Revolt Against Chivalry

Revolt Against Chivalry, winner of the Frances B. Simkins and Lillian Smith Awards, is the classic account of how Jessie Daniel Ames - and the antilynching campaign she led - fused the causes of feminism and racial justice in the South ...

Author: Jacquelyn Dowd Hall

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231082835

Category: Social Science

Page: 405

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Revolt Against Chivalry, winner of the Frances B. Simkins and Lillian Smith Awards, is the classic account of how Jessie Daniel Ames - and the antilynching campaign she led - fused the causes of feminism and racial justice in the South during the 1920s and 1930s.
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Sisters and Rebels A Struggle for the Soul of America

Winner of the 2020 PEN America/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography, the 2020 Summersell Prize, a 2020 PROSE Award, and a Plutarch Award finalist “The word befitting this work is ‘masterpiece.’ ” —Paula J. Giddings, author ...

Author: Jacquelyn Dowd Hall

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393355734

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 672

View: 936

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Three sisters from the South wrestle with orthodoxies of race, sexuality, and privilege. Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in the North, Grace and Katharine reinvented themselves as radical thinkers whose literary works and organizing efforts brought the nation’s attention to issues of region, race, and labor. In Sisters and Rebels, National Humanities Award–winning historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall follows the divergent paths of the Lumpkin sisters, who were “estranged and yet forever entangled” by their mutual obsession with the South. Tracing the wounds and unsung victories of the past through to the contemporary moment, Hall revives a buried tradition of Southern expatriation and progressivism; explores the lost, revolutionary zeal of the early twentieth century; and muses on the fraught ties of sisterhood. Grounded in decades of research, the family’s private papers, and interviews with Katharine and Grace, Sisters and Rebels unfolds an epic narrative of American history through the lives and works of three Southern women.
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Southern Women

Interviews in this series focus on women's participation in movements for social change.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1181791807

Category: Electronic books

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Interviews in this series focus on women's participation in movements for social change. The idea for a series of interviews with southern women originated with Jacquelyn Hall's study, Revolt Against Chivalry (Columbia University Press, 1979), which looks at the role of women in the anti-lynching movement of the Depression decade. Other interviews, financed by a 1974 Rockefeller Foundation grant to the Southern Oral History Program, expanded this focus to include labor relations, race relations, and reform movements.
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The Cambridge Companion to American Methodism

Willard, Woman in the Pulpit (Washington, DC: Zenger Publishing Co., 1978), 56Iacquelyn Dowd Hall, Revolt against Chivalry: Iessie Daniel Ames and the ...

Author: Jason E. Vickers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107008342

Category: Religion

Page: 392

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A comprehensive introduction to various forms of American Methodism, exploring the beliefs and practices around which the lives of these churches have revolved.
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Race Rape and Lynching

See also Hall's book-length study, Revolt Against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching (New York: Columbia Univ.

Author: Sandra Gunning

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195356659

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

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In the late nineteenth century, the stereotype of the black male as sexual beast functioned for white supremacists as an externalized symbol of social chaos against which all whites would unite for the purpose of national renewal. The emergence of this stereotype in American culture and literature during and after Reconstruction was related to the growth of white-on-black violence, as white lynch mobs acted in "defense" of white womanhood, the white family, and white nationalism. In Writing a Red Record Sandra Gunning investigates American literary encounters with the conditions, processes, and consequences of such violence through the representation of not just the black rapist stereotype, but of other crucial stereotypes in mediating moments of white social crisis: "lascivious" black womanhood; avenging white masculinity; and passive white femininity. Gunning argues that these figures together signify the tangle of race and gender representation emerging from turn-of-the-century American literature. The book brings together Charles W. Chestnutt, Kate Chopin, Thomas Dixon, David Bryant Fulton, Pauline Hopkins, Mark Twain, and Ida B. Wells: famous, infamous, or long-neglected figures who produced novels, essays, stories, and pamphlets in the volatile period of the 1890s through the early 1900s, and who contributed to the continual renegotiation and redefinition of the terms and boundaries of a national dialogue on racial violence.
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Behind the Mask of Chivalry

Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, quote on 149, discussion on 149–53. For another attempt to make sense of the role of gender in lynching, this one more ...

