Texts and Identities in the Early Middle Ages

They analyse differences between similar texts over time, or, specifically, changes in texts in the course of their transmission. The papers collected in this volume illustrate that texts were integral parts of a world in transformation.

Author: Richard Corradini

Publisher: Austrian Academy of Sciences

ISBN: STANFORD:36105122919975

Category: History

Page: 460

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For seven years, a collaboration between the Institute for Medieval Studies of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Universities of Utrecht, Cambridge, Leeds and Paris I, Sorbonne provided the opportunity for young researchers to discuss and coordinate their work. The title of the project and of this volume, Texts and identities, provides the framework for case studies in different fields of early medieval history. They include apparently disparate topics such as historiography and hagiography, monastic spaces and memories, lay and ecclesiastic legislation, as well as liturgy and penance. Rather than defining a common field of research, the meetings from which these papers have emerged derived their coherence from their common methodological framework. This approach combines two elements: on the one hand, emphasis has been laid on the careful analysis of the transmission of texts and of the manuscript evidence; on the other, research has focused on the problem of identity, or rather, of processes of identification, including the perception of differences between specific social, political and religious communities. In the combination of these two approaches the extant texts from the early medieval period are not only seen as mere reflections of ethnic, social and cultural identities, but also as media that gave meaning to social practices and were often intended to inspire, guide, change or prevent action, directly or indirectly. The written texts that have been transmitted to us can be seen as part of a cultural effort to shape the present by means of restructuring the past. The often discordant voices of medieval authors allow modern historians to grasp something of the multiplicity of the early medieval world, and of the disagreements, conflicts, idiosyncrasies and individual perceptions among the people who lived in that period. Many contributions in this volume propose specific methods for studying changing identities. They analyse differences between similar texts over time, or, specifically, changes in texts in the course of their transmission. The papers collected in this volume illustrate that texts were integral parts of a world in transformation.
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Texts and Identities in the Early Middle Ages

They analyse differences between similar texts over time, or, specifically, changes in texts in the course of their transmission. The papers collected in this volume illustrate that texts were integral parts of a world in transformation.

Author: Richard Corradini

Publisher: Austrian Academy of Sciences

ISBN: 3700137478

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 384

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For seven years, a collaboration between the Institute for Medieval Studies of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Universities of Utrecht, Cambridge, Leeds and Paris I, Sorbonne provided the opportunity for young researchers to discuss and coordinate their work. The title of the project and of this volume, Texts and identities, provides the framework for case studies in different fields of early medieval history. They include apparently disparate topics such as historiography and hagiography, monastic spaces and memories, lay and ecclesiastic legislation, as well as liturgy and penance. Rather than defining a common field of research, the meetings from which these papers have emerged derived their coherence from their common methodological framework. This approach combines two elements: on the one hand, emphasis has been laid on the careful analysis of the transmission of texts and of the manuscript evidence; on the other, research has focused on the problem of identity, or rather, of processes of identification, including the perception of differences between specific social, political and religious communities. In the combination of these two approaches the extant texts from the early medieval period are not only seen as mere reflections of ethnic, social and cultural identities, but also as media that gave meaning to social practices and were often intended to inspire, guide, change or prevent action, directly or indirectly. The written texts that have been transmitted to us can be seen as part of a cultural effort to shape the present by means of restructuring the past. The often discordant voices of medieval authors allow modern historians to grasp something of the multiplicity of the early medieval world, and of the disagreements, conflicts, idiosyncrasies and individual perceptions among the people who lived in that period. Many contributions in this volume propose specific methods for studying changing identities. They analyse differences between similar texts over time, or, specifically, changes in texts in the course of their transmission. The papers collected in this volume illustrate that texts were integral parts of a world in transformation.
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The Construction of Communities in the Early Middle Ages

This volume provides a complex discussion of the variety of social efforts which were undertaken to create meaningful communities in the process of the formation of the early medieval gentes and kingdoms in the post-Roman west.

Author: Richard Corradini

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004118621

Category: History

Page: 417

View: 552

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This volume provides a complex discussion of the variety of social efforts which were undertaken to create meaningful communities in the process of the formation of the early medieval gentes and kingdoms in the post-Roman west.
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History Frankish Identity and the Framing of Western Ethnicity 550 850

Interpreting identity as an open-ended process, Helmut Reimitz explores the role of Frankish identity in the multiple efforts through which societies tried to find order in the rapidly changing post-Roman world.

