Science and Religion

Written by distinguished historians of science and religion, the thirty essays in this volume survey the relationship of Western religious traditions to science from the beginning of the Christian era to the late twentieth century.

Author: Gary B. Ferngren

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801870385

Category: Religion

Page: 401

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Written by distinguished historians of science and religion, the thirty essays in this volume survey the relationship of Western religious traditions to science from the beginning of the Christian era to the late twentieth century. This wide-ranging collection also introduces a variety of approaches to understanding their intersection, suggesting a model not of inalterable conflict, but of complex interaction. Tracing the rise of science from its birth in the medieval West through the scientific revolution, the contributors describe major shifts that were marked by discoveries such as those of Copernicus, Galileo, and Isaac Newton and the Catholic and Protestant reactions to them. They assess changes in scientific understanding brought about by eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transformations in geology, cosmology, and biology, together with the responses of both mainstream religious groups and such newer movements as evangelicalism and fundamentalism. The book also treats the theological implications of contemporary science and evaluates recent approaches such as environmentalism, gender studies, social construction, and postmodernism, which are at the center of current debates in the historiography, understanding, and application of science. Contributors: Colin A. Russell, David B. Wilson, Edward Grant, David C. Lindberg, Alnoor Dhanani, Owen Gingerich, Richard J. Blackwell, Edward B. Davis, Michael P. Winship, John Henry, Margaret J. Osler, Richard S. Westfall, John Hedley Brooke, Nicolaas A. Rupke, Peter M. Hess, James Moore, Peter J. Bowler, Ronald L. Numbers, Steven J. Harris, Mark A. Noll, Edward J. Larson, Richard Olson, Craig Sean McConnell, Robin Collins, William A. Dembski, David N. Livingstone, Sara Miles, and Stephen P. Weldon.
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How to Relate Science and Religion

Stenmark (philosophy of religion, Uppsala University, Sweden) replaces the paradigm of science and religion as opposing perspectives with a conciliatory model.

Author: Mikael Stenmark

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 080282823X

Category: Religion

Page: 287

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Today there are two very different views concerning the relation of science and religion. On the one hand is the view that there is no limit to the competency of science, including its ability to subsume the traditional domains of religion and values. On the other hand is the view that science ought to itself be shaped in a significant way by religion. In this book these opposing views are presented, critically discussed, and replaced with a badly needed conciliatory model of science and religion. Written by Templeton Prize-winner Mikael Stenmark, How to Relate Science and Religion points an exciting way forward in the effort to reconcile what are arguably the two most powerful cultural forces of our time. Stenmark succinctly lays out the central issues of the debate and shows what is at stake for the nature and advancement of human knowledge. The outcome of Stenmark's work is the construction of a "multidimensional model" of science and religion that refuses to automatically prioritize either. Stenmark shows the ongoing though shifting value of both science and religion played out as a dynamic, evolving relationship.
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Science and Religion

Bringing together leading scholars, this volume explores the history and changing meanings of the categories 'science' and 'religion'; the role of publishing and education in forging and spreading ideas; the connection between knowledge, ...

Author: Thomas Dixon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107404118

Category: Religion

Page: 332

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The idea of an inevitable conflict between science and religion was decisively challenged by John Hedley Brooke in his classic Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives (Cambridge, 1991). Almost two decades on, Science and Religion: New Historical Perspectives revisits this argument and asks how historians can now impose order on the complex and contingent histories of religious engagements with science. Bringing together leading scholars, this volume explores the history and changing meanings of the categories 'science' and 'religion'; the role of publishing and education in forging and spreading ideas; the connection between knowledge, power and intellectual imperialism; and the reasons for the confrontation between evolution and creationism among American Christians and in the Islamic world. A major contribution to the historiography of science and religion, this book makes the most recent scholarship on this much misunderstood debate widely accessible.
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Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths about Science and Religion

If we want nonscientists and opinion-makers in the press, the lab, and the pulpit to take a fresh look at the relationship between science and religion, Ronald L. Numbers suggests that we must first dispense with the hoary myths that have ...

