Russian Literature and Its Demons

And yet, despite its evident centrality to Russian culture, the unique and fascinating phenomenon of Russian literary demonism has so far received little critical attention. This substantial collection fills the gap.

Author: Pamela Davidson

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1571817581

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 530

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Merezhkovsky's bold claim that "all Russian literature is, to a certain degree, a struggle with the temptation of demonism" is undoubtedly justified. And yet, despite its evident centrality to Russian culture, the unique and fascinating phenomenon of Russian literary demonism has so far received little critical attention. This substantial collection fills the gap. A comprehensive analytical introduction by the editor is follwed by a series of fourteen essays, written by eminent scholars in their fields. The first part explores the main shaping contexts of literary demonism: the Russian Orthodox and folk tradition, the demonization of historical figures, and views of art as intrinsically demonic. The second part traces the development of a literary tradition of demonism in the works of authors ranging from Pushkin and Lermontov, Gogol and Dostoevsky, through to the poets and prose writers of modernism (including Blok, Akhmatova, Bely, Sologub, Rozanov, Zamiatin), and through to the end of the 20th century.
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The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature

However one may choose to regard the Soviet and East European brands of ... Russian Literature and its Demons, New York and Oxford: Berghaho Books, 2000.

Author: Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134569069

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 124

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The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is an engaging and accessible guide to Russian writing of the past thousand years. The volume covers the entire span of Russian literature, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet period, and explores all the forms that have made it so famous: poetry, drama and, of course, the Russian novel. A particular emphasis is given to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when Russian literature achieved world-wide recognition through the works of writers such as Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov and Solzhenitsyn. Covering a range of subjects including women's writing, Russian literary theory, socialist realism and émigré writing, leading international scholars open up the wonderful diversity of Russian literature. With recommended lists of further reading and an excellent up-to-date general bibliography, The Routledge Companion to Russian Literature is the perfect guide for students and general readers alike.
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Vicissitudes of Genre in the Russian Novel

The 1860s witnessed one of the most vibrant periods in the history of modern Russian literature. This book focuses on what was arguably its most influential genre - the Russian tendentious novel.

Author: Russell Scott Valentino

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: STANFORD:36105110335911

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 166

View: 383

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The 1860s witnessed one of the most vibrant periods in the history of modern Russian literature. This book focuses on what was arguably its most influential genre - the Russian tendentious novel. While tracing the genre's early development through works such as Fathers and Sons and Notes from Underground, it simultaneously unfolds a unique approach to reading late-nineteenth-century Russian literature by showing how rich conflicting interpretations of the classics continue to be possible and by indicating numerous deep-rooted connections between the tendentious novels of the nineteenth century and their twentieth-century literary progeny.
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The Little Demon

During the perestroika and post-Soviet periods, a plethora of new editions appeared in Russia (1988, 1989, 1991). The final 'canonization' of the novel is ...

Author: Fyodor Sologub

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141392943

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 704

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A dark classic of Russia's silver age, this blackly funny novel recounts a schoolteacher's descent into sadism, arson and murder. Mad, lascivious, sadistic and ridiculous, the provincial schoolteacher Peredonov torments his students and has hallucinatory fantasies about acts of savagery and degradation, yet to everyone else he is an upstanding member of society. As he pursues the idea of marrying to gain promotion, he descends into paranoia, sexual perversion, arson, torture and murder. Sologub's anti-hero is one of the great comic monsters of twentieth-century fiction, subsequently lending his name to the brand of sado-masochism known as Peredonovism. The Little Demon (1907) made an immediate star of its author who, refuting suggestions that the work was autobiographical, stated 'No, my dear contemporaries ... it is about you'. This grotesque mirror of a spiritually bankrupt society is arguably the finest Russian novel to have come out of the Symbolist movement. Fyodor Sologub was born in St Petersburg in 1863. His first two novels Bad Dreams (1896) and The Little Demon (1907) were drawn from his own experiences as schoolmaster in a remote provincial town. For many years Sologub could not find a publisher for The Little Demon but when in 1907 the novel was at last published - to immediate and resounding success - he was able to leave his restricting career and devote himself to literature. In 1921 his wife committed suicide and Sologub died a few years later in 1927. Ronald Wilks studied Russian language and literature at Trinity College,Cambridge, after training as a Naval interpreter, and later Russian literature at London University. He has translated many works from Russian for Penguin Classics, including books by Gorky, Gogol, Pushkin, Tolstoy and Chekhov.
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Redefining Russian Literary Diaspora 1920 2020

Her books include Russian Literature and its Demons, The Poetic Imagination of Vyacheslav Ivanov, an anthology of poems dedicated to Anna Akhmatova, ...