Author: Helmut Reimitz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107032330

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 947

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This pioneering study explores early medieval Frankish identity as a window into the formation of a distinct Western conception of ethnicity. Focusing on the turbulent and varied history of Frankish identity in Merovingian and Carolingian historiography, it offers a new basis for comparing the history of collective and ethnic identity in the Christian West with other contexts, especially the Islamic and Byzantine worlds. The tremendous political success of the Frankish kingdoms provided the medieval West with fundamental political, religious and social structures, including a change from the Roman perspective on ethnicity as the quality of the 'Other' to the Carolingian perception that a variety of Christian peoples were chosen by God to reign over the former Roman provinces. Interpreting identity as an open ended process, Helmut Reimitz explores the role of Frankish identity in the multiple efforts through which societies tried to find order in the rapidly changing post-Roman world.
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Food Eating and Identity in Early Medieval England

A fresh approach to the implications of obtaining, preparing, and consuming food, concentrating on the little-investigated routines of everyday life.

Author: Allen J. Frantzen

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 9781843839088

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 732

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A fresh approach to the implications of obtaining, preparing, and consuming food, concentrating on the little-investigated routines of everyday life.
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The Resources of the Past in Early Medieval Europe

Particular texts compiled in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages not only
reflect social and cultural identities but can also be understood as part of an effort
to shape the present by means of restructuring the past. Not the least influential of
 ...

Author: Clemens Gantner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107091719

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 514

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Examines the use of the textual resources of the past to shape cultural memory in early medieval Europe.
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The Uses of the Past in the Early Middle Ages

This is the first book to investigate how people in the early middle ages used the past: to legitimate the present, to understand current events, and as a source of identity.

Author: Yitzhak Hen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521639980

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 609

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This is the first book to investigate how people in the early middle ages used the past: to legitimate the present, to understand current events, and as a source of identity. Each essay examines the mechanisms by which ideas about the past were - sometimes - subtly reshaped for present purposes.
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The Irish in Early Medieval Europe

This edited collection of brand new essays brings together some of the world's leading experts in the field who synthesise major critical developments, and offer exciting new perspectives on the Irish peregrini.

Author: Roy Flechner

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137430618

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 398

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Many Irish scholars, known as 'peregrini', arrived in Continental Europe in the early Middle Ages making a significant cultural impact. This edited collection of brand new essays brings together some of the world's leading experts in the field who synthesise major critical developments, and offer exciting new perspectives on the Irish peregrini.
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On Barbarian Identity

The papers in this volume challenge the concepts and methodologies of these two models.

Author: INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDI

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: UOM:39015057016167

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 581

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Ethnicity has been central to medieval studies since the Goths, Franks, Alamanni and other barbarian settlers of the Roman empire were first seen as part of Germanic antiquity. Today, two paradigms dominate interpretation of barbarian Europe. In history, theories of how tribes formed ('ethnogenesis') assert the continuity of Germanic identities from prehistory through the Middle Ages, and see cultural rather than biological factors as the means of preserving these identities. In archaeology, the 'culture history' approach has long claimed to be able to trace movements of peoples not attested in the historical record, by identifying ethnically-specific material goods. The papers in this volume challenge the concepts and methodologies of these two models. The authors explore new ways to understand barbarians in the early Middle Ages, and to analyse the images of the period constructed by modern scholarship. Two responses, one by a leading exponent of the 'ethnogenesis' approach, the other by a leading critic, continue this important debate.
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The Medieval Way of War

Studies in Medieval Military History in Honor of Bernard S. Bachrach Gregory I.
Halfond ... Practice of Sanctuary in the Merovingian period,” in Texts & Identities
in the Early Middle Ages, (eds) Richard Corradini, Rob Meens, Christina Pössel ...

Author: Gregory I. Halfond

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781472419606

Category: History

Page: 348

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Few historians have argued so forcefully or persuasively as Bernard S. Bachrach for the study of warfare as not only worthy of scholarly attention, but demanding of it. In his many publications Bachrach has established unequivocally the relevance of military institutions and activity for an understanding of medieval European societies, polities, and mentalities. In so doing, as much as any scholar of his generation, he has helped to define the status quaestionis for the field of medieval military history. The Medieval Way of War: Studies in Medieval Military History in Honor of Bernard S. Bachrach pays tribute to its honoree by gathering in a single volume seventeen original studies from an international roster of leading experts in the military history of medieval Europe. Ranging chronologically from Late Antiquity through the Later Middle Ages (ca. AD 300-1500), and with a broad geographical scope stretching from the British Isles to the Middle East, these diverse studies address an array of critical themes and debates relevant to the conduct of war in medieval Europe. These themes include the formation and implementation of military grand strategies; the fiscal, material, and administrative resources that underpinned the conduct of war in medieval Europe; and religious, legal, and artistic responses to military violence. Collectively, these seventeen studies embrace the interdisciplinarity and topical diversity intrinsic to Bachrach’s research. Additionally, they strongly echo his conviction that the study of armed conflict is indispensable for an accurate and comprehensive understanding of medieval European history.
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Saxon Identities AD 150 900

This book traces this process of identity-formation over the course of eight centuries, from its earliest beginnings in Roman ethnography to its reinvention in the monasteries and bishoprics of ninth-century Saxony.

Author: Robert Flierman

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350019478

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 985

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This study is the first up-to-date comprehensive analysis of Continental Saxon identity in antiquity and the early middle ages. Building on recent scholarship on barbarian ethnicity, this study emphasises not just the constructed and open-ended nature of Saxon identity, but also the crucial role played by texts as instruments and resources of identity-formation. This book traces this process of identity-formation over the course of eight centuries, from its earliest beginnings in Roman ethnography to its reinvention in the monasteries and bishoprics of ninth-century Saxony. Though the Saxons were mentioned as early as AD 150, they left no written evidence of their own before c. 840. Thus, for the first seven centuries, we can only look at the Saxons through the eyes of their Roman enemies, Merovingian neighbours and Carolingian conquerors. Such external perspectives do not yield objective descriptions of a people, but rather reflect an ongoing discourse on Saxon identity, in which outside authors described who they imagined, wanted or feared the Saxons to be: dangerous pirates, noble savages, bestial pagans or faithful subjects. Significantly, these outside views deeply influenced how ninth-century Saxons eventually came to think about themselves, using Roman and Frankish texts to reinvent the Saxons as a noble and Christian people.
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Perceptions of the Past in the Early Middle Ages

In these essays, McKitterick focuses on the Frankish realms in the eighth and ninth centuries and examines different methods and genres of historical writing in relation to the perceptions of time and chronology.

Author: Rosamond McKitterick

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066815831

Category: History

Page: 154

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“What McKitterick calls the 'explosion of historical writing' in the Carolingian age marked the dawn of a radically new and lasting culture in Europe and disclosed the mind-sets of its creators. Yet, in many cases, published editions deform the texts, not least by omissions, and obscure what Frankish authors actually wrote. Building on her internationally acclaimed studies of oral and written communication in the early Middle Ages, McKitterick goes back to manuscript sources. As she advances a compelling new key to the catalysts of Europe's historical identity, she discovers what Carolingians actually wrote and how they did their work.” —Karl F. Morrison, Lessing Professor of History and Poetics, Rutgers University “As perceptive as it is learned, Rosamond McKitterick's book unpicks the complex web of Frankish perceptions of the past. . . . McKitterick deftly transforms texts that previous scholars have usually dismissed into clues from which she draws cogent arguments. This study of historical imaginations in the past is itself a model of imaginative history.” —Anthony Grafton, Princeton University Historical writing of the early middle ages tends to be regarded as little more than a possible source of facts, but Rosamond McKitterick establishes that early medieval historians conveyed in their texts a sophisticated set of multiple perceptions of the past. In these essays, McKitterick focuses on the Frankish realms in the eighth and ninth centuries and examines different methods and genres of historical writing in relation to the perceptions of time and chronology. She claims that there is an extraordinary concentration of new text production and older text reproduction in this period that has to be accounted for, and whose influence is still being investigated and established. Three themes are addressed in Perceptions of the Past in the Early Middle Ages. McKitterick begins by discussing the Chronicon of Eusebius-Jerome as a way of examining the composition and reception of universal history in the ninth and early tenth centuries. She demonstrates that original manuscripts turn out in many cases to be compilations of sequential historical texts with a chronology extending back to the creation of the world or the origin of the Franks. In the second chapter, she explores the significance of Rome in Carolingian perceptions of the past and argues that its importance loomed large and was communicated in a great range of texts and material objects. In the third chapter, she looks at eighth- and ninth-century perceptions of the local past in the Frankish realm within the wider contexts of Christian and national history. She concludes that in the very rich, complex, and sometimes contradictory early medieval perceptions of a past stretching back to the creation of the world, the Franks in the Carolingian period forged their own special place.
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Penance in Medieval Europe 600 1200

An up-to-date overview of the functions and contexts of penance in medieval Europe, revealing the latest research and interpretations.

Author: Rob Meens

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521872126

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 520

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An up-to-date overview of the functions and contexts of penance in medieval Europe, revealing the latest research and interpretations.
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Text and Territory

Exploring medieval texts as diverse as Icelandic sagas, Ptolemy's Geography, and Mandeville's Travels, the contributors illustrate the intimate connection between geographical conceptions and the mastery of land, the assertion of doctrine, ...

Author: Sylvia Tomasch

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812216350

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 330

View: 346

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Exploring medieval texts as diverse as Icelandic sagas, Ptolemy's Geography, and Mandeville's Travels, the contributors illustrate the intimate connection between geographical conceptions and the mastery of land, the assertion of doctrine, and the performance of sexuality.
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Ethnicity and Self identity

Anger's Past thus offers a unique contribution to the study of medieval cultures.
Chapters address the expression and representation of anger in a wide variety of
texts from the early to late Middle Ages, and they demonstrate a consistent ...

Author: Paul Maurice Clogan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0742513033

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 152

View: 699

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Medievalia et Humanistica, No. 28 contains five original articles exploring topics ranging from medieval ethnicity and self-identity to little-known documents in fifteenth century Italy. In addition to the articles, fourteen review notices examine recent publications in medieval and early modern studies.
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Identity and Insurgency in the Late Middle Ages

The most crucial issues in current research are debated in the latest volume in the series.

Author: Linda Clark

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 1843832704

Category: History

Page: 203

View: 364

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The most crucial issues in current research are debated in the latest volume in the series.
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Framing the Early Middle Ages

This book takes all different developments as typical, and aims to construct a synthesis based on a better understanding of difference and the reasons for it.

Author: Chris Wickham

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191622632

Category: History

Page: 1024

View: 294

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The Roman empire tends to be seen as a whole whereas the early middle ages tends to be seen as a collection of regional histories, roughly corresponding to the land-areas of modern nation states. As a result, early medieval history is much more fragmented, and there have been few convincing syntheses of socio-economic change in the post-Roman world since the 1930s. In recent decades, the rise of early medieval archaeology has also transformed our source-base, but this has not been adequately integrated into analyses of documentary history in almost any country. In Framing the Early Middle Ages Chris Wickham combines documentary and archaeological evidence to create a comparative history of the period 400-800. His analysis embraces each of the regions of the late Roman and immediately post-Roman world, from Denmark to Egypt. The book concentrates on classic socio-economic themes, state finance, the wealth and identity of the aristocracy, estate management, peasant society, rural settlement, cities, and exchange. These give only a partial picture of the period, but they frame and explain other developments. Earlier syntheses have taken the development of a single region as 'typical', with divergent developments presented as exceptions. This book takes all different developments as typical, and aims to construct a synthesis based on a better understanding of difference and the reasons for it.
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Law and Authority in the Early Middle Ages

Thomas Faulkner tackles these questions more systematically than ever before, proposing new understandings of the relationship between the making of law and royal power, and the reading of law and the maintenance of ethnic identities.

Author: Thomas Faulkner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316483282

Category: History

Page:

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The barbarian law codes, compiled between the sixth and eighth centuries, were copied remarkably frequently in the Carolingian ninth century. They provide crucial evidence for early medieval society, including the settlement of disputes, the nature of political authority, literacy, and the construction of ethnic identities. Yet it has proved extremely difficult to establish why the codes were copied in the ninth century, how they were read, and how their rich evidence should be used. Thomas Faulkner tackles these questions more systematically than ever before, proposing new understandings of the relationship between the making of law and royal power, and the reading of law and the maintenance of ethnic identities. Faulkner suggests major reinterpretations of central texts, including the Carolingian law codes, the capitularies adding to the laws, and Carolingian revisions of earlier barbarian and Roman laws. He also provides detailed analysis of legal manuscripts, especially those associated with the leges-scriptorium.
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C li D in Ireland

A detailed investigation into the mysterious group of monks, the Céli Dé, who flourished in early medieval Ireland.

Author: Westley Follett

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1843832763

Category: Religion

Page: 253

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A detailed investigation into the mysterious group of monks, the Céli Dé, who flourished in early medieval Ireland.
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