Author: Nancy K. MacLean

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198023654

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 361

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On Thanksgiving night, 1915, a small band of hooded men gathered atop Stone Mountain, an imposing granite butte just outside Atlanta. With a flag fluttering in the wind beside them, a Bible open to the twelfth chapter of Romans, and a flaming cross to light the night sky above, William Joseph Simmons and his disciples proclaimed themselves the new Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, named for the infamous secret order in which many of their fathers had served after the Civil War. Unsure of their footing in the New South and longing for the provincial, patriarchal world of the past, the men of the second Klan saw themselves as an army in training for a war between the races. They boasted that they had bonded into "an invisible phalanx...to stand as impregnable as a tower against every encroachment upon the white man's liberty...in the white man's country, under the white man's flag." Behind the Mask of Chivalry brings the "invisible phalanx" into broad daylight, culling from history the names, the life stories, and the driving passions of the anonymous Klansmen beneath the white hoods and robes. Using an unusual and rich cache of internal Klan records from Athens, Georgia, to anchor her observations, author Nancy MacLean combines a fine-grained portrait of a local Klan world with a penetrating analysis of the second Klan's ideas and politics nationwide. No other right-wing movement has ever achieved as much power as the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s, and this book shows how and why it did. MacLean reveals that the movement mobilized its millions of American followers largely through campaigns waged over issues that today would be called "family values": Prohibition violation, premarital sex, lewd movies, anxieties about women's changing roles, and worries over waning parental authority. Neither elites nor "poor white trash," most of the Klan rank and file were married, middle-aged, and middle class. Local meetings, or klonklaves, featured readings of the minutes, plans for recruitment campaigns and Klan barbecues, and distribution of educational materials--Christ and Other Klansmen was one popular tome. Nonetheless, as mundane as proceedings often were at the local level, crusades over "morals" always operated in the service of the Klan's larger agenda of virulent racial hatred and middle-class revanchism. The men who deplored sex among young people and sought to restore the power of husbands and fathers were also sworn to reclaim the "white man's country," striving to take the vote from blacks and bar immigrants. Comparing the Klan to the European fascist movements that grew out of the crucible of the first World War, MacLean maintains that the remarkable scope and frenzy of the movement reflected less on members' power within their communities than on the challenges to that power posed by African Americans, Jews, Catholics, immigrants, and white women and youth who did not obey the Klan's canon of appropriate conduct. In vigilante terror, the Klan's night riders acted out their movement's brutal determination to maintain inherited hierarchies of race, class, and gender. Compellingly readable and impeccably researched, The Mask of Chivalry is an unforgettable investigation of a crucial era in American history, and the social conditions, cultural currents, and ordinary men that built this archetypal American reactionary movement.
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White Fright

Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, 99. 10. Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, 99. 11. Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, 99. 12. Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, 100. 13.

Author: Jane Dailey

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781541646544

Category: History

Page: 368

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A major new history of the fight for racial equality in America, arguing that fear of black sexuality has undergirded white supremacy from the start. In White Fright, historian Jane Dailey brilliantly reframes our understanding of the long struggle for African American rights. Those fighting against equality were not motivated only by a sense of innate superiority, as is often supposed, but also by an intense fear of black sexuality. In this urgent investigation, Dailey examines how white anxiety about interracial sex and marriage found expression in some of the most contentious episodes of American history since Reconstruction: in battles over lynching, in the policing of black troops' behavior overseas during World War II, in the violent outbursts following the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education, and in the tragic story of Emmett Till. The question was finally settled -- as a legal matter -- with the Court's definitive 1967 decision in Loving v. Virginia, which declared interracial marriage a "fundamental freedom." Placing sex at the center of our civil rights history, White Fright offers a bold new take on one of the most confounding threads running through American history.
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Between Arab and White

Hall, Revolt against Chivalry, 64; Mitchell F. Ducey, The Commission on Interracial Cooperation Papers, 1919-1944 and the Association of Southern Women for ...

Author: Sarah Gualtieri

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520943465

Category: History

Page: 296

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This multifaceted study of Syrian immigration to the United States places Syrians— and Arabs more generally—at the center of discussions about race and racial formation from which they have long been marginalized. Between Arab and White focuses on the first wave of Arab immigration and settlement in the United States in the years before World War II, but also continues the story up to the present. It presents an original analysis of the ways in which people mainly from current day Lebanon and Syria—the largest group of Arabic-speaking immigrants before World War II—came to view themselves in racial terms and position themselves within racial hierarchies as part of a broader process of ethnic identity formation.
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Reforming Jim Crow

Quoted in Hall, Revolt against Chivalry, 226. 28. See McDonough, “Men and Women of Good Will,”81–82; Ellis, “Commission on Interracial Cooperation,” 66–69.