Author: Maria Rubins

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 9781787359413

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 328

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Over the century that has passed since the start of the massive post-revolutionary exodus, Russian literature has thrived in multiple locations around the globe. What happens to cultural vocabularies, politics of identity, literary canon and language when writers transcend the metropolitan and national boundaries and begin to negotiate new experience gained in the process of migration? Redefining Russian Literary Diaspora, 1920-2020 sets a new agenda for the study of Russian diaspora writing, countering its conventional reception as a subsidiary branch of national literature and reorienting the field from an excessive emphasis on the homeland and origins to an analysis of transnational circulations that shape extraterritorial cultural practices. Integrating a variety of conceptual perspectives, ranging from diaspora and postcolonial studies to the theories of translation and self-translation, World Literature and evolutionary literary criticism, the contributors argue for a distinct nature of diasporic literary expression predicated on hybridity, ambivalence and a sense of multiple belonging. As the complementary case studies demonstrate, diaspora narratives consistently recode historical memory, contest the mainstream discourses of Russianness, rewrite received cultural tropes and explore topics that have remained marginal or taboo in the homeland. These diverse discussions are framed by a focused examination of diaspora as a methodological perspective and its relevance for the modern human condition.
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Russian Literature A Very Short Introduction

Chapter 7 J. Andrew, Narrative and Desire in Russian Literature: The Feminine ... Russian Literature and its Demons (London, 2000); S. Hutchings, Russian ...

Author: Catriona Kelly

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780192801449

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 164

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This text explores the place and importance of literature of all sorts in Russian culture and aims to answer the questions: How and when did a Russian national literature come into being? and What shaped its creation?
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Stalin in Russian Satire 1917 1991

Mozejko, “The Steel Bird and Aksënov's Prose of the Seventies,”213. ... Literary Demonism and Orthodox Tradition,” in Russian Literature and Its Demons, ed.

Author: Karen L. Ryan

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299234436

Category: History

Page: 241

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During Stalin’s lifetime the crimes of his regime were literally unspeakable. More than fifty years after his death, Russia is still coming to terms with Stalinism and the people’s own role in the abuses of the era. During the decades of official silence that preceded the advent of glasnost, Russian writers raised troubling questions about guilt, responsibility, and the possibility of absolution. Through the subtle vehicle of satire, they explored the roots and legacy of Stalinism in forms ranging from humorous mockery to vitriolic diatribe. Examining works from the 1917 Revolution to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, Karen L. Ryan reveals how satirical treatments of Stalin often emphasize his otherness, distancing him from Russian culture. Some satirists portray Stalin as a madman. Others show him as feminized, animal-like, monstrous, or diabolical. Stalin has also appeared as the unquiet dead, a spirit that keeps returning to haunt the collective memory of the nation. While many writers seem anxious to exorcise Stalin from the body politic, for others he illuminates the self in disturbing ways. To what degree Stalin was and is “in us” is a central question of all these works. Although less visible than public trials, policy shifts, or statements of apology, Russian satire has subtly yet insistently participated in the protracted process of de-Stalinization.
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Jews and Ukrainians in Russia s Literary Borderlands

From the Shtetl Fair to the Petersburg Bookshop Amelia Glaser ... Brief Survey of Ukrainian Literature. ... Russian Literature and Its Demons.

