Rome

This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and—most of all—by roving armies.

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

ISBN: 9781501191114

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 149

Download →

“This magnificent love letter to Rome” (Stephen Greenblatt) tells the story of the Eternal City through pivotal moments that defined its history—from the early Roman Republic through the Renaissance and the Reformation to the German occupation in World War Two—“an erudite history that reads like a page-turner” (Maria Semple). Rome, the Eternal City. It is a hugely popular tourist destination with a rich history, famed for such sites as the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, St. Peter’s, and the Vatican. In no other city is history as present as it is in Rome. Today visitors can stand on bridges that Julius Caesar and Cicero crossed; walk around temples in the footsteps of emperors; visit churches from the earliest days of Christianity. This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and—most of all—by roving armies. These have invaded repeatedly, from ancient times to as recently as 1943. Many times Romans have shrugged off catastrophe and remade their city anew. “Matthew Kneale [is] one step ahead of most other Roman chroniclers” (The New York Times Book Review). He paints portraits of the city before seven pivotal assaults, describing what it looked like, felt like, smelled like and how Romans, both rich and poor, lived their everyday lives. He shows how the attacks transformed Rome—sometimes for the better. With drama and humor he brings to life the city of Augustus, of Michelangelo and Bernini, of Garibaldi and Mussolini, and of popes both saintly and very worldly. Rome is “exciting…gripping…a slow roller-coaster ride through the fortunes of a place deeply entangled in its past” (The Wall Street Journal).
Posted in:

The Rome Plague Diaries

He was soon composing daily reports as he tried to comprehend a period of time, when everyone's lives suddenly changed and Italy struggled against an epidemic, that was so strange, so troubling and so fascinating that he found it impossible ...

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher: Atlantic Books (UK)

ISBN: 1838953035

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 314

Download →

A warm and affectionate portrait of a city and a people under lockdown during the Covid-19 crisis, from the award-winning author of Rome: A History in Seven Sackings. On the first morning of Rome's Covid-19 lockdown Matthew Kneale felt an urge to connect with friends and acquaintances and began writing an email, describing where he was, what was happening and what it felt like, and sent it to everyone he could think of. He was soon composing daily reports as he tried to comprehend a period of time, when everyone's lives suddenly changed and Italy struggled against an epidemic, that was so strange, so troubling and so fascinating that he found it impossible to think about anything else. lived in Rome for eighteen years, Matthew has grown to know the capital and its citizens well and this collection of brilliant diary pieces connects what he has learned about the city with this extraordinary, anxious moment, revealing the Romans through the intense prism of the coronavirus crisis.
Posted in:

Rome Plague Diaries

A warm and affectionate portrait of a city and a people under lockdown during the Covid-19 crisis, from the award-winning and Sunday Times bestselling author of Rome: A History in Seven Sackings.

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher:

ISBN: 1838953019

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 707

Download →

Posted in:

Pilgrims

A sweeping tale of intrigue and suspense from the award-winning and Sunday Times bestselling author of Sweet Thames and Rome: A History in Seven Sackings.

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher: Atlantic Books (UK)

ISBN: 1786492393

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 762

Download →

The year 1289. A rich farmer fears he'll go to hell for cheating his neighbours. His wife wants pilgrim badges to sew into her hat and show off at church. A poor, ragged villager is convinced his beloved cat is suffering in the fires of purgatory and must be rescued. A mother is convinced her son's dangerous illness is punishment for her own adultery and seeks forgiveness so he may be cured. A landlord is in trouble with the church after he punched an abbot on the nose. A sexually driven noblewoman seeks a divorce so she can marry her new young beau. These are among a group of pilgrims that sets off on the tough and dangerous journey from England to Rome, where they hope all their troubles will be answered. Some in the party who have their own, secret reasons for going. Matthew Kneale is the author of English Passengers and Rome: A History in Seven Sackings. His new novel, Pilgrims, is a riveting, sweeping narrative that shows medieval society in a new light, as a highly rule-bound, legalistic world, though religious fervour and the threat of violence are never far below the surface. Told by multiple narrators, Pilgrims has much to say about Englishness, then and now.
Posted in:

Water Doors and Buildings Studies in the History of Construction

LXXXVI, no.1, 2018, pp. 163–172. [4] M. Kneale, Rome: A history in seven sackings, London: Atlantic, 2017, p. 6. [5] J. Caesar, The Gallic War. Mineola, New York: Dover, 2006, p. 49. [6] ibid., p. 49. [7] V. Buchwald.