Author: Kimberley Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195387421

Category: History

Page: 326

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This text reshapes how we think about the origins of the civil rights era. The book paints a complex portrait of racial politics in the South in the first half of the 20th century and shows how the weaknesses in the Jim Crow system allowed reformers to lay some of the groundwork that would lead to the system's eventual collapse.
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Federal Law and Southern Order

Study , ” American Historical Review 76 ( December 1971 ) : 1439–41 ; Hall , Revolt Against Chivalry , p . 132 ; Zangrando , NAACP Crusade , pp .

Author: Michal R. Belknap

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820317357

Category: Social Science

Page: 387

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Federal Law and Southern Order, first published in 1987, examines the factors behind the federal government's long delay in responding to racial violence during the 1950s and 1960s. The book also reveals that it was apprehension of a militant minority of white racists that ultimately spurred acquiescent state and local officials in the South to protect blacks and others involved in civil rights activities. By tracing patterns of violent racial crimes and probing the federal government's persistent failure to punish those who committed the crimes, Michal R. Belknap tells how and why judges, presidents, members of Congress, and even Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation officials accepted the South's insistence that federalism precluded any national interference in southern law enforcement. Lulled into complacency by the soothing rationalization of federalism, Washington for too long remained a bystander while the Ku Klux Klan and others used violence to sabotage the civil rights movement, Belknap demonstrates. In the foreword to this paperback edition, Belknap examines how other scholars, in works published after Federal Law and Southern Order, have treated issues related to federal efforts to curb racial violence. He also explores how incidents of racial violence since the 1960s have been addressed by the state legal systems of the South and discusses the significance for the contemporary South of congressional legislation enacted during the 1960s to suppress racially motivated murders, beatings, and intimidation.
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Sisterhood Questioned

225–6, source of quotation; Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, p. 166. 85 Giddings, When and Where I Enter, p. 171; Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry, p. 167.

Author: Christine Bolt

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415158534

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

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This readable and informative survey, including both new research and synthesis, provides the first close comparison of race, class and internationalism in the British and American women's movements during this period. Sisterhood Questioned assesses the nature and impact of divisions in the twentieth century American and British women's movements. In this lucidly written study, Christine Bolt sheds new light on these differences, which flourished in an era of political reaction, economic insecurity, polarizing nationalism and resurgent anti-feminism. The author reveals how the conflicts were seized upon and publicised by contemporaries, and how the activists themselves were forced to confront the increasingly complex tensions. Drawing on a wide range of sources, the author demonstrates that women in the twentieth century continued to co-operate despite these divisions, and that feminist movements remained active right up to and beyond the reformist 1960s. It is invaluable reading for all those with an interest in American history, British history or women's studies.
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Lynching in the New South

Hall , Revolt against Chivalry , 173–74 , 178 , 183 , 186 , 195 , 188 , 204-5 ... see Hall , Revolt against Chivalry , chapter 8 ; and John Shelton Reed ...

Author: William Fitzhugh Brundage

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252063457

Category: History

Page: 375

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Based on analysis of nearly 600 cases, this volume offers a full appraisal of the complex character of lynching. An original aspect of this work demonstrates the role blacks played in combatting lynching, either by flight, protest, or organized opposition which culminated in the expansion of the NAACP.
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Legacies of Lynching

Hall , Revolt against Chivalry , 22 . 22. Zangrando , The NAACP Crusade , 102 . 23. The ASWPL was not the first women's antilynching organization ...