Author: Ronald L. Numbers

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674057418

Category: Science

Page: 320

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If we want nonscientists and opinion-makers in the press, the lab, and the pulpit to take a fresh look at the relationship between science and religion, Ronald L. Numbers suggests that we must first dispense with the hoary myths that have masqueraded too long as historical truths. Until about the 1970s, the dominant narrative in the history of science had long been that of science triumphant, and science at war with religion. But a new generation of historians both of science and of the church began to examine episodes in the history of science and religion through the values and knowledge of the actors themselves. Now Ronald Numbers has recruited the leading scholars in this new history of science to puncture the myths, from Galileo’s incarceration to Darwin’s deathbed conversion to Einstein’s belief in a personal God who “didn’t play dice with the universe.” The picture of science and religion at each other’s throats persists in mainstream media and scholarly journals, but each chapter in Galileo Goes to Jail shows how much we have to gain by seeing beyond the myths.
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Science Faith and Society

On its appearance in 1946 the book quickly became the focus of controversy.

Author: Michael Polanyi

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226672905

Category: Philosophy

Page: 96

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In its concern with science as an essentially human enterprise, Science, Faith and Society makes an original and challenging contribution to the philosophy of science. On its appearance in 1946 the book quickly became the focus of controversy. Polanyi aims to show that science must be understood as a community of inquirers held together by a common faith; science, he argues, is not the use of "scientific method" but rather consists in a discipline imposed by scientists on themselves in the interests of discovering an objective, impersonal truth. That such truth exists and can be found is part of the scientists' faith. Polanyi maintains that both authoritarianism and scepticism, attacking this faith, are attacking science itself.
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Religion and the Sciences of Origins

This book also invites the reader into the relevant literature with ample quotations from original texts.

Author: Kelly James Clark

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137414816

Category: Religion

Page: 274

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This concise introduction to science and religion focuses on Christianity and modern Western science (the epicenter of issues in science and religion in the West) with a concluding chapter on Muslim and Jewish Science and Religion. This book also invites the reader into the relevant literature with ample quotations from original texts.
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Where the Conflict Really Lies

Argues that the conflict between theism and science does not exist and that the debate is actually between theism and naturalism, a philosophy rooted in the belief that there is no such being as God.

Author: Alvin Plantinga

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 9780199812097

Category: Philosophy

Page: 359

View: 367

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Argues that the conflict between theism and science does not exist and that the debate is actually between theism and naturalism, a philosophy rooted in the belief that there is no such being as God.
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Magic Science and Religion

2015 Reprint of 1954 Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition. Not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software.

Author: Bronislaw Malinowski

Publisher:

ISBN: 1614277796

Category: Religion

Page: 92

View: 324

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2015 Reprint of 1954 Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition. Not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. In his handling of science, magic, and religion, Malinowski essentially accepted the traditional Western conception of a dual reality-the reality of the natural world, grounded in observation and rational procedures that lead to mastery, and supernatural reality, grounded in emotional needs that give rise to faith. Unlike Frazer, for example, Malinowski derived science not from magic but from man's capacity to organize knowledge, as demonstrated by Trobriand technical skills in gardening, shipbuilding, etc. In contrast, he treated magic, which coexisted with these skills, as an organized response to a sense of limitation and impotence in the face of danger, difficulty, and frustration. Again, he differentiated between magic and religion in defining magical systems as essentially pragmatic in their aims and religious systems as self-fulfilling rituals organized, for example, around life crises.
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Rethinking History Science and Religion

This volume evaluates the utility of the “complexity principle” in past, present, and future scholarship.

Author: Bernard Lightman

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822945746

Category: Science

Page: 317

View: 965

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The historical interface between science and religion was depicted as an unbridgeable conflict in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Starting in the 1970s, such a conception was too simplistic and not at all accurate when considering the totality of that relationship. This volume evaluates the utility of the “complexity principle” in past, present, and future scholarship. First put forward by historian John Brooke over twenty-five years ago, the complexity principle rejects the idea of a single thesis of conflict or harmony, or integration or separation, between science and religion. Rethinking History, Science, and Religion brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars at the forefront of their fields to consider whether new approaches to the study of science and culture—such as recent developments in research on science and the history of publishing, the global history of science, the geographical examination of space and place, and science and media—have cast doubt on the complexity thesis, or if it remains a serviceable historiographical model.
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Science Religion and Health

A theologian who does not take full advantage of the way psychology illumines theology is not serious about the work of theology.