Author: James Campbell

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780992875152

Category: Art

Page: 736

View: 579

Download →

This book contains the 50 papers delivered to the Sixth Annual Conference on Construction History held in Queens' College, Cambridge Cambridge from 5-7 April 2019. The papers are on a wide variety of subjects to do with the history of building construction, with the first section being devoted to papers on water infrastructure.
Posted in:

Alaric the Goth An Outsider s History of the Fall of Rome

Fr. 25. its own version of a catastrophe: Matthew Kneale, Rome: A History in Seven Sackings (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018). No one really understood what they were looking at: Paolo Liverani, “Alarico in Laterano e sull'Esquilino: ...

Author: Douglas Boin

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393635706

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 847

Download →

Denied citizenship by the Roman Empire, a soldier named Alaric changed history by unleashing a surprise attack on the capital city of an unjust empire. Stigmatized and relegated to the margins of Roman society, the Goths were violent “barbarians” who destroyed “civilization,” at least in the conventional story of Rome’s collapse. But a slight shift of perspective brings their history, and ours, shockingly alive. Alaric grew up near the river border that separated Gothic territory from Roman. He survived a border policy that separated migrant children from their parents, and he was denied benefits he likely expected from military service. Romans were deeply conflicted over who should enjoy the privileges of citizenship. They wanted to buttress their global power, but were insecure about Roman identity; they depended on foreign goods, but scoffed at and denied foreigners their own voices and humanity. In stark contrast to the rising bigotry, intolerance, and zealotry among Romans during Alaric’s lifetime, the Goths, as practicing Christians, valued religious pluralism and tolerance. The marginalized Goths, marked by history as frightening harbingers of destruction and of the Dark Ages, preserved virtues of the ancient world that we take for granted. The three nights of riots Alaric and the Goths brought to the capital struck fear into the hearts of the powerful, but the riots were not without cause. Combining vivid storytelling and historical analysis, Douglas Boin reveals the Goths’ complex and fascinating legacy in shaping our world.
Posted in:

Powers and Thrones

A New History of the Middle Ages Dan Jones ... see Thomas F. Sea, “The German Princes' Responses to the Peasants' Revolt of 1525,” Central European History 40, no. ... Kneale, Rome: A History in Seven Sackings, 194. 52.

Author: Dan Jones

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781984880888

Category: History

Page: 656

View: 837

Download →

"Not only an engrossing read about the distant past, both informative and entertaining, but also a profoundly thought-provoking view of our not-really-so-‘new’ present . . . All medieval history is here, beautifully narrated . . . The vision takes in whole imperial landscapes but also makes room for intimate portraits of key individuals, and even some poems."—Wall Street Journal "A lively history . . . [Jones] has managed to touch every major topic. As each piece of the puzzle is placed into position, the modern world gradually comes into view . . . Powers and Thrones provides the reader with a framework for understanding a complicated subject, and it tells the story of an essential era of world history with skill and style."—The New York Times The New York Times bestselling author returns with an epic history of the medieval world—a rich and complicated reappraisal of an era whose legacy and lessons we are still living with today. When the once-mighty city of Rome was sacked by barbarians in 410 and lay in ruins, it signaled the end of an era--and the beginning of a thousand years of profound transformation. In a gripping narrative bursting with big names—from Sts Augustine and Attila the Hun to the Prophet Muhammad and Eleanor of Aquitaine—Dan Jones charges through the history of the Middle Ages. Powers and Thrones takes readers on a journey through an emerging Europe, the great capitals of late Antiquity, as well as the influential cities of the Islamic West, and culminates in the first European voyages to the Americas. The medieval world was forged by the big forces that still occupy us today: climate change, pandemic disease, mass migration, and technological revolutions. This was the time when the great European nationalities were formed; when the basic Western systems of law and governance were codified; when the Christian Churches matured as both powerful institutions and the regulators of Western public morality; and when art, architecture, philosophical inquiry and scientific invention went through periods of massive, revolutionary change. The West was rebuilt on the ruins of an empire and emerged from a state of crisis and collapse to dominate the world. Every sphere of human life and activity was transformed in the thousand years covered by Powers and Thrones. As we face a critical turning point in our own millennium, Dan Jones shows that how we got here matters more than ever.
Posted in:

