Quakers Jews and Science

Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.

Author: G. N. Cantor

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199276684

Category: Religion

Page: 420

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How do science and religion interact? This study examines the ways in which two minorities in Britain - the Quaker and Anglo-Jewish communities - engaged with science. Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.
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Quakers Jews and Science

Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.

Author: G. N. Cantor

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191603384

Category: Judaism

Page: 432

View: 587

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How do science and religion interact? This study examines the ways in which two minorities in Britain - the Quaker and Anglo-Jewish communities - engaged with science. Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.
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Quakers Jews and Science

Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.

Author: G. N. Cantor

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1131961491

Category: Judaism

Page:

View: 158

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How do science and religion interact? This study examines the ways in which two minorities in Britain - the Quaker and Anglo-Jewish communities - engaged with science. Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science.
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Science and Religion

Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650 – 1900. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cantor, Geoffrey N., and Marc Swetlitz, eds. Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of Darwinism.

Author: Gary B. Ferngren

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421421728

Category: Medical

Page: 484

View: 124

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Weissenbacher, Stephen P. Weldon, and Tomoko Yoshida
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The Oxford Handbook of Quaker Studies

Secondly, there has been recent and widespread recognition that science is not pursued in a social vacuum but ... Cantor, G. (2005) Quakers, Jews, and science: Religious responses to modernity and the sciences in Britain, 1650–1900.

Author: Stephen W. Angell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191667374

Category: Religion

Page: 672

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Quakerism began in England in the 1650s. George Fox, credited as leading the movement, had an experience of 1647 in which he felt he could hear Christ directly and inwardly without the mediation of text or minister. Convinced of the authenticity of this experience and its universal application, Fox preached a spirituality in which potentially all were ministers, all part of a priesthood of believers, a church levelled before the leadership of God. Quakers are a fascinating religious group both in their original 'peculiarity' and in the variety of reinterpretations of the faith since. The way they have interacted with wider society is a basic but often unknown part of British and American history. This handbook charts their history and the history of their expression as a religious community. This volume provides an indispensable reference work for the study of Quakerism. It is global in its perspectives and interdisciplinary in its approach whilst offering the reader a clear narrative through the academic debates. In addition to an in-depth survey of historical readings of Quakerism, the handbook provides a treatment of the group's key theological premises and its links with wider Christian thinking. Quakerism's distinctive ecclesiastical forms and practices are analysed, and its social, economic, political, and ethical outcomes examined. Each of the 37 chapters considers broader religious, social, and cultural contexts and provides suggestions for further reading and the volume concludes with an extensive bibliography to aid further research.
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Quakerism in the Atlantic World 1690 1830

Gary K. Waite, Jews and Muslims in Seventeenth-Century Discourse: From Religious Enemies to Allies and Friends (New York: Routledge, 2019), 7. 3. Geoffrey Cantor, Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the ...

Author: Robynne Rogers Healey

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271089652

Category: Religion

Page: 288

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This third installment in the New History of Quakerism series is a comprehensive assessment of transatlantic Quakerism across the long eighteenth century, a period during which Quakers became increasingly sectarian even as they expanded their engagement with politics, trade, industry, and science. The contributors to this volume interrogate and deconstruct this paradox, complicating traditional interpretations of what has been termed “Quietist Quakerism.” Examining the period following the Toleration Act in England of 1689 through the Hicksite-Orthodox Separation in North America, this work situates Quakers in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world. Three thematic sections—exploring unique Quaker testimonies and practices; tensions between Quakerism in community and Quakerism in the world; and expressions of Quakerism around the Atlantic world—broaden geographic understandings of the Quaker Atlantic experience to determine how local events shaped expressions of Quakerism. The authors challenge oversimplified interpretations of Quaker practices and reveal a complex Quaker world, one in which prescription and practice were more often negotiated than dictated, even after the mid-eighteenth-century “reformation” and tightening of the Discipline on both sides of the Atlantic. Accessible and well-researched, Quakerism in the Atlantic World, 1690-1830, provides fresh insights and raises new questions about an understudied period of Quaker history. In addition to the editor, the contributors to this volume include Richard C. Allen, Erin Bell, Erica Canela, Elizabeth Cazden, Andrew Fincham, Sydney Harker, Rosalind Johnson, Emma Lapsansky-Werner, Jon Mitchell, and Geoffrey Plank.
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Protecting the Empire s Humanity

Assuming nothing to be 'manifestly true', the pursuit of 'Truth' underpinned Friends' approach to religion, science, and indeed all spheres of life. Within science, Quakers favoured disciplines such as botany and astronomy, ...

Author: Zoë Laidlaw

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108169257

Category: History

Page:

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Rooted in the extraordinary archive of Quaker physician and humanitarian activist, Dr Thomas Hodgkin, this book explores the efforts of the Aborigines' Protection Society to expose Britain's hypocrisy and imperial crimes in the mid-nineteenth century. Hodgkin's correspondents stretched from Liberia to Lesotho, New Zealand to Texas, Jamaica to Ontario, and Bombay to South Australia; they included scientists, philanthropists, missionaries, systematic colonizers, politicians and indigenous peoples themselves. Debating the best way to protect and advance indigenous rights in an era of burgeoning settler colonialism, they looked back to the lessons and limitations of anti-slavery, lamented the imperial government's disavowal of responsibility for settler colonies, and laid out elaborate (and patronizing) plans for indigenous 'civilization'. Protecting the Empire's Humanity reminds us of the complexity, contradictions and capacious nature of British colonialism and metropolitan 'humanitarianism', illuminating the broad canvas of empire through a distinctive set of British and Indigenous campaigners.
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Science and Religion

27 Geoffrey Cantor, 'Friendsof science? The roleof sciencein Quaker periodicals', inHensonet al. (eds.), Culture and science, pp. 83–93.Seealso Cantor, Quakers, Jews,and science: Religiousresponses tomodernity andthe sciencesin Britain, ...

Author: Thomas Dixon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139486590

Category: Religion

Page:

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The idea of an inevitable conflict between science and religion was decisively challenged by John Hedley Brooke in his classic Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives (Cambridge, 1991). Almost two decades on, Science and Religion: New Historical Perspectives revisits this argument and asks how historians can now impose order on the complex and contingent histories of religious engagements with science. Bringing together leading scholars, this volume explores the history and changing meanings of the categories 'science' and 'religion'; the role of publishing and education in forging and spreading ideas; the connection between knowledge, power and intellectual imperialism; and the reasons for the confrontation between evolution and creationism among American Christians and in the Islamic world. A major contribution to the historiography of science and religion, this book makes the most recent scholarship on this much misunderstood debate widely accessible.
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Quaker Epistemology

Anne Conway, Early Quaker Thought, and the New Science. Quaker History, 96 (1), 24–35. doi:10.1353/qkh.2007.0011. Retrieved from https://muse.jhu .edu/article/393181/summary (accessed Mar 11, 2019). Cantor, G. N. (2005). Quakers, Jews ...

Author: Laura Rediehs

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004419018

Category: Religion

Page: 100

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Quaker Epistemology analyzes a distinctive ‘Inward Light’ theory of knowledge. This expanded experiential empiricism integrates spiritual and religious knowledge with an ethically grounded vision of scientific knowledge.
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Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of Darwinism

Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650-1900. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Carmell, Aryeh, and Cyril Domb, eds. Challenge: Torah Views on Science and Its Problems.

Author: G. N. Cantor

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226092768

Category: Religion

Page: 260

View: 534

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Darwin’s theory of evolution transformed the life sciences and made profound claims about human origins and the human condition, topics often viewed as the prerogative of religion. As a result, evolution has provoked a wide variety of religious responses, ranging from angry rejection to enthusiastic acceptance. While Christian responses to evolution have been studied extensively, little scholarly attention has been paid to Jewish reactions. Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of Darwinism is the first extended meditation on the Jewish engagement with this crucial and controversial theory. The contributors to Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of Darwinism—from several academic disciplines and two branches of the rabbinate—present case studies showing how Jewish discussions of evolution have been shaped by the intersections of faith, science, philosophy, and ideology in specific historical contexts. Furthermore, they examine how evolutionary theory has been deployed when characterizing Jews as a race, both by Zionists and by anti-Semites. Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of Darwinism addresses historical and contemporary, as well as progressive and Orthodox, responses to evolution in America, Europe, and Israel, ultimately extending the history of Darwinism into new religious domains.
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Science and Religion A Very Short Introduction

Islam and Islamic science Karen Armstrong, Islam: A Short History (London, 2001). ... Judaism and science Geoffrey Cantor, Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650–1900 (Oxford and ...