Author: Jay Harold Ellens

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532601774

Category: Religion

Page: 134

View: 155

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Psychology and theology interface at four levels: theory development, research process, data collection, and clinical operation. At each level they connect in the model of humanness (anthropology) forming and functioning there; and in that model of humanness it is in personality theory that psychology illumes theology and that psychology illumines theology. A theologian who does not take full advantage of the way psychology illumines theology is not serious about the work of theology. A psychologist who does not take full advantage of the way theology illumines psychology is not serious about the field and practice of psychology. Science, Religion, and Health explains in readable style how that interface and mutual illumination works, and why it is crucial for Christian psychotherapists and pastors.
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Dictionary of Christianity and Science

" --Scot McKnight, Northern Seminary "This is an invaluable resource that belongs in every Christian's library. I will be keeping my copy close by when I’m writing.

Author: Zondervan,

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN: 9780310496069

Category: Religion

Page: 704

View: 946

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The definitive reference work on science and Christian belief How does Christian theology relate to scientific inquiry? What are the competing philosophies of science, and do they "work" with a Christian faith based on the Bible? No reference work has covered this terrain sufficiently--until now. Featuring entries from over 140 international contributors, the Dictionary of Christianity and Science is a deeply-researched, peer-reviewed, fair-minded work that illuminates the intersection of science and Christian belief. In one volume, you get reliable summaries and critical analyses of over 450 relevant concepts, theories, terms, movements, individuals, and debates. You will find answers to your toughest questions about faith and science, from the existence of Adam and Eve to the age of the earth, evolution and string theory. FEATURES INCLUDE: Over 450 entries that will help you think through some of today's most challenging scientific topics, including climate change, evolution, bioethics, and much more Essays from over 140 leading international scholars, including Francis Beckwith, Michael Behe, Darrell Bock, William Lane Craig, Hugh Ross, Craig Keener, Davis Young, John Walton, and many more Multiple-view essays on controversial topics allow you to understand and compare differing Christian viewpoints Learn about flesh-and-blood figures who have shaped the interaction of science and religion: Augustine, Aquinas, Bacon, Darwin, and Stephen Hawking are just the beginning Fully cross-referenced, entries include references and recommendations for further reading Advance Praise: "Every Christian studying science will want a copy within arm’s reach." --Scot McKnight, Northern Seminary "This is an invaluable resource that belongs in every Christian's library. I will be keeping my copy close by when I’m writing." --Lee Strobel, Elizabeth and John Gibson chair of apologetics, Houston Baptist University "Sparkles with passion, controversy, and diverse perspectives."--Karl Giberson, professor of science and religion, Stonehill College "An impressive resource that presents a broad range of topics from a broad tent of evangelical scholars."--Michael R. Licona, Houston Baptist University "I am certain that this dictionary will serve the church for many years in leading many to demonstrate that modern science can glorify our Creator and honor his creation." --Denis O. Lamoureux, University of Alberta "'Dictionary' is too humble a label for what this is! I anticipate that this will offer valuable guidance for Christian faithfulness." --C. John Collins, Covenant Theological Seminary Get answers to the difficult questions surround faith and science! Adam and Eve | the Age of the Earth | Climate Change | Evolution | Fossil Record | Genesis Flood | Miracles | Cosmology | Big Bang theory | Bioethics | Darwinism Death | Extraterrestrial Life | Multiverse | String theory | and much, much more
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A John Haught Reader

The readings in this book, however, suggest that the ancient Abrahamic hope for the coming of God from out of the future may now become the foundation of a scientifically up-to-date theology of nature that affirms divine transcendence ...

Author: John F. Haught

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532661044

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 792

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Classical Christian theologies came to expression at a time when the universe seemed relatively fixed and unchanging. The otherworldly spiritual instincts of many religions reflected a static, vertical, and hierarchical understanding of the natural world. Today, however, especially because of developments in the sciences, it appears that the universe is still coming into being. The writings offered in this book reflect their author's belief that if the universe is unfinished, new thoughts about God and all the traditional theological topics are essential to make sense of it all. John Haught argues that the universe is best understood according to the metaphor of drama rather than design. This means that the most important question in science and theology today is not whether the intricate complexity of life points to a deity, or even how God acts in nature, but whether the cosmic drama as a whole carries a meaning. Unfortunately, the devotional life of most religious people on our planet still presupposes an essentially immobile universe. Christian instruction, for example, continues to nurture an otherworldly piety that estranges nature unnecessarily from God. The readings in this book, however, suggest that the ancient Abrahamic hope for the coming of God from out of the future may now become the foundation of a scientifically up-to-date theology of nature that affirms divine transcendence without robbing nature of its significance.
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An Illusion of Harmony

As physicist Taner Edis shows in this fascinating glimpse into contemporary Muslim culture, a good deal of popular writing in Muslim societies attempts to address such perplexing questions as: - Is Islam a "scientific religion"?

