BARBIZON

Welcome to The Barbizon, New York's premier women-only hotel. Built in 1927, New York's Barbizon Hotel was first intended as a home for the 'Modern Woman' seeking a career in the arts.

Author: PAULINA. BREN

Publisher:

ISBN: 1529393035

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The Barbizon

WELCOME TO THE BARBIZON, NEW YORK'S PREMIER WOMEN-ONLY HOTEL Built in 1927, New York's Barbizon Hotel was first intended as a home for the 'Modern Woman' seeking a career in the arts.

Author: Paulina Bren

Publisher: Two Roads

ISBN: 1529393027

Category:

Page: 356

View: 819

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WELCOME TO THE BARBIZON, NEW YORK'S PREMIER WOMEN-ONLY HOTEL Built in 1927, New York's Barbizon Hotel was first intended as a home for the 'Modern Woman' seeking a career in the arts. It became the place to stay for ambitious, independent women, who were lured by the promise of fame and good fortune. Sylvia Plath fictionalized her time there in The Bell Jar, and over the years, its 688 tiny pink 'highly feminine boudoirs' also housed Joan Crawford, Grace Kelly (notorious for sneaking in men), Joan Didion, Candice Bergen, Charlie's Angel Jaclyn Smith, Ali McGraw, Cybil Shepherd, Elaine Stritch, Liza Minnelli, Eudora Welty, The Cosby Show's Phylicia Rashad, and writers Mona Simpson and Ann Beattie, among many others. Mademoiselle boarded its summer interns there - perfectly turned-out young women, who would never be spotted hatless - as did Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School its students - in their white-gloves and kitten heels - and the Ford Modelling Agency its young models. Not everyone who passed through the Barbizon's doors was destined for greatness - for some it was a story of dashed hopes and expectations - but from the Jazz Age New Women of the 1920s, to the Liberated Women of the 1960s, until 1981 when the first men checked in, The Barbizon was a place where women could stand up and be counted. THE BARBIZON is a colourful, glamorous portrait of the lives of these young women, who came to New York looking for something more. It's a story of pushing the boundaries, of women's emancipation and of the generations of brilliant women who passed through its halls.
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The Barbizon

279 William Nicholas of Long Island: “Sammy Cahn Sings 'It's Been a Long, Long Time' to First Male Guests at the Barbizon; Ten-Story Heart Unfurled to Mark Occasion,” press release, copy accessed June 4, 2019, at http://www ...

Author: Paulina Bren

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781982123925

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 829

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From award-winning author Paulina Bren comes the “captivating portrait” (The Wall Street Journal) of New York’s most famous residential hotel—The Barbizon—and the remarkable women who lived there. Welcome to New York’s legendary hotel for women. Liberated from home and hearth by World War I, politically enfranchised and ready to work, women arrived to take their place in the dazzling new skyscrapers of Manhattan. But they did not want to stay in uncomfortable boarding houses. They wanted what men already had—exclusive residential hotels with maid service, workout rooms, and private dining. Built in 1927, at the height of the Roaring Twenties, the Barbizon Hotel was designed as a luxurious safe haven for the “Modern Woman” hoping for a career in the arts. Over time, it became the place to stay for any ambitious young woman hoping for fame and fortune. Sylvia Plath fictionalized her time there in The Bell Jar, and, over the years, it’s almost 700 tiny rooms with matching floral curtains and bedspreads housed, among many others, Titanic survivor Molly Brown; actresses Grace Kelly, Liza Minnelli, Ali MacGraw, Jaclyn Smith; and writers Joan Didion, Gael Greene, Diane Johnson, Meg Wolitzer. Mademoiselle magazine boarded its summer interns there, as did Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School its students and the Ford Modeling Agency its young models. Before the hotel’s residents were household names, they were young women arriving at the Barbizon with a suitcase and a dream. Not everyone who passed through the Barbizon’s doors was destined for success—for some, it was a story of dashed hopes—but until 1981, when men were finally let in, the Barbizon offered its residents a room of their own and a life without family obligations. It gave women a chance to remake themselves however they pleased; it was the hotel that set them free. No place had existed like it before or has since. “Poignant and intriguing” (The New Republic), The Barbizon weaves together a tale that has, until now, never been told. It is both a vivid portrait of the lives of these young women looking for something more and a “brilliant many-layered social history of women’s ambition and a rapidly changing New York through the 20th century” (The Guardian).
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The Barbizon School

Bibliography L. ROSENTHAL , Du romantisme au réalisme , 1839-1848 , Paris 1914 A. Hoeber , The Barbizon painters , being the story of the men of thirty ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106007649160

Category: Art, French

Page: 216

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The Saturday Evening Post

By Nan Robertson Off limits to men , The Barbizon Hotel for Women is a haven for New York career girls who like living in a skyscraper numery .

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ISBN: NWU:35556000807222

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Millet Corot and the School of Barbizon

As for the economic reasons for the Barbizon painters ' popularity , they could alone suffice to explain it . The Barbizon artists were the first to be the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066939003

Category: Barbizon school

Page: 187

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The Barbizon

'The story of the Barbizon is in many ways the story of American women in the twentieth century' Economist 'Illuminating . . . this vivid, well researched account is testament to its vibrant history and the women who made it such a ...

Author: Paulina Bren

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781529393057

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 247

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WELCOME TO THE BARBIZON, NEW YORK'S PREMIER WOMEN-ONLY HOTEL Built in 1927, New York's Barbizon Hotel was first intended as a home for the 'Modern Woman' seeking a career in the arts. It became the place to stay for ambitious, independent women, who were lured by the promise of fame and good fortune. Sylvia Plath fictionalized her time there in The Bell Jar, and over the years, its 688 tiny pink 'highly feminine boudoirs' also housed Joan Crawford, Grace Kelly (notorious for sneaking in men), Joan Didion, Candice Bergen, Charlie's Angel Jaclyn Smith, Ali MacGraw, Cybil Shepherd, Elaine Stritch, Liza Minnelli, Eudora Welty, The Cosby Show's Phylicia Rashad, and writers Mona Simpson and Ann Beattie, among many others. Mademoiselle boarded its summer interns there - perfectly turned-out young women, who would never be spotted hatless - as did Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School its students - in their white-gloves and kitten heels - and the Ford Modelling Agency its young models. Not everyone who passed through the Barbizon's doors was destined for greatness - for some it was a story of dashed hopes and expectations - but from the Jazz Age New Women of the 1920s, to the Liberated Women of the 1960s, until 1981 when the first men checked in, The Barbizon was a place where women could stand up and be counted. THE BARBIZON is a colourful, glamorous portrait of the lives of these young women, who came to New York looking for something more. It's a story of pushing the boundaries, of women's emancipation and of the generations of brilliant women who passed through its halls.
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Edward Armitage RA

The journey became much quicker and far more comfortable in the 1840s with the opening of a railway station at Melun, from where it was then a nine kilometre walk or carriage ride to Barbizon, passing through Chailly-en-Bière.

Author: Jill R Armitage

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781788035361

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 112

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Edward Armitage was a highly-esteemed 19th century artist who lived and worked at a time when the social fabric of Britain was being transformed by the Industrial Revolution and attitudes towards art were changing in favour of genres more appealing to the emerging middle classes. Coinciding with the 2017 bicentenary of Armitage’s birth, the book is based on Jill Armitage’s extensive research into her relative’s life and work. Born in 1817 to a family of wealthy northern industrialists, Edward Armitage trained in Bohemian Paris before making his name in Britain as one of the artists chosen to redecorate the new Houses of Parliament. He was one of the first artists to make the long journey to the Crimea during the war against Russia, and one of the first to include recent archaeological discoveries in his paintings. He was appointed Professor and Lecturer on Painting at the Royal Academy in 1875, where his outspoken views were sometimes controversial. But as Armitage grew older, his serious, French style of painting became increasingly unfashionable. In this well-illustrated biography, Jill provides the first comprehensive account of Armitage’s life and work, with detailed references to the social, historical and cultural context in which he lived. The book will appeal to fans of Armitage’s paintings, as well as those with an interest in art history and the Victorian era.
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Getty Research Journal No 5

Thomson, “The Barbizon School, Corot,” 184*85. 28. Thomson, “The Barbizon School, Corot,” 185. This is analogous to arguments made with respect to the work of Whistler, whom Thomson represented at the Goupil Gallery.

Author: Thomas W. Gaehtgens

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 9781606061367

Category: Art

Page: 220

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The Getty Research Journal publishes the original research underway at the Getty and seeks to foster an environment of collaborative scholarship among art historians, museum curators, and conservators. Articles explore the collections of the J. Paul Getty Museum and Research Institute, as well as the annual themes and ongoing research projects of the Research Institute. Shorter texts highlight new acquisitions and discoveries, and focus on the diverse tools for scholarship being developed at the Getty. This issue features essays on early modern alchemy; portraits of the Orsini family; a decorative design for a Borghese palace; the Eruditi Italiani archive; the collecting habits of Louis-Philippe, duc d'Orl�ans; F�lix Bracquemond's sketches of the Paris Commune; the art dealer David Croal Thomson; the Russian avant-garde book Mirskontsa; Malvina Hoffman's Heads and Tales; and Yves Klein at Galerie Schmela. In a new section about tools of art historical scholarship, authors discuss the Spanish translation of the Art & Architecture Thesaurus� and the creative potential of digital architectural taxonomies. Short texts examine ancient Roman terracotta fragments, prints by Albrecht D�rer, designs for the Palacio Salvo in Montevideo, the textile collection of Ulrich Middeldorf, a New York "pottery happening," and the German writer Christa Wolf.
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Carl W Peters

Prior to around 1885 there was no art DuMond and Old Lyme colony in Europe more magnetic to Americans than the one at Barbizon , the little village in the Fontainebleau Forest . " Expatriates like William Lamb Art life in Old Lyme ...

Author: Richard H. Love

Publisher: University Rochester Press

ISBN: 1580460240

Category: Art

Page: 927

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An account of the life and work of the American Scene painter Carl W. Peters, and the place of his work within the genre.
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Fodor s Essential France

On the western edge of the 62,000-acre Forest of Fontainebleau, the village of Barbizon retains its time-stained allure despite the intrusion of art galleries, souvenir shops, and busloads of tourists. The group of landscape painters ...

