Sexual Harassment in Higher Education

This work reflects on a variety of aspects of sexual harassment, its litigation and law, as well as how the issues they demonstrate often have as much to do with linguistics or jurisprudence as with negative action, though there is a great ...

Author: Billie Wright Dziech

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429824470

Category: Education

Page: 210

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Originally published in 1998, Sexual Harassment in Higher Education addresses the problem of sexual harassment on college campuses. This work reflects on a variety of aspects of sexual harassment, its litigation and law, as well as how the issues they demonstrate often have as much to do with linguistics or jurisprudence as with negative action, though there is a great deal of evidence of the latter. The book provides a clear-eyed and detailed assessment of the 'harassment' controversies now plaguing America's universities and colleges.
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Lad Culture in Higher Education

Responding to increasing concerns about the harmful effects of so-called ‘lad culture’ in British universities, and related ‘bro’ and ‘frat’ cultures in US colleges, this book is the first to explore and analyse the perspectives ...

Author: Carolyn Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351334723

Category: Education

Page: 162

View: 515

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Responding to increasing concerns about the harmful effects of so-called ‘lad culture’ in British universities, and related ‘bro’ and ‘frat’ cultures in US colleges, this book is the first to explore and analyse the perspectives of university staff on these cultures, which students suggest foster the normalisation of sexism, homophobia, racism, sexual harassment and violence. Drawing on in-depth interviews with a broad range of staff and faculty across different types of universities in England, the book explores the following key questions: What is lad culture? How and where is it manifest in higher education and what are the effects on students and staff? How can ‘laddish’ behaviour be explained? How can we theorise lad culture to enable us to better understand and challenge it? How do dynamics in the United Kingdom compare to so-called ‘bro’ and ‘frat’ cultures in US colleges? By examining the ways in which lad culture is understood and explained, the authors illustrate that current understandings of lad culture obscure the broader processes through which problematic attitudes, practices, and educational climates are fostered. This analysis enables a theorisation of lad culture that makes visible the gendered norms and intersecting structural inequalities that underpin it. This timely and accessible volume will be of great interest to anyone looking to understand and tackle sexism, sexual harassment and violence in and beyond university contexts. It will be of particular significance to researchers, undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics, and policy makers in the fields of gender and sexuality in education, higher education, and sociology of education.
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Sexual Harassment and Higher Education

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: Billie Wright Dziech

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138866547

Category: Education

Page:

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First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Sexual Harassment in Higher Education

Presents the legal bases and origins of sexual harassment.

Author: Robert O. Riggs

Publisher: Jossey-Bass

ISBN: 1878380230

Category: Education

Page: 114

View: 279

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Presents the legal bases and origins of sexual harassment. Examines the nature and prevalence of sexually harassing behaviors on campuses and explores institutional responses concerning policies, procedures, and educational programs. Challenges academic communities to move toward an ethic of care, equity, and responsibility.
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Sexual Harassment in Higher Education

In particular, it suggests seemingly prevailing discourses surrounding sexual harassment in higher education and considers if and how the women interviewed define themselves through these discourses.

Author: Helen Clarke

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:861316191

Category:

Page:

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This study focuses upon the relatively unexplored area of sexual harassment in British universities. In sum, the thesis suggests that although MacKinnon's (2004) aim is to enable women to feel more powerful and less stigmatised, the contribution of feminist harassment discourses may, in part, generate in some women an understanding of powerlessness and vulnerability. In particular, it suggests seemingly prevailing discourses surrounding sexual harassment in higher education and considers if and how the women interviewed define themselves through these discourses. Thus, by exploring the power effects of and resistances to these suggested prevailing discourses, it is possible to infer the degree to which these discourses may have constituted the participants' subjectivities. Further, the thesis argues that feminist harassment discourses may have generated specific effects of power with regard to my participants. That is to say, many of my participants seem to understand sexual harassment as exploitative behaviours rooted in the unequal distribution of ascribed power in higher education. Feminism's understanding of power as a static and gendered appears to have generated for the participants, at least in part, the understanding that sex at work is used to humiliate and degrade women, maintaining and reproducing ascribed notions of power. For this research, twenty-four unstructured interviews were carried out with women who had identified themselves as having experienced sexual harassment within higher education, either as a student or a member of staff, or who had witnessed events they had defined as sexual harassment. This was a passionately interested form of inquiry, recognising the partial nature of knowledge and identifying my political positionings (Gill 1995; Aranda 2006). The analysis is Foucauldian oriented, understanding power as fluid - rather than possessed - and as generating particular ways of being. In addition, although it notes that the participants did resists specific effects of power, this resistance always takes place from a new point of power and does not, therefore, carry us beyond power into a power free space. The prevailing discourses suggested from my data are: the 'grades for sex' discourse; the 'all boys together' discourse; the 'trustworthy lecturer' discourse; the 'knickers in a twist' discourse; and the 'sexual harassment as unwanted sexual behaviour' discourse. Supervisors: Dr. Kristin Aune and Dr. Gordon Riches.
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