Author: Taner Edis

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 9781615922505

Category: Religion

Page: 265

View: 199

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Current discussions in the West on the relation of science and religion focus mainly on science's uneasy relationship with the traditional Judeo-Christian view of life. But a parallel controversy exists in the Muslim world regarding ways to integrate science with Islam. As physicist Taner Edis shows in this fascinating glimpse into contemporary Muslim culture, a good deal of popular writing in Muslim societies attempts to address such perplexing questions as:· Is Islam a scientific religion?· Were the discoveries of modern science foreshadowed in the Quran?· Are intelligent design conjectures more appealing to the Muslim perspective than Darwinian explanations?Edis examines the range of Muslim thinking about science and Islam, from blatantly pseudoscientific fantasies to comparatively sophisticated efforts to Islamize science. From the world's strongest creationist movements to bizarre science-in-the-Quran apologetics, popular Muslim approaches promote a view of natural science as a mere fact-collecting activity that coexists in near-perfect harmony with literal-minded faith. Since Muslims are keenly aware that science and technology have been the keys to Western success, they are eager to harness technology to achieve a Muslim version of modernity. Yet at the same time, they are reluctant to allow science to become independent of religion and are suspicious of Western secularization.Edis examines all of these conflicting trends, revealing the difficulties facing Muslim societies trying to adapt to the modern technological world. His discussions of both the parallels and the differences between Western and Muslim attempts to harmonize science and religion make for a unique and intriguing contribution to this continuing debate.Taner Edis (Kirksville, MO), born and raised in Turkey, is an associate professor of physics at Truman State University and the author of The Ghost in the Universe: God in Light of Modern Science and Science and Nonbelief, among other publications.
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Has Science Killed God

20 papers from the Faraday Institute, by some of the world's leading scientists, philosophers and theologians, on current and future issues surrounding science and faith. Professor Alister McGrath contributes an introductory essay.

Author: Denis Alexander

Publisher:

ISBN: 0281081344

Category:

Page: 240

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20 papers from the Faraday Institute, by some of the world's leading scientists, philosophers and theologians, on current and future issues surrounding science and faith. Professor Alister McGrath contributes an introductory essay.
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When Worlds Converge

In this book, over 30 prominent scientists, theologians, and philosophers explore three main convergences: the convergence of different sciences to give a coherent story of mankind, religious convergence whereby different traditions work ...

Author: Clifford N. Matthews

Publisher: Open Court Publishing

ISBN: UVA:X004593448

Category: Religion

Page: 403

View: 488

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In this book, over 30 prominent scientists, theologians, and philosophers explore three main convergences: the convergence of different sciences to give a coherent story of mankind, religious convergence whereby different traditions work together toward global harmony, and the convergence of science and religion.
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Asian Religions Technology and Science

This volume explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of the relationship between religion, technology and science with a focus on South and East Asia.

Author: István Keul

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317674481

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 653

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Over the past five decades, the field of religion-and-science scholarship has experienced a considerable expansion. This volume explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of the relationship between religion, technology and science with a focus on South and East Asia. These three areas are not seen as monolithic entities, but as discursive fields embedded in dynamic processes of cultural exchange and transformation. Bridging these arenas of knowledge and practice traditionally seen as distinct and disconnected, the book reflects on the ways of exploring the various dimensions of their interconnection. Through its various chapters, the collection provides an examination of the use of modern scientific concepts in the theologies of new religious organizations, and challenges the traditional notions of space by Western scientific conceptions in the 19th century. It looks at the synthesis of ritual elements and medical treatment in China and India, and at new funeral practices in Japan. It discusses the intersections between contemporary Western Buddhism, modern technology, and global culture, and goes on to look at women’s rights in contemporary Pakistani media. Using case studies grounded in carefully delineated temporal and regional frameworks, chapters are grouped in two sections; one on religion and science, and another on religion and technology. Illustrating the manifold perspectives and the potential for further research and discussion, this book is an important contribution to the studies of Asian Religion, Science and Technology, and Religion and Philosophy.
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Christianity and Evolution

In this collection of nineteen essays, Teilhard seeks to illuminate a middle ground between science and religion that he felt both disciplines could accept.

