Sound Recording Technology and American Literature

This book investigates the sustained engagement between American literature and sound recording technologies during the twentieth century.

Author: Jessica Teague

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108840132

Category: Art

Page: 280

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This book investigates the sustained engagement between American literature and sound recording technologies during the twentieth century.
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Sound Recording Technology and American Literature from the Phonograph to the Remix

"When Gertrude Stein published Three Lives, her first book-length work, in 1909, readers were struck by her peculiar, repetitive style.

Author: Jessica Teague

Publisher:

ISBN: 1108879004

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"When Gertrude Stein published Three Lives, her first book-length work, in 1909, readers were struck by her peculiar, repetitive style. As one dust jacket review put it, Stein's prose was like a "stubborn phonograph." Taken in passing, the comparison might seem unremarkable, but in 1909, when the phonograph was still a relatively new technology, the dust jacket remark penned by Georgiana Goddard King (a Reader in English at Bryn Mawr College) reveals how at least one early reader heard Gertrude Stein. According to King, Stein had "pushed the method of realism as far as it would go," and "the patient iteration, the odd style, with all its stops and starts, like a stubborn phonograph, are a part of the incantation. The reader must take it or leave it,-but always, taken or left, it remains astonishing.""
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Sound Recording Technology and American Literature

Studies in Sound Literature has been theorizing sound and its reproduction since ... In a larger sense, Sound Recording Technology and American Literature, ...

Author: Jessica E. Teague

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108881395

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

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Phonographs, tapes, stereo LPs, digital remix - how did these remarkable technologies impact American writing? This book explores how twentieth-century writers shaped the ways we listen in our multimedia present. Uncovering a rich new archive of materials, this book offers a resonant reading of how writers across several genres, such as John Dos Passos, Langston Hughes, William S. Burroughs, and others, navigated the intermedial spaces between texts and recordings. Numerous scholars have taken up remix - a term co-opted from DJs and sound engineers - as the defining aesthetic of twenty-first century art and literature. Others have examined modernism's debt to the phonograph. But in the gap between these moments, one finds that the reciprocal relationship between the literary arts and sonic technologies continued to evolve over the twentieth century. A mix of American literary history, sound studies, and media archaeology, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to scholars, students, and audiophiles.
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Off the Record

A cultural and economic history of sound recording technology.

Author: David Morton

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813527473

Category: Music

Page: 221

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A cultural and economic history of sound recording technology.
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American Lit Remixed

As we will see, Alexie's treatment of sound recording technology in these two works contains both constructive and destructive possibilities.

Author: Melissa J. Strong

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781498594783

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 421

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American Lit Remixed argues that literary texts use music to combat the artifice and alienation of the digital age. Works by well known authors and less familiar ones draw from mixtapes, remixes, vinyl records, and cassettes to reinvent identity and community, as well as literary form.
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Music Sound and Technology in America

This reader collects primary documents on the phonograph, cinema, and radio before WWII to show how Americans slowly came to grips with the idea of recorded and mediated sound.

Author: Timothy D. Taylor

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822349464

Category: Music

Page: 410

View: 469

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This reader collects primary documents on the phonograph, cinema, and radio before WWII to show how Americans slowly came to grips with the idea of recorded and mediated sound. Through readings from advertisements, newspaper and magazine articles, popular fiction, correspondence, and sheet music, one gains an understanding of how early-20th-century Americans changed from music makers into consumers.
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The History of American Literature on Film

... every small town in America with a theater wired for sound reproduction. ... of double-system recording technologies that made it possible to record and ...

Author: Thomas Leitch

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781628923728

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 464

View: 626

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From William Dickson's Rip Van Winkle films (1896) to Baz Luhrmann's big-budget production of The Great Gatsby (2013) and beyond, cinematic adaptations of American literature participate in a rich and fascinating history. Unlike previous studies of American literature and film, which emphasize particular authors like Edith Wharton and Nathaniel Hawthorne, particular texts like Moby-Dick, particular literary periods like the American Renaissance, or particular genres like the novel, this volume considers the multiple functions of filmed American literature as a cinematic genre in its own right-one that reflects the specific political and aesthetic priorities of different national and historical cinemas even as it plays a decisive role in defining American literature for a global audience.
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Sound Recording

Looks at the history of recorded music and technology of the industry from Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1876 to the MP3 players.

Author: David Morton

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801883989

Category: Music

Page: 215

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Looks at the history of recorded music and technology of the industry from Thomas Edison's invention of the phonograph in 1876 to the MP3 players.
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Race Sounds

The Art of Listening in African American Literature Nicole Brittingham ... Invisible Man contemplates the human ear, technologies of sound recording, ...

Author: Nicole Brittingham Furlonge

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 9781609385613

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 206

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Forging new ideas about the relationship between race and sound, Furlonge explores how black artists--including well-known figures such as writers Ralph Ellison and Zora Neale Hurston, and singers Bettye LaVette and Aretha Franklin, among others--imagine listening. Drawing from a multimedia archive, Furlonge examines how many of the texts call on readers to "listen in print." In the process, she gives us a new way to read and interpret these canonical, aurally inflected texts, and demonstrates how listening allows us to engage with the sonic lives of difference as readers, thinkers, and citizens.
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American Studies

An Annotated Bibliography Jack Salzman, American Studies Association ... the recording industry , the technology of sound recording , and the relation of ...

Author: Jack Salzman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521266874

Category: Art

Page: 2058

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A major three-volume bibliography, including an additional supplement, of an annotated listing of American Studies monographs published between 1900 and 1988.
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Always Already New

When Old Technologies Were New : Thinking about Electric Communication in the Late 19th Century . ... America on Record : A History of Recorded Sound .

Author: Lisa Gitelman

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262572477

Category: Social Science

Page: 205

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An analysis of the ways that new media are experienced and studied as the subjects of history, using the examples of early recorded sound and digital networks.
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Realist Ecstasy

Religion, Race, and Performance in American Literature Lindsay V. Reckson ... collapses the technology of sound recording with the very sounds it was meant ...

Author: Lindsay V. Reckson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479868926

Category: Social Science

Page:

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Explores the intersection and history of American literary realism and the performance of spiritual and racial embodiment. Recovering a series of ecstatic performances in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American realism, Realist Ecstasy travels from camp meetings to Native American ghost dances to storefront church revivals to explore realism’s relationship to spiritual experience. In her approach to realism as both an unruly archive of performance and a wide-ranging repertoire of media practices—including literature, photography, audio recording, and early film—Lindsay V. Reckson argues that the real was repetitively enacted and reenacted through bodily practice. Realist Ecstasy demonstrates how the realist imagining of possessed bodies helped construct and naturalize racial difference, while excavating the complex, shifting, and dynamic possibilities embedded in ecstatic performance: its production of new and immanent forms of being beside. Across her readings of Stephen Crane, James Weldon Johnson, and Nella Larsen, among others, Reckson triangulates secularism, realism, and racial formation in the post-Reconstruction moment. Realist Ecstasy shows how post-Reconstruction realist texts mobilized gestures—especially the gestures associated with religious ecstasy—to racialize secularism itself. Reckson offers us a distinctly new vision of American realism as a performative practice, a sustained account of how performance lives in and through literary archives, and a rich sense of how closely secularization and racialization were linked in Jim Crow America.
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The Great American Songbooks

In his history of sound recording technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, for example, Jonathan Sterne emphasizes not how revolutionary but ...

Author: T. Austin Graham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199862115

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 100

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The Great American Songbooks shows how popular music shapes and permeates a host of modernism's hallmark texts. Austin Graham begins his study of 20th-century texts with a discussion of American popular music and literature in the 19th century. He posits Walt Whitman as a proto-modernist who drew on his love of opera to create the epic free-verse poetry that would heavily influence his bardic successors. One can witness this in T. S. Eliot, whose poem The Waste Land relies on Whitman's verse style to emphasize how 19th-century structures of feeling regarding music persist into the 20th century. From opera and standards of the Victorian musical hall, Graham moves to the blues to reveal the multifaceted ways it shaped works in the Harlem Renaissance, most notably in the verse of Langston Hughes and Jean Toomer's stream-of-consciousness masterpiece, Cane. The second half of Songbooks advances an argument for a musical eclecticism that arose alongside rapid industrialization. Writers like Scott Fitzgerald and John Dos Passos, Graham argues, developed a notion of musical eclecticism to help them process—or cope—with the unprecedented invasiveness of popular music, particularly in major cities. This eclecticism runs counter to critics like Adorno who equate popular music with mass produced mechanisms such as the phonograph and radio, and thus with degraded, cultural forms. In conclusion, Graham suggests how modernist writers experienced, and sometimes theorized, a more nuanced, sophisticated, and fluid mode of interaction with popular music.
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Democracy of Sound

David Morton, Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2000), 11.

Author: Alex Sayf Cummings

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190675110

Category:

Page: 274

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It was a time when music fans copied and traded recordings without permission. An outraged music industry pushed Congress to pass anti-piracy legislation. Yes, that time is now; it was also the era of Napster in the 1990s, of cassette tapes in the 1970s, of reel-to-reel tapes in the 1950s, even the phonograph epoch of the 1930s. Piracy, it turns out, is as old as recorded music itself. In Democracy of Sound, Alex Sayf Cummings uncovers the little-known history of music piracy and its sweeping effects on the definition of copyright in the United States. When copyright emerged, only visual material such as books and maps were thought to deserve protection; even musical compositions were not included until 1831. Once a performance could be captured on a wax cylinder or vinyl disc, profound questions arose over the meaning of intellectual property. Is only a written composition defined as a piece of art? If a singer performs a different interpretation of a song, is it a new and distinct work? Such questions have only grown more pressing with the rise of sampling and other forms of musical pastiche. Indeed, music has become the prime battleground between piracy and copyright. It is compact, making it easy to copy. And it is highly social, shared or traded through social networks--often networks that arise around music itself. But such networks also pose a counter-argument: as channels for copying and sharing sounds, they were instrumental in nourishing hip-hop and other new forms of music central to American culture today. Piracy is not always a bad thing. An insightful and often entertaining look at the history of music piracy, Democracy of Sound offers invaluable background to one of the hot-button issues involving creativity and the law.
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The Sonic Color Line

... at the intersection of African American studies and sound studies, ... historiographies of sound that give primacy to recording technologies and ...

Author: Jennifer Lynn Stoever

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479835621

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

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The unheard history of how race and racism are constructed from sound and maintained through the listening ear. Race is a visual phenomenon, the ability to see “difference.” At least that is what conventional wisdom has lead us to believe. Yet, The Sonic Color Line argues that American ideologies of white supremacy are just as dependent on what we hear—voices, musical taste, volume—as they are on skin color or hair texture. Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. Through analysis of the historical traces of sounds of African American performers, Stoever reveals a host of racialized aural representations operating at the level of the unseen—the sonic color line—and exposes the racialized listening practices she figures as “the listening ear.” Using an innovative multimedia archive spanning 100 years of American history (1845-1945) and several artistic genres—the slave narrative, opera, the novel, so-called “dialect stories,” folk and blues, early sound cinema, and radio drama—The Sonic Color Line explores how black thinkers conceived the cultural politics of listening at work during slavery, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow. By amplifying Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, Charles Chesnutt, The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Ann Petry, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Lena Horne as agents and theorists of sound, Stoever provides a new perspective on key canonical works in African American literary history. In the process, she radically revises the established historiography of sound studies. The Sonic Color Line sounds out how Americans have created, heard, and resisted “race,” so that we may hear our contemporary world differently.
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Write in Tune Contemporary Music in Fiction

... and is bound up with sound-recording technologies that permit the creation of ... ed., Black Orpheus: Music in African American Fiction from the Harlem ...

Author: Erich Hertz

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781623565060

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

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Contemporary popular music provides the soundtrack for a host of recent novels, but little critical attention has been paid to the intersection of these important art forms. Write in Tune addresses this gap by offering the first full-length study of the relationship between recent music and fiction. With essays from an array of international scholars, the collection focuses on how writers weave rock, punk, and jazz into their narratives, both to develop characters and themes and to investigate various fan and celebrity cultures surrounding contemporary music. Write in Tune covers major writers from America and England, including Don DeLillo, Jonathan Franzen, Zadie Smith, and Jim Crace. But it also explores how popular music culture is reflected in postcolonial, Latino, and Australian fiction. Ultimately, the book brings critical awareness to the power of music in shaping contemporary culture, and offers new perspectives on central issues of gender, race, and national identity.
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Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors

1966 GC : 410 Sound Transmission USE ACOUSTICS Sound Waves USE ACOUSTICS SOIL ... South American Literature USE LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE - South Americans ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015020724954

Category: Subject headings

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Imagine the Sound

Experimental African American Literature after Civil Rights Carter Mathes ... his process of imagining sound, Brown frames recording technology and the ...

Author: Carter Mathes

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452942926

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

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The post–Civil Rights era was marked by an explosion of black political thought and aesthetics. Reflecting a shifting horizon of expectations around race relations, the unconventional sounds of free jazz coupled with experimental literary creation nuanced the push toward racial equality and enriched the possibilities for aesthetic innovation within the Black Arts Movement. In Imagine the Sound, Carter Mathes demonstrates how African American writers used sound to further artistic resistance within a rapidly transforming political and racial landscape. While many have noted the oral and musical qualities of African American poetry from the post–Civil Rights period, Mathes points out how the political implications of dissonance, vibration, and resonance produced in essays, short stories, and novels animated the ongoing struggle for equality. Situating literary works by Henry Dumas, Larry Neal, and Toni Cade Bambara in relation to the expansive ideas of sound proposed by free jazz musicians such as Marion Brown and Sun Ra, not only does this book illustrate how the presence of sound can be heard and read as political, but it recuperates critically neglected, yet important, writers and musicians. Ultimately, Mathes details how attempts to capture and render sound through the medium of writing enable writers to envision alternate realities and resistance outside of the linear frameworks offered by the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. In precise and elegant prose, Mathes shows how in conceptualizing sound, African American writers opened up the political imaginations of their readers. By exploring this intellectual convergence of literary artistry, experimental music, and sound theory, Imagine the Sound reveals how taking up radically new forms of expression allows us to speak to the complexities of race and political resistance.
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Keywords in Sound

Music and Sound Interest Group in the American Anthropological Association in 2009. ... recording studios, for example, has shown how technologies of sound ...

Author: David Novak

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822375494

Category: Music

Page: 272

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In twenty essays on subjects such as noise, acoustics, music, and silence, Keywords in Sound presents a definitive resource for sound studies, and a compelling argument for why studying sound matters. Each contributor details their keyword's intellectual history, outlines its role in cultural, social and political discourses, and suggests possibilities for further research. Keywords in Sound charts the philosophical debates and core problems in defining, classifying and conceptualizing sound, and sets new challenges for the development of sound studies. Contributors. Andrew Eisenberg, Veit Erlmann, Patrick Feaster, Steven Feld, Daniel Fisher, Stefan Helmreich, Charles Hirschkind, Deborah Kapchan, Mara Mills, John Mowitt, David Novak, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier, Thomas Porcello, Tom Rice, Tara Rodgers, Matt Sakakeeny, David Samuels, Mark M. Smith, Benjamin Steege, Jonathan Sterne, Amanda Weidman
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