Author: Amelia Glaser

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 9780810127968

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 281

View: 114

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Studies of Eastern European literature have largely confined themselves to a single language, culture, or nationality. In this highly original book, Glaser shows how writers working in Russian, Ukrainian, and Yiddish during much of the nineteenth century and the early part of the twentieth century were in intense conversation with one another. The marketplace was both the literal locale at which members of these different societies and cultures interacted with one another and a rich subject for representation in their art. It is commonplace to note the influence of Gogol on Russian literature, but Glaser shows him to have been a profound influence on Ukrainian and Yiddish literature as well. And she shows how Gogol must be understood not only within the context of his adopted city of St. Petersburg but also that of his native Ukraine. As Ukrainian and Yiddish literatures developed over this period, they were shaped by their geographical and cultural position on the margins of the Russian Empire. As distinctive as these writers may seem from one another, they are further illuminated by an appreciation of their common relationship to Russia. Glaser’s book paints a far more complicated portrait than scholars have traditionally allowed of Jewish (particularly Yiddish) literature in the context of Eastern European and Russian culture.
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Russian Tales of Demonic Possession

In Russian Literature and Its Demons, edited by Pamela Davidson, 1–28. New York: Berghahn, 2000. Davidson, Pamela, ed. Russian Literature and ItsDemons.

Author: Marcia A. Morris

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739188613

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 172

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Russian Tales of Demonic Possession: Translations of Savva Grudtsyn and Solomonia provides detailed introductions and full translation of the seventeenth-century Tale of Savva Grudtsyn and Tale of the Demoniac Solomonia as well as of Aleksey Remizov’s modernist re-workings of the two tales, The Demoniacs. These works provide insight into Russian culture in the seventeenth century and how beliefs changed over time.
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Suicide and the Body Politic in Imperial Russia

and when a demon himself lights the lamps only to show everything not in its real form ... On St. Petersburg in Russian literature more generally , see the ...

Author: Susan K. Morrissey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139460811

Category: History

Page:

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In early twentieth-century Russia, suicide became a public act and a social phenomenon of exceptional scale, a disquieting emblem of Russia's encounter with modernity. This book draws on an extensive range of sources, from judicial records to the popular press, to examine the forms, meanings, and regulation of suicide from the seventeenth century to 1914, placing developments into a pan-European context. It argues against narratives of secularization that read the history of suicide as a trajectory from sin to insanity, crime to social problem, and instead focuses upon the cultural politics of self-destruction. Suicide - the act, the body, the socio-medical problem - became the site on which diverse authorities were established and contested, not just the priest or the doctor but also the sovereign, the public, and the individual. This panoramic history of modern Russia, told through the prism of suicide, rethinks the interaction between cultural forms, individual agency, and systems of governance.
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Literature History and Identity in Post Soviet Russia 1991 2006

29 Russian literature remains to be written ( or several histories , since any claims ... Russian Literature and its Demons ( Oxford : 2000 ) , pp.473–511 .

Author: Rosalind J. Marsh

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3039110691

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 594

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"The aim of this book is to explore some of the main pre-occupations of literature, culture and criticism dealing with historical themes in post-Soviet Russia, focusing mainly on literature in the years 1991 to 2006." --introd.
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A Devil s Vaudeville

The tendency of nineteenth-century Russian literature to “internalize” or ... Views of Art as Demonic,” in Davidson, Russian Literature and its Demons, pp.

Author: William J. Leatherbarrow

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 9780810120495

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

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A study of the 'demonic markers' that run throughout Dostoevsky's fiction, this also explores the narrative and generic implications of the way Dostoevsky inscribed the demonic in his fictional works - implications that point to a new understanding of familiar concepts in the work of this Russian master.
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Conspiracy Culture

Davidson, Pamela. “Divine Service or Idol Worship? Russian Views of Art as Demonic.” In Davidson, Russian Literature and Its Demons, ...

Author: Keith A. Livers

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487507374

Category: History

Page: 320

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This book examines the uses of conspiracy tropes in post-Soviet culture, providing the first systematic, in-depth analysis of Russia's most "paranoid" contemporary authors.
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Personality and Place in Russian Culture

'Besy', Disorientation and the Person ROBIN AIZLEWOOD One of the ... for one of the epigraphs and the title of his novel Besy ([The] Demons/Devils/The ...