Author: Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 9780547543604

Category: Religion

Page: 264

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The author of The Phenomenon of Man reconciles passionate faith with the rigor of scientific thinking. With his unique background as a geologist, paleontologist, and Jesuit priest, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was a powerful exponent of the view that scientific theories could comfortably coexist with religious faith. To this day, his ideas provoke passionate debates in communities that view science and faith as necessarily separate ideologies. In this collection of nineteen essays, Teilhard seeks to illuminate a middle ground between science and religion that he felt both disciplines could accept. He explores the Fall and original sin, the possibility of life on other planets, and the role that God may have played in the process of human evolution, successfully challenging contemporary theologians to rethink their views of the universe and its creation. “Like other great visionary poets—Blake, Hopkins, Yeats—Teilhard engages the reader both intellectually and sensually.” —The Washington Post Book World “An excellent blend of theological speculation with practical or ascetical application.” —Catholic Telegraph
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Identity in a Secular Age

By ascribing agency to the public, from the nineteenth century to the present and across Canada and the United Kingdom, this volume offers a much more nuanced analysis of people’s perceptions about the relationship between evolutionary ...

Author: Fern Elsdon-Baker

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 9780822987697

Category: Science

Page: 276

View: 935

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Although historians have suggested for some time that we move away from the assumption of a necessary clash between science and religion, the conflict narrative persists in contemporary discourse. But why? And how do we really know what people actually think about evolutionary science, let alone the many and varied ways in which it might relate to individual belief? In this multidisciplinary volume, experts in history and philosophy of science, oral history, sociology of religion, social psychology, and science communication and public engagement look beyond two warring systems of thought. They consider a far more complex, multifaceted, and distinctly more interesting picture of how differing groups along a spectrum of worldviews—including atheistic, agnostic, and faith groups—relate to and form the ongoing narrative of a necessary clash between evolution and faith. By ascribing agency to the public, from the nineteenth century to the present and across Canada and the United Kingdom, this volume offers a much more nuanced analysis of people’s perceptions about the relationship between evolutionary science, religion, and personal belief, one that better elucidates the complexities not only of that relationship but of actual lived experience.
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William James and a Science of Religions

An authority on pragmatism and the philosophy of religion, Wayne Proudfoot and a stellar group of contributors from a variety of disciplines including religion, philosophy, psychology, and history, bring innovative perspectives to James's ...

Author: Wayne Proudfoot

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231132046

Category: Religion

Page: 138

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The "science of religion" is an important element in the interpretation of William James's work and in the methodology of the study of religion. An authority on pragmatism and the philosophy of religion, Wayne Proudfoot and a stellar group of contributors from a variety of disciplines including religion, philosophy, psychology, and history, bring innovative perspectives to James's work. Each contributor focuses on a specific theme in The Varieties of Religious Experience and suggests how James's treatment of that theme can fruitfully be brought to bear, sometimes with revisions or extensions, on current debate about religious experience.
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The Territories of Human Reason

This ground-breaking volume sets out to engage these questions and will provoke intense discussion and debate.

Author: Alister E. McGrath

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192542502

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 470

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Our understanding of human rationality has changed significantly since the beginning of the century, with growing emphasis being placed on multiple rationalities, each adapted to the specific tasks of communities of practice. We may think of the world as an ontological unity-but we use a plurality of methods to investigate and represent this world. This development has called into question both the appeal to a universal rationality, characteristic of the Enlightenment, and also the simple 'modern-postmodern' binary. The Territories of Human Reason is the first major study to explore the emergence of multiple situated rationalities. It focuses on the relation of the natural sciences and Christian theology, but its approach can easily be extended to other disciplines. It provides a robust intellectual framework for discussion of transdisciplinarity, which has become a major theme in many parts of the academic world. Alister E. McGrath offers a major reappraisal of what it means to be 'rational' which will have significant impact on older discussions of this theme. He sets out to explore the consequences of the seemingly inexorable move away from the notion of a single universal rationality towards a plurality of cultural and domain-specific methodologies and rationalities. What does this mean for the natural sciences? For the philosophy of science? For Christian theology? And for the interdisciplinary field of science and religion? How can a single individual hold together scientific and religious ideas, when these arise from quite different rational approaches? This groundbreaking volume sets out to engage these questions and will provoke intense discussion and debate.
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