benczes, A. Barcelona, & F. Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez (Eds.), Defining metonymy in cognitive linguistics: Towards a ... The role of domains in the interpretation of metaphors and metonymies. ... Processing Metonymy and Metaphor.

Author: Mario Brdar

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027257611

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 295

View: 382

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The contents of the volume prove the vitality of cognitive linguistic studies of figuration when combined with new research methodologies, in tandem with other disciplines, and also when applied to an ever broader range of topics. Individual chapters are concerned not only with some fundamental issues of defining and delimiting metaphor and metonymy, with the impact of figuration on grammatical forms, but are also exemplary discussions of how figurative language is processed and understood, as well as studies of practical ramifications of the use of figurative language in various types of discourse (the language of media, politics and healthcare communication). Most of the volume assumes a synchronic perspective, but diachronic coverage of processes is not missing either. In short, the volume demonstrates how rewarding it is to return to the true origins of cognitive linguistics for new inspiration and take a fresh start promising a true cornucopia of future results.
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