The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory

The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory addresses one of the most debated and least understood revolutions in the history of our species, the change from hunting and gathering to farming.

Author: Graeme Barker

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191557668

Category: Social Science

Page: 616

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The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory addresses one of the most debated and least understood revolutions in the history of our species, the change from hunting and gathering to farming. Graeme Barker takes a global view, and integrates a massive array of information from archaeology and many other disciplines, including anthropology, botany, climatology, genetics, linguistics, and zoology. Against current orthodoxy, Barker develops a strong case for the development of agricultural systems in many areas as transformations in the life-ways of the indigenous forager societies, and argues that these were as much changes in social norms and ideologies as in ways of obtaining food. With a large number of helpful line drawings and photographs as well as a comprehensive bibliography, this authoritative study will appeal to a wide general readership as well as to specialists in a variety of fields.
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The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory

This book addresses one of the most debated and least understood revolutions in the history of our species, the change from foraging (hunting and gathering) to farming.

Author: Graeme Barker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199281091

Category: History

Page: 598

View: 683

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This book addresses one of the most debated and least understood revolutions in the history of our species, the change from foraging (hunting and gathering) to farming. Ten thousand years ago there were few if any communities whom we can properly call farmers; five thousand years later, large numbers of the world's population were farmers, using a wide variety of crops and animals in different combinations in different regions. The possible reasons for the transition have long been one of the most controversial topics in archaeology, and continue to be so. The author integrates a massive array of information from archaeology (including archaeological approaches right across the humanities and science spectrum), together with many other disciplines including anthropology, botany, climatology, genetics, linguistics, and zoology. Against current orthodoxy, he develops a strong case for the parallel development of geographically specific agricultural systems in many areas of the world, transformations in the lifeways of forager societies that in some cases have origins reaching much further back in time that commonly suggested. He argues that the change from foraging to farming was as much about foragers developing new ways of thinking about their relationship to the world they inhabited as about new ways of obtaining food.
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The Cambridge World History Volume 2 A World with Agriculture 12 000 BCE 500 CE

To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE-500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods.

Author: Graeme Barker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108407641

Category: History

Page: 662

View: 727

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The development of agriculture has often been described as the most important change in all of human history. Volume 2 of the Cambridge World History series explores the origins and impact of agriculture and agricultural communities, and also discusses issues associated with pastoralism and hunter-fisher-gatherer economies. To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE-500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods. Scholars from a range of disciplines, including archaeology, historical linguistics, biology, anthropology, and history, trace common developments in the more complex social structures and cultural forms that agriculture enabled, such as sedentary villages and more elaborate foodways, and then present a series of regional overviews accompanied by detailed case studies from many different parts of the world, including Southwest Asia, South Asia, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, and Europe.
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The Cambridge World History

To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE-500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods.

Author: Graeme Barker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521192188

Category: History

Page: 668

View: 726

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The development of agriculture has often been described as the most important change in all of human history. Volume 2 of the Cambridge World History series explores the origins and impact of agriculture and agricultural communities, and also discusses issues associated with pastoralism and hunter-fisher-gatherer economies. To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE-500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods. Scholars from a range of disciplines, including archaeology, historical linguistics, biology, anthropology, and history, trace common developments in the more complex social structures and cultural forms that agriculture enabled, such as sedentary villages and more elaborate foodways, and then present a series of regional overviews accompanied by detailed case studies from many different parts of the world, including Southwest Asia, South Asia, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, and Europe.
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The Wetland Revolution in Prehistory

Pfahlbauten - Moorsiedlung.

Author: Prehistoric Society (London, England)

Publisher: Warp

ISBN: UOM:39015028926502

Category: Antiquities, Prehistoric

Page: 153

View: 102

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Pfahlbauten - Moorsiedlung.
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The Cambridge World History Volume 2 A World with Agriculture 12 000 BCE 500 CE

To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE–500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods.

Author: Graeme Barker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316297780

Category: History

Page:

View: 204

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The development of agriculture has often been described as the most important change in all of human history. Volume 2 of the Cambridge World History series explores the origins and impact of agriculture and agricultural communities, and also discusses issues associated with pastoralism and hunter-fisher-gatherer economies. To capture the patterns of this key change across the globe, the volume uses an expanded timeframe from 12,000 BCE–500 CE, beginning with the Neolithic and continuing into later periods. Scholars from a range of disciplines, including archaeology, historical linguistics, biology, anthropology, and history, trace common developments in the more complex social structures and cultural forms that agriculture enabled, such as sedentary villages and more elaborate foodways, and then present a series of regional overviews accompanied by detailed case studies from many different parts of the world, including Southwest Asia, South Asia, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas, and Europe.
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History of the World

The world history defines the history of mankind as decided by the study of archaeological and inscribed archives.

Author: Introbooks

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 197403075X

Category:

Page: 32

View: 590

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The world history defines the history of mankind as decided by the study of archaeological and inscribed archives. The recorded ancient history starts when writing was invented. Prehistory is marked by the Early Stone Age or the Palaeolithic Era which was followed by New Stone Age or Neolithic Era. The Agricultural Revolution was from 8000 and 5000 BCE; it was during this time that the humans progressed and started farming and animal husbandry and settled down to form villages and then civilizations. Expansion of these villages required one to travel and travelling from one place to the other lead to development of transport.
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ORIGINS SPREAD AGRIC PAST PB

"The transitions from hunting and gathering to agriculture had revolutionary consequences for human society, leading to the emergence of urban civilizations, and ultimately, to humanity's dependence on relatively few domesticated animals ...

Author: HARRIS DAVID R

Publisher: Smithsonian

ISBN: 1560986751

Category: Agriculture

Page: 594

View: 471

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"The transitions from hunting and gathering to agriculture had revolutionary consequences for human society, leading to the emergence of urban civilizations, and ultimately, to humanity's dependence on relatively few domesticated animals and plants. Though the subject has been studied extensively, results have typically been interpreted in terms of local cultural sequences. By contrast, The Origins and Spread of Agriculture and Pastoralism in Eurasia provides a continental-scale framework for examining the agricultural "revolution" from its inception nearly 10,000 years ago."--Back cover.
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The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia

Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced ...

Author: C.F.W. Higham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199355365

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 560

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Southeast Asia ranks among the most significant regions in the world for tracing the prehistory of human endeavor over a period in excess of two million years. It lies in the direct path of successive migrations from the African homeland that saw settlement by hominin populations such as Homo erectus and Homo floresiensis. The first Anatomically Modern Humans, following a coastal route, reached the region at least 60,000 years ago to establish a hunter gatherer tradition that survives to this day in remote forests. From about 2000 BC, human settlement of Southeast Asia was deeply affected by successive innovations that took place to the north and west, such as rice and millet farming. A millennium later, knowledge of bronze casting penetrated along the same pathways. Copper mines were identified and exploited, and metals were exchanged over hundreds of kilometers. In the Mekong Delta and elsewhere, these developments led to early states of the region, which benefitted from an agricultural revolution involving permanent ploughed rice fields. These developments illuminate how the great early kingdoms of Angkor, Champa, and Funan came to be, a vital stage in understanding the roots of the present nation states of Southeast Asia. Assembling the most current research across a variety of disciplines--from anthropology and archaeology to history, art history, and linguistics--The Oxford Handbook of Early Southeast Asia will present an invaluable resource to experienced researchers and those approaching the topic for the first time.
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