The Romans

Adrian Goldsworthy, Augustus: First Emperor of Rome (New Haven, Connecticut: Yale, 2014). Adrian Goldsworthy, Antony and Cleopatra (New ... Matthew Kneale, Rome: A History in Seven Sackings (New York, New York: Simon & Schuster, 2018).

Author: Grace Cole

Publisher: New Word City

ISBN: 9781612307794

Category: History

Page: 155

View: 926

Download →

Here is the story of Rome and the men and women who made it the greatest empire the world has ever known. Historian Grace Cole writes in vivid detail of the critical events in Rome’s 500-year history and of the complex, flawed leaders - Caesar, Augustus, Caligula, and Constantine – who steered it through the storms of history.
Posted in:

Rome s Third Samnite War 298 290 BC

621–622 (Published by Trustees of Boston University Stable). Kneale, Matthew, Rome: A History in Seven Sackings (Atlantic Books, main edition 2018). Lane Fox, Robin, The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian (Penguin ...

Author: Mike Roberts

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526744111

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 597

Download →

The Third Samnite War (298-290 BC) was a crucial episode in the early history of Rome. Upon its outcome rested mastery of central Italy, and the independent survival of both Rome and the Samnites. Determined to resist aggressive Roman expansion, the Samnites forged a powerful alliance with the Senones (a tribe of Italian Gauls), Etruscans and Umbrians. The result was eight years of hard campaigning, brutal sieges and bitter battles that stretched Rome to the limit. The desperate nature of the struggle is illustrated by the ritual self-sacrifice (devotio) by the Roman consul Publius Decimus Mus at the Battle of Sentinum (295 BC), which restored the resolve of the wavering Roman troops, and by the Samnite Linen Legion at the Battle of Aquilonia (393 BC), each man of which was bound by a sacred oath to conquer or die on the battlefield. Mike Roberts, who has travelled the Italian landscape upon which these events played out, mines the sources (which are more reliable, he argues, than for Rome’s previous wars) to produce a compelling narrative of this momentous conflict.
Posted in:

The Rome Plague Diaries

... Kingdom English Passengers Small Crimes in an Age of Abundance When We Were Romans Sweet Thames NON-FICTION An Atheist's History of Belief Rome: A History in Seven Sackings The Rome Plague Diaries Lockdown Life in the Eternal City.

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN: 9781838953027

Category: Travel

Page: 188

View: 108

Download →

On the first morning of Rome's Covid-19 lockdown Matthew Kneale felt an urge to connect with friends and acquaintances and began writing an email, describing where he was, what was happening and what it felt like, and sent it to everyone he could think of. He was soon composing daily reports as he tried to comprehend a period of time, when everyone's lives suddenly changed and Italy struggled against an epidemic, that was so strange, so troubling and so fascinating that he found it impossible to think about anything else. Having lived in Rome for eighteen years, Matthew has grown to know the capital and its citizens well and this collection of brilliant diary pieces connects what he has learned about the city with this extraordinary, anxious moment, revealing the Romans through the intense prism of the coronavirus crisis.
Posted in: