The Alcoholic Republic

Rorabaugh has written a well thought out and intriguing social history of Americas great alcoholic binge that occurred between 1790 and 1830, what he terms a key formative period in our history.

Author: W.J. Rorabaugh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199766312

Category: History

Page: 320

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Rorabaugh has written a well thought out and intriguing social history of Americas great alcoholic binge that occurred between 1790 and 1830, what he terms a key formative period in our history....A pioneering work that illuminates a part of our heritage that can no longer be neglected in future studies of Americas social fabric. A bold and frequently illuminating attempt to investigate the relationship of a single social custom to the central features of our historical experience....A book which always asks interesting questions and provides many provocative answers.
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Prohibition a Very Short Introduction

This book answers these questions, presenting a brief and elegant overview of the Prohibition era and its legacy. During the 1920s alcohol prices rose, quality declined, and consumption dropped.

Author: W. J. Rorabaugh

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190280109

Category:

Page: 152

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Americans have always been a hard-drinking people, but from 1920 to 1933 the country went dry. After decades of pressure from rural Protestants such as the hatchet-wielding Carry A. Nation and organizations such as the Women's Christian Temperance Union and Anti-Saloon League, the states ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution. Bolstered by the Volstead Act, this amendment made Prohibition law: alcohol could no longer be produced, imported, transported, or sold. This bizarre episode is often humorously recalled, frequently satirized, and usually condemned. The more interesting questions, however, are how and why Prohibition came about, how Prohibition worked (and failed to work), and how Prohibition gave way to strict governmental regulation of alcohol. This book answers these questions, presenting a brief and elegant overview of the Prohibition era and its legacy. During the 1920s alcohol prices rose, quality declined, and consumption dropped. The black market thrived, filling the pockets of mobsters and bootleggers. Since beer was too bulky to hide and largely disappeared, drinkers sipped cocktails made with moonshine or poor-grade imported liquor. The all-male saloon gave way to the speakeasy, where together men and women drank, smoked, and danced to jazz. After the onset of the Great Depression, support for Prohibition collapsed because of the rise in gangster violence and the need for revenue at local, state, and federal levels. As public opinion turned, Franklin Delano Roosevelt promised to repeal Prohibition in 1932. The legalization of beer came in April 1933, followed by the Twenty-first Amendment's repeal of the Eighteenth that December. State alcohol control boards soon adopted strong regulations, and their legacies continue to influence American drinking habits. Soon after, Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith founded Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). The alcohol problem had shifted from being a moral issue during the century to a social, cultural, and political one during the campaign for Prohibition, and finally, to a therapeutic one involving individuals. As drinking returned to pre-Prohibition levels, a Neo-Prohibition emerged, led by groups such as Mothers against Drunk Driving, and ultimately resulted in a higher legal drinking age and other legislative measures. With his unparalleled expertise regarding American drinking patterns, W. J. Rorabaugh provides an accessible synthesis of one of the most important topics in US history, a topic that remains relevant today amidst rising concerns over binge-drinking and alcohol culture on college campuses.
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Prohibition

A short and engaging synthesis of Prohibition that illuminates its deep impact on American history, culture, and law from the 1920s to the present .(source éditeur).

Author: W. J. Rorabaugh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190689933

Category: HISTORY

Page: 133

View: 174

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A short and engaging synthesis of Prohibition that illuminates its deep impact on American history, culture, and law from the 1920s to the present .(source éditeur).
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White Man s Wicked Water

"Unrau draws upon an impressive array of Indian petitions, official reports, court records, and treaties to show how the West was really won.

Author: William E. Unrau

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89060701505

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 499

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"Unrau draws upon an impressive array of Indian petitions, official reports, court records, and treaties to show how the West was really won. This detailed chronicle offers abundant evidence that alcohol both encouraged white conquest and destroyed native Americans". -- W. J. Rorabaugh, author of The Alcoholic Republic. "An excellent analysis. Unrau explores and documents the problems associated with one of the darker sides of acculturation or accommodation". -- R. David Edmonds, author of The Shawnee Prophet.
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Prohibition

In this accessible introduction, W.J. Rorabaugh, the leading historian of American drinking patterns, explains how and why Prohibition came about, how it worked (and failed to work), and how it gave way to strict governmental regulation of ...

Author: W. J. Rorabaugh

Publisher:

ISBN: 0190280131

Category: Prohibition

Page:

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From 1920 to 1933 Americans were generally barred from making, transporting, or selling alcoholic beverages. While this attempt to impose prohibition did not last long, drinking habits did change dramatically. In this accessible introduction, W.J. Rorabaugh, the leading historian of American drinking patterns, explains how and why Prohibition came about, how it worked (and failed to work), and how it gave way to strict governmental regulation of alcohol.
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Berkeley at War The 1960s

An invaluable account of its time and place, this book anchors the '60s in American history, both before and since that colorful decade.

Author: W.J. Rorabaugh Professor of History University of Washington

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198022527

Category: History

Page: 328

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Berkeley, California, was the bellwether of the political, social, and cultural upheaval that made the 1960s a unique period of American history--a time when the top-down methods of a conservative establishment collided head-on with the bottom-up, grass-roots ethos of the civil rights movement and an increasingly well-educated and individualistic middle class. W.J. Rorabaugh, who attended the graduate school of the University of California at Berkeley in the early 1970s, presents a lively and informative account of the events that overtook and changed forever what had once been a quiet, conservative white suburb. The rise of the Free Speech Movement, which gave a voice to disfranchised students; the growth and increasing militance of a black community struggling to end segregation; the emergence of radicalism and the anti-war movement; the blossoming of "hippie" culture, with its scorn for materialism and enthusiasm for experimentation with everything from sex and drugs to Eastern philosophies; the beginnings of modern-day feminism and environmentalism--and how all of these coalesced in the explosive conflict over People's Park--are traced in a meticulously researched and authoritative narrative. At issue was the question of power, and the struggle between the establishment and the powerless led to developments that the advocates of a freer society could scarcely have foreseen: Ronald Reagan, elected governor of California in reaction to the events at Berkeley, and Edwin H. Meese III, who battled against the student movement and People's Park, rose to national power in the 1980s (without, however, gaining any popularity in Berkeley, where Walter Mondale won 83 percent of the vote in 1984). An invaluable account of its time and place, this book anchors the '60s in American history, both before and since that colorful decade.
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American Hippies

This short overview of the United States hippie social movement examines hippie beliefs and practices.

Author: W. J. Rorabaugh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107049239

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 990

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This short overview of the United States hippie social movement examines hippie beliefs and practices.
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The American Experience with Alcohol

In M. Marshall (Ed.), Through a glass darkly: Beer and modernization in Papua New Guinea. Boroko Papua, New Guinea: Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research, 1982. Rorabaugh, W. J. The alcoholic republic: An American tradition.

Author: G.M. Ames

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781489905307

Category: Social Science

Page: 490

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This volume is an important contribution to our understanding of culture and alcohol in the United States. Its appearance is also a milestone in the history of alcohol studies in American anthropology. Over the last six years, the volume's editors, initially along with Miriam Rodin, have served as the coorganizers of the Alcohol and Drug Study Group of the American Anthropological Association (AAA). In this capacity, they have organized sessions at the AAA and other meetings, greatly strengthened the research network with a regular and informative newsletter, and painstakingly promoted the publication of anthropological work on al cohol and drugs. Appearing just as the responsibility for the Study Group is passed on to others, this book is a fitting emblem of the care and energy with which its editors have built an institutional nexus for alcohol and drug anthropology in North America. The contents of this volume offer a uniquely wide sampling of the diversity of cultural patterns that make up the American experience with alcohol. The collective portrait the editors have assembled extends in several dimensions: through time and history, across such social differ entiations as gender, age-grade, and social class, and through such major social institutions as the church and the family. Clearly the dominant dimension of variation in the material that follows, however, is ethnicity. The book offers us a sampler of unprecedented richness of the different experiences with alcohol of American ethnoreligious groups.
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Rum Maniacs

In Rum Maniacs, Matthew Warner Osborn examines the rise of pathological drinking as a subject of medical interest, social controversy, and lurid fascination in 19th century America.