Author: Jonathan Markovitz

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816639949

Category: Social Science

Page: 227

View: 101

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Between 1880 and 1930, thousands of African Americans were lynched in the United States. Beyond the horrific violence inflicted on these individuals, lynching terrorized whole communities and became a defining characteristic of Southern race relations in the Jim Crow era. As spectacle, lynching was intended to serve as a symbol of white supremacy. Yet, Jonathan Markovitz notes, the act's symbolic power has endured long after the practice of lynching has largely faded away. Legacies of Lynching examines the evolution of lynching as a symbol of racial hatred and a metaphor for race relations in popular culture, art, literature, and political speech. Markovitz credits the efforts of the antilynching movement with helping to ensure that lynching would be understood not as a method of punishment for black rapists but as a terrorist practice that provided stark evidence of the brutality of Southern racism and as America's most vivid symbol of racial oppression. Cinematic representations of lynching, from Birth of a Nation to Do the Right Thing, he contends, further transform the ways that American audiences remember and understand lynching, as have disturbing recent cases in which alleged or actual acts of racial violence reconfigured stereotypes of black criminality. Markovitz further reveals how lynching imagery has been politicized in contemporary society with the example of Clarence Thomas, who condemned the Senate's investigation into allegations of sexual harassment during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings as a "high-tech lynching." Even today, as revealed by the 1998 dragging death of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and the national soul-searching it precipitated, lynchingcontinues to pervade America's collective memory. Markovitz concludes with an analysis of debates about a recent exhibition of photographs of lynchings, suggesting again how lynching as metaphor remains always in the background of our national discussions of race and racial relations. Jonathan Markovitz is a lecturer in sociology at the University of California, San Diego.
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Lugenia Burns Hope Black Southern Reformer

28 • Hall, Revolt against Chivalry, pp. 86-87. 29 • "Interracial Origin of Women's Group," CIC Folder, NUC. 30 • Ibid., Hall, Revolt against Chivalry, p.

Author: Jacqueline Anne Rouse

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820323861

Category: History

Page: 182

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From the turn of the century until her death in 1947, Lugenia Burns Hope worked to promote black equality--in Atlanta as the wife of John Hope, president of both Morehouse College and Atlanta University, and on a national level in her discussions with such influential leaders as W.E.B. Du Bois and Jessie Daniel Ames. Highlighting the life of the zealous reformer, Jacqueline Anne Rouse offers a portrait of a seemingly tireless woman who worked to build the future of her race.
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Civilizing Capitalism

On women's interracial organizing, see Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry. 74. The Atlanta School of Social Work evolved at the initiative of Lugenia Burns Hope, ...

Author: Landon R. Y. Storrs

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807860991

Category: Political Science

Page: 408

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Offering fresh insights into the history of labor policy, the New Deal, feminism, and southern politics, Landon Storrs examines the New Deal era of the National Consumers' League, one of the most influential reform organizations of the early twentieth century. Founded in 1899 by affluent women concerned about the exploitation of women wage earners, the National Consumers' League used a strategy of "ethical consumption" to spark a successful movement for state laws to reduce hours and establish minimum wages for women. During the Great Depression, it campaigned to raise labor standards in the unregulated, non-union South, hoping to discourage the relocation of manufacturers to the region because of cheaper labor and to break the downward spiral of labor standards nationwide. Promoting regulation of men's labor as well as women's, the league shaped the National Recovery Administration codes and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 but still battled the National Woman's Party, whose proposed equal rights amendment threatened sex-based labor laws. Using the National Consumers' League as a window on the nation's evolving reform tradition, Civilizing Capitalism explores what progressive feminists hoped for from the New Deal and why, despite significant victories, they ultimately were disappointed.
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Who Lives Who Dies Who Decides

44 Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, Revolt Against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching (New York: Columbia University Press, 1974), ...

Author: Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317612193

Category: Social Science

Page: 434

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This second edition of Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides? has been updated to consider the rising stakes for issues of life and death. Abortion, assisted dying, and capital punishment are among the most contentious issues in many societies and demand debate. Whose rights are protected? How do these rights and protections change over time and who makes those decisions? Based on the author’s award-winning and hugely popular undergraduate course at the University of Texas and highly recommended by Choice Magazine, this book explores the fundamentally sociological processes which underlie the quest for morality and justice in human societies. The Author’s goal is not to advocate any particular moral "high ground" but to shed light on the social movements and social processes which are at the root of these seemingly personal moral questions and to develop readers to develop their own opinions.
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History Ahead

Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, Revolt against Chivalry. Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign against Lynching (New York: Columbia University Press, 1979), p.

Author: Dan K. Utley

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781603441513

Category: History

Page: 336

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More than 13,000 historical markers line the roadsides of Texas, giving drivers a way to sample the stories of the past. But these markers tell only part of the story. In History Ahead, Dan K. Utley and Cynthia J. Beeman introduce readers to the rich, colorful, and sometimes action-packed and humorous history behind the famous (Charles Lindbergh, Will Rogers, The Big Bopper, and jazz great Charlie Christian) and the not-so-famous (Elmer "Lumpy" Kleb, Don Pedro Jaramillo, and Carl Morene, the "music man of Schulenburg") who have left their marks on the history of Texas. They visit cotton gins, abandoned airfields, forgotten cemeteries, and former World War II alien detention camps to dig up the little-known and unsuspected narratives behind the text emblazoned on these markers. Written in an anecdotal style that presents the cultural uniqueness and rich diversity of Texas history, History Ahead includes nineteen main stories, dozens of complementary sidebars, and many never-before-published historical and contemporary photographs. History Ahead offers a rich array of local stories that interweave with the broader regional and national context, touching on themes of culture, art, music, technology, the environment, oil, aviation, and folklore, among other topics. Utley and Beeman have located these forgotten gems, polished them up to a high shine, and offered them along with convenient maps and directions to the marker sites.
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The Terror Dream

183 – 84 , 188 ; Jacquelyn Dowd Hall , Revolt Against Chivalry : Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women ' s Campaign Against Lynching ( New York : Columbia ...

Author: Susan Faludi

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1429922125

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

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From the Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author of Backlash—an unflinching dissection of the mind of America after 9/11 In this most original examination of America's post-9/11 culture, Susan Faludi shines a light on the country's psychological response to the attacks on that terrible day. Turning her acute observational powers on the media, popular culture, and political life, Faludi unearths a barely acknowledged but bedrock societal drama shot through with baffling contradictions. Why, she asks, did our culture respond to an assault against American global dominance with a frenzied summons to restore "traditional" manhood, marriage, and maternity? Why did we react as if the hijackers had targeted not a commercial and military edifice but the family home and nursery? Why did an attack fueled by hatred of Western emancipation lead us to a regressive fixation on Doris Day womanhood and John Wayne masculinity, with trembling "security moms," swaggering presidential gunslingers, and the "rescue" of a female soldier cast as a "helpless little girl"? The answer, Faludi finds, lies in a historical anomaly unique to the American experience: the nation that in recent memory has been least vulnerable to domestic attack was forged in traumatizing assaults by nonwhite "barbarians" on town and village. That humiliation lies concealed under a myth of cowboy bluster and feminine frailty, which is reanimated whenever threat and shame looms. Brilliant and important, The Terror Dream shows what 9/11 revealed about us—and offers the opportunity to look at ourselves anew.
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Veiled Visions

Sosna, In Search of the Silent South, 25–26; Chappell, Inside Agitators, 36–37; Hall, Revolt against Chivalry, 237–41. Janken, White, 366–72.

Author: David Fort Godshalk

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807876848

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

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In 1906 Atlanta, after a summer of inflammatory headlines and accusations of black-on-white sexual assaults, armed white mobs attacked African Americans, resulting in at least twenty-five black fatalities. Atlanta's black residents fought back and repeatedly defended their neighborhoods from white raids. Placing this four-day riot in a broader narrative of twentieth-century race relations in Atlanta, in the South, and in the United States, David Fort Godshalk examines the riot's origins and how memories of this cataclysmic event shaped black and white social and political life for decades to come. Nationally, the riot radicalized many civil rights leaders, encouraging W. E. B. Du Bois's confrontationist stance and diminishing the accommodationist voice of Booker T. Washington. In Atlanta, fears of continued disorder prompted white civic leaders to seek dialogue with black elites, establishing a rare biracial tradition that convinced mainstream northern whites that racial reconciliation was possible in the South without national intervention. Paired with black fears of renewed violence, however, this interracial cooperation exacerbated black social divisions and repeatedly undermined black social justice movements, leaving the city among the most segregated and socially stratified in the nation. Analyzing the interwoven struggles of men and women, blacks and whites, social outcasts and national powerbrokers, Godshalk illuminates the possibilities and limits of racial understanding and social change in twentieth-century America.
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Lynching and Vigilantism in the United States

Revolt Against Chivalry : Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women's Campaign Against Lynching . " Ph.D. diss . , Columbia Univ . , 1974. See Diss . Ab . Intl . .

Author:

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313301778

Category: Social Science

Page: 441

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Filling a void in the history of American collective violence, this bibliography includes over 4,200 works dealing with vigilante movements and lynchings.
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