Author: Simon Dixon

Publisher: MHRA

ISBN: 9781907322037

Category: History

Page: 435

View: 438

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Lindsey Hughes (1949-2007) made her reputation as one of the foremost historians of the age of Peter the Great by revealing the more freakish aspects of the tsar's complex mind and reconstructing the various physical environments in which he lived. Contributors to Personality and Place in Russian Culture were encouraged to develop any of the approaches featured in Hughes's work: pointillist and panoramic, playful and morbid, quotidian and bizarre. The result is a rich and original collection, ranging from the sixteenth century to the present day, in which a group of leading international scholars explore the role of the individual in Russian culture, the myriad variety of individual lives, and the changing meanings invested in particular places. The editor, Simon Dixon, is Sir Bernard Pares Professor of Russian History at UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies.
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On the Dark Side of Russian Literature 1709 1910

The book examines two centuries of Russian literary development and studies in major writers of the time the consequences of the clash between two irreconcilable cultures, the politically despotic Russian and the humanistic European.

Author: Constantin V. Ponomareff

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: UCSC:32106008604818

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 261

View: 448

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The book examines two centuries of Russian literary development and studies in major writers of the time the consequences of the clash between two irreconcilable cultures, the politically despotic Russian and the humanistic European. The author holds that the spiritual and creative results of this inner rift led from moral ambivalence to despair and ultimately to a nihilist vision of reality.
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Demons

Demons is an anti-nihilistic novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It is the third of the four great novels written by Dostoyevsky after his return from Siberian exile, the others being Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov.

Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Publisher: Aegitas

ISBN: 9781773139821

Category: Fiction

Page: 733

View: 861

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Demons is an anti-nihilistic novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It is the third of the four great novels written by Dostoyevsky after his return from Siberian exile, the others being Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Demons is a social and political satire, a psychological drama, and large scale tragedy.
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A History of Russian Literature

The Demon, at which he worked from 1829-33, was resumed in 1837 during his stay in Georgia and completed in 1839. The theme is the love of a demon for a ...

Author: D.S. Mirsky

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000386677

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 556

View: 134

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This book, first published in 1949, is an abridged version of Mirsky’s classic two texts on Russian literature, updated with a postscript by the editor assessing the development of Soviet literature. Beautifully written, Mirsky’s analyses of Russian writers and literature go hand in hand with his takes on Russian history. From the birth of Russian literature to its Soviet form, this book is a lively and comprehensive examination by one of its leading scholars.
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The Ethics of the Poet

56–76 Brodsky, Joseph, 'The Condition We Call ''Exile''', in Literature in ... and Blok', in Russian Literature and its Demons, ed. by Pamela Davidson, ...

Author: Ute Stock

Publisher: MHRA

ISBN: 9781904350415

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 177

View: 580

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This study rehabilitates Tsvetaeva as a serious, innovative ethical thinker who developed an ethics for the poet that could dispense with universal value guarantees. For Tsvetaeva, ethical judgements had to be individual rather than universal, open to revision rather than permanent. Examining her ideational background, the study sheds new light on the pre-exile years, when Tsvetaeva suffered from a profound uncertainty about the moral nature and duty of the poet. It identifies the experience of exile as a catalyst for the development of her ethical thought that culminated in 'Iskusstvo pri svete sovesti'. Considering Tsvetaeva's application of her ethics in her life, this study reveals her emphasis on the personal to be the direct result of her ethical belief in individual judgements. Her conscious effort persistently to counteract dominant political ideologies similarly stems from her ethical suspicion of any kind of claim on universal truth. Finally the study assesses the significance of Tsvetaeva's suicide, revealing it to be the inevitable, terrifying consequence of her ethical self-definition, her commitment to individual freedom, and the pursuit of higher truths.
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The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters

Russian Literature and its Demons. New York: Berghahn, 2000. Rudwin, Maximilian. The Devil in Legend and Literature. Chicago: The Open Court Company, 1931.

Author: Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317044253

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

View: 568

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From vampires and demons to ghosts and zombies, interest in monsters in literature, film, and popular culture has never been stronger. This concise Encyclopedia provides scholars and students with a comprehensive and authoritative A-Z of monsters throughout the ages. It is the first major reference book on monsters for the scholarly market. Over 200 entries written by experts in the field are accompanied by an overview introduction by the editor. Generic entries such as 'ghost' and 'vampire' are cross-listed with important specific manifestations of that monster. In addition to monsters appearing in English-language literature and film, the Encyclopedia also includes significant monsters in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, African and Middle Eastern traditions. Alphabetically organized, the entries each feature suggestions for further reading. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters is an invaluable resource for all students and scholars and an essential addition to library reference shelves.
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