Author: Matthew Warner Osborn

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226099927

Category: History

Page: 277

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"This important study explores the medicalization of alcohol abuse in the 19th century US” and its influence on American literature and popular culture (Choice). In Rum Maniacs, Matthew Warner Osborn examines the rise of pathological drinking as a subject of medical interest, social controversy, and lurid fascination in 19th century America. At the heart of that story is the disease that afflicted Edgar Allen Poe: delirium tremens. Poe’s alcohol addiction was so severe that it gave him hallucinations, such as his vivid recollection of standing in a prison cell, fearing for his life, as he watched men mutilate his mother’s body—an event that never happened. First described in 1813, delirium tremens and its characteristic hallucinations inspired sweeping changes in how the medical profession saw and treated the problems of alcohol abuse. Based on new theories of pathological anatomy, human physiology, and mental illness, the new diagnosis established the popular belief that habitual drinking could become a psychological and physiological disease. By midcentury, delirium tremens had inspired a wide range of popular theater, poetry, fiction, and illustration. This romantic fascination endured into the twentieth century, most notably in the classic Disney cartoon Dumbo, in which a pink pachyderm marching band haunts a drunken young elephant. Rum Maniacs reveals just how delirium tremens shaped the modern experience of alcohol addiction as a psychic struggle with inner demons.
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Alcoholism in North America Europe and Asia

This volume represents a landmark in the important and rapidly expanding literature of cross-cultural epidemiology that has been made possible by the worldwide popularity of the DSM-III and the multi-national use of a single survey ...

Author: Professor and Chairman Department of Psychiatry John E Helzer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195050908

Category: Medical

Page: 325

View: 612

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This volume represents a landmark in the important and rapidly expanding literature of cross-cultural epidemiology that has been made possible by the worldwide popularity of the DSM-III and the multi-national use of a single survey instrument: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS). Reviewing population survey findings across ten regions of North America, Europe, and Asia, this study is the first direct cross-national comparison of personal interview data on alcoholism, including prevalence rates and risk factors. The book carefully describes the background of the various surveys and the methods of analysis and comparison. Chapters on each region describe the prevalence of drinking problems, the symptomatic expression of alcoholism in that culture, aspects of the cultural background that are relevant to drinking behavior, and the association between alcoholism and other psychiatric disorders. Of particular importance in this volume is the inclusion of a chapter on alcoholism in the Socialist Republic of China, from which very little scientific information has been readily available. The inclusion of eastern and western cultural perspectives offers insight into both universal and culturally distinct aspects of alcoholism. The volume is essential reading for psychiatrists, epidemiologists, sociologists, and alcohol theorists, researchers and clinicians.
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Teens and Alcohol

Alcoholic. Republic. When English colonists immigrated to the land that would become the United States, they brought such favorable attitudes about alcohol and drinking traditions with them. On May 14, 1607, the first British colonists ...

Author: Michael V. Uschan

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN: 9781420509489

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 243

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According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, approximately 7.7 million Americans between the ages of 12 and 20 admit to consuming alcohol. However, overall rates of past month consumption, binge drinking, and heavy alcohol use have declined significantly between 2006 and 2015. This compelling resource offers a comprehensive and balanced discussion of teen alcohol consumption. The book takes a critical look at the many reasons teens drink, the history of drinking age laws, the emergence of hosting laws, and the punishment of parents who supply alcohol to their teenager.
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