Author: Thomas Dixon

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191578984

Category: Religion

Page: 168

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The debate between science and religion is never out of the news: emotions run high, fuelled by polemical bestsellers like The God Delusion and, at the other end of the spectrum, high-profile campaigns to teach 'Intelligent Design' in schools. Yet there is much more to the debate than the clash of these extremes. As Thomas Dixon shows in this balanced and thought-provoking introduction, many have seen harmony rather than conflict between faith and science. He explores not only the key philosophical questions that underlie the debate, but also the social, political, and ethical contexts that have made 'science and religion' such a fraught and interesting topic in the modern world, offering perspectives from non-Christian religions and examples from across the physical, biological, and social sciences.. Along the way, he examines landmark historical episodes such as the trial of Galileo by the Inquisition in 1633, and the famous debate between 'Darwin's bulldog' Thomas Huxley and Bishop Wilberforce in Oxford in 1860. The Scopes 'Monkey Trial' in Tennessee in 1925 and the Dover Area School Board case of 2005 are explained with reference to the interaction between religion, law, and education in modern America. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
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Historical Dictionary of Judaism

Cantor, Geoffrey C., Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences, 1650–1900. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cantor, Geoffrey C., and Mark Swetlitz (eds.), Jewish Tradition and the Challenge of ...

Author: Norman Solomon

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442241428

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 140

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This third edition of Historical Dictionary of Judaism covers the history of the Jewish religion through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 800 cross-referenced entries on important personalities in Jewish religious history.
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Epistemic Virtues in the Sciences and the Humanities

Perhaps this is an argument for a kind of epistemic pluralism: science can thrive in many different cultures. ... Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650–1900.

Author: Jeroen van Dongen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319488936

Category: Science

Page: 198

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This book explores how physicists, astronomers, chemists, and historians in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries employed ‘epistemic virtues’ such as accuracy, objectivity, and intellectual courage. In doing so, it takes the first step in providing an integrated history of the sciences and humanities. It assists in addressing such questions as: What kind of perspective would enable us to compare organic chemists in their labs with paleographers in the Vatican Archives, or anthropologists on a field trip with mathematicians poring over their formulas? While the concept of epistemic virtues has previously been discussed, primarily in the contexts of the history and philosophy of science, this volume is the first to enlist the concept in bridging the gap between the histories of the sciences and the humanities. Chapters research whether epistemic virtues can serve as a tool to transcend the institutional disciplinary boundaries and thus help to attain a ‘post-disciplinary’ historiography of modern knowledge. Readers will gain a contextualization of epistemic virtues in time and space as the book shows that scholars themselves often spoke in terms of virtue and vice about their tasks and accomplishments. This collection of essays opens up new perspectives on questions, discourses, and practices shared across the disciplines, even at a time when the neo-Kantian distinction between sciences and humanities enjoyed its greatest authority. Scholars including historians of science and of the humanities, intellectual historians, virtue epistemologists, and philosophers of science will all find this book of particular interest and value.
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Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain

The primary leaders within the APS were the Quaker abolitionists Thomas Hodgkin (1798–1866) and Thomas Buxton (1786–1845). ... 244–57; G. Cantor, Quakers, Jews and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain ...

Author: Mark Bevir

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107166684

Category: History

Page: 273

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Historicism and the Human Sciences in Victorian Britain explores the rise and nature of historicist thinking about such varied topics as life, race, character, literature, language, economics, empire, and law. The contributors show that the Victorians typically understood life and society as developing historically in a way that made history central to their intellectual inquiries and their public culture. Although their historicist ideas drew on some Enlightenment themes, they drew at least as much on organic ideas and metaphors in ways that lent them a developmental character. This developmental historicism flourished alongside evolutionary motifs and romantic ideas of the self. The human sciences were approached through narratives, and often narratives of reason and progress. Life, individuals, society, government, and literature all unfolded gradually in accord with underlying principles, such as those of rationality, nationhood, and liberty. This book will appeal to those interested in Victorian Britain, historiography, and intellectual history.
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Science and Christianity in Pulpit and Pew

On Jews and Darwinism, see Marc Swetlitz, ''American Jewish Responses to Darwin and Evolutionary Theory, 1860–1890,'' in Numbers and Stenhouse, Disseminating Darwinism, 209–246; Geoffrey Cantor, Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious ...

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195320374

Category: Religion

Page: 198

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These essays address broad topics such as the popularization of scientific ideas, secularization and the development of the naturalistic worldview.
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The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science

The Wrst major analysis of Jewish responses to the theory of evolution has now been published (Cantor and Swetlitz 2006), ... Quakers, Jews, and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650–1900.

Author: Philip Clayton

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199279276

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1023

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The field of `science and religion' is exploding in popularity among both academics and the reading public. This is a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the debate, written by the leading experts yet accessible to the general reader.
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God in the Landscape

Prominent Quaker botanists included among many others Peter Collinson (1694–1768, London), brothers James and Thomas ... 289, 304; Geoffrey Cantor, Quakers, Jews and Science: Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, ...

Author: Kerrie Handasyde

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350181502

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 889

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This book shows how creative writing gives voice to the drama and nuance of religious experience in a way that is rarely captured by sermons, reports, and the minutes of church meetings. The author explores the history of religious Dissent and Evangelicalism in Australia through a variety of literary responses to landscape, from both men and women, lay and ordained. The book explores transnational themes, along with themes of migration and travel across the Australian continent. The author gives insight into the literature of Protestant Dissent, concerned as it is with travel, belonging, and the intersection of national and religious identity. Much of the writing is situated on the road: a soldier returning from the Great War, a child on a lone adventure, a night-time journey through urban slums; all of these are in some way dependent on the theme of “walking with Jesus” as the Holy Land travelogues make explicit. God in the Landscape draws the links between landscape, literature, and spirituality with imagination and insight and is an important contribution to the historical study of religion and the environment.
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The Poetry of Victorian Scientists

Style, Science and Nonsense Daniel Brown. 58. 5960. 61. ... 5\o<><>\1_o\v\4=-\,-g-< H H Parshall, Sylvester: jewish Mathematician, 213. ... Sylvester, Mathematical Papers, 111, 81n.; Cantor, Quakers, jews, and Science, 85; cited 84-5.

Author: Daniel Brown

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139619967

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

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A surprising number of Victorian scientists wrote poetry. Many came to science as children through such games as the spinning-top, soap-bubbles and mathematical puzzles, and this playfulness carried through to both their professional work and writing of lyrical and satirical verse. This is the first study of an oddly neglected body of work that offers a unique record of the nature and cultures of Victorian science. Such figures as the physicist James Clerk Maxwell toy with ideas of nonsense, as through their poetry they strive to delineate the boundaries of the new professional science and discover the nature of scientific creativity. Also considering Edward Lear, Daniel Brown finds the Victorian renaissances in research science and nonsense literature to be curiously interrelated. Whereas science and literature studies have mostly focused upon canonical literary figures, this original and important book conversely explores the uses literature was put to by eminent Victorian scientists.
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The Age of Secrecy

All details on da Costa are taken from Cantor, Quakers, Jews, and Science, esp. 123 and 170–172. On this, see above, esp. Chapter 4. See also Israel, European Jewry, 144; Stern, Court Jew, esp. 41. Luzzatto, Discorso, ch. 5.

Author: Daniel Jütte (Jutte)

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300213423

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 918

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The fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries were truly an Age of Secrecy in Europe, when arcane knowledge was widely believed to be positive knowledge which extended into all areas of daily life. So asserts Daniel Jütte in this engrossing, vivid, and award-winning work. He maintains that the widespread acceptance and even reverence for this “economy of secrets” in premodern Europe created a highly complex and sometimes perilous space for mutual contact between Jews and Christians. Surveying the interactions between the two religious groups in a wide array of secret sciences and practices, the author relates true stories of colorful “professors of secrets” and clandestine encounters. In the process Jütte examines how our current notion of secrecy is radically different in this era of WikiLeaks, Snowden, etc., as opposed to centuries earlier when the truest, most important knowledge was generally considered to be secret by definition.
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Martin Folkes 1690 1754

Da Costa would in 1763 become the first Jewish clerk of the Royal Society , although he was not the first or only Jewish ... Geoffrey Cantor , Quakers , Jews , and Science : Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain ...

Author: Anna Marie Roos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192565655

Category: Science

Page: 592

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Martin Folkes (1690-1754): Newtonian, Antiquary, Connoisseur is a cultural and intellectual biography of the only President of both the Royal Society and the Society of Antiquaries. Sir Isaac Newton's protégé, astronomer, mathematician, freemason, art connoisseur, Voltaire's friend and Hogarth's patron, his was an intellectually vibrant world. Folkes was possibly the best-connected natural philosopher and antiquary of his age, an epitome of Enlightenment sociability, and yet he was a surprisingly neglected figure, the long shadow of Newton eclipsing his brilliant disciple. A complex figure, Folkes edited Newton's posthumous works in biblical chronology, yet was a religious skeptic and one of the first members of the gentry to marry an actress. His interests were multidisciplinary, from his authorship of the first complete history of the English coinage, to works concerning ancient architecture, statistical probability, and astronomy. Rich archival material, including Folkes's travel diary, correspondence, and his library and art collections permit reconstruction through Folkes's eyes of what it was like to be a collector and patron, a Masonic freethinker, and antiquarian and virtuoso in the days before 'science' became sub-specialised. Folkes's virtuosic sensibility and possible role in the unification of the Society of Antiquaries and the Royal Society tells against the historiographical assumption that this was the age in which the 'two cultures' of the humanities and sciences split apart, never to be reunited. In Georgian England, antiquarianism and 'science' were considered largely part of the same endeavour.
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