Author: Fodor's

Publisher: Fodor's Travel

ISBN: 9780307928566

Category: Travel

Page: 718

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Get inspired and plan your next trip with Fodor’s ebook travel guide to Essential France (including Paris, Ile-de-France, the Loire Valley, Normandy, Lyon and the Alps, and Provence and the French Riviera, with highlights in between). Intelligent Planning: Discover all of the essential, up-to-date travel insights you expect in a Fodor’s guide, including Fodor’s Choice dining and lodging, top experiences and attractions, and detailed planning advice. Easy Navigation for E-Readers: Whether you’re reading this ebook from start to finish or jumping from chapter to chapter as you develop your itinerary, Fodor’s makes it easy to find the information you need with a single touch. In addition to a traditional main table of contents for the ebook, each chapter opens with its own table of contents, making it easy to browse. Full-Color Photos and Maps: It’s hard not to fall in love with France as you flip through a vivid full-color photo album. Explore the layout of city centers and popular neighborhoods with easy-to-read full-color maps. Plus get an overview of French geography with the convenient atlas at the end of the ebook. What’s Covered? Get to Know Essential France: The Ile-de-France region is the nation’s heartland. Here Louis XIV built vainglorious Versailles, Chartres brings the faithful to their knees, and Monet’s Giverny enchants all. To the south, the Loire Valley offers Chenonceau, Chambord, and Saumur--the parade of royal and near-royal chateaus that magnificently capture France’s golden age of monarchy. Northwest Normandy is sculpted with cliff-lined coasts and has been home to saints and sculptors, with a dramatic past marked by Mont-St-Michel’s majestic abbey, Rouen’s towering cathedral, and the D-Day beaches. Local chefs rival their Parisian counterparts in treasure-filled Lyon, heart of a diverse region where you can ski Mont Blanc or take a heady trip along the Beaujolais Wine Road. Don’t miss Provence, famed for its Lavender Route, the honey-gold hill towns of Luberon, and vibrant cities like Aiz and Marseilles. This region was dazzlingly abstracted into geometric daubs of paint by van Gogh and Cézanne. The sprawl of pebble beaches and zillion-dollar houses of the French Riviera has always captivated sun lovers and socialites from amorous St-Tropez and beauteous Antibes to sophisticated Nice. No trip to France would be complete without a stop in Paris. A quayside vista that takes in the Seine, a passing boat, Notre-Dame, the Eiffel tower, and mansard roofs all in one generous sweep is enough to convince you that this is indeed the most beautiful city on Earth. Note: This ebook edition includes photographs and maps that will appear on black-and-white devices but are optimized for devices that support full-color images.
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The Barbizon School the Origins of Impressionism

Steven Adams re-evaluates the generation of landscape painters that preceded the Impressionists and illustrates the direct relationship between the paintings of Corot and Monet, Millet and Van Gogh.

Author: Steven Adams

Publisher: Phaidon Incorporated Limited

ISBN: UOM:39015032194402

Category: Art

Page: 240

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In 1863 Claude Monet and Frederic Bazille left Paris for Barbizon, a small village on the edge of the Forest of Fontainebleau, forty miles south-west of Paris. They came to this district to paint from nature in the open air and to make studies for landscape paintings, far from the pressures of city life. Together with Renoir and Sisley, they were following a well-trodden path taken by painters and tourists some thirty years earlier. Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot had been studying the fleeting effects of nature in the forest as early as 1822, and in the 1840s Charles-Emile Jacque, Gustave Courbet, Charles-Francois Daubigny and Jean-Francois Millet made frequent visits to the area, some later taking up permanent residence. Like many innovators, the Barbizon painters have attracted less attention than their followers. The names of Theodore Rousseau, Narcisse Diaz de la Pena and Georges Michel have virtually been forgotten, and the originality of their painting techniques and impulsive brush work attributed to those who later exploited them. In this first survey of the Barbizon School for twenty years. Steven Adams re-evaluates the generation of landscape painters that preceded the Impressionists and illustrates the direct relationship between the paintings of Corot and Monet, Millet and Van Gogh. He examines the development of landscape painting in nineteenth century France from the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy in 1816 to the outbreak of the Franco Prussian War in 1870, and discusses the cultural and political changes that influenced a more naturalistic painting style fifty years before the term 'Impressioniste' was first heard in Paris.
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Catalog of Copyright Entries Third Series

See KRAUSE , JEROME V. 68 p : BARBIZON SCHOOL OF FASHION MODELING , INC . , NEW YORK . The Barbizon School of Modeling and Personal Improvement . See BARBIZON STUDIO OF FASHION MODELING , INC . , NEW YORK .

Author: Library of Congress. Copyright Office

Publisher: Copyright Office, Library of Congress

ISBN: STANFORD:36105006357276

Category: Copyright

Page: 1514

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Art in an Age of Counterrevolution 1815 1848

The Barbizon School This brings us to the formation of the Barbizon school, an idealistic community of landscapists and their intellectual cronies located on the edge of the forest of Fontainebleau, and whose most important ...

Author: Albert Boime

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226063379

Category: Art

Page: 750

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Art for art's sake. Art created in pursuit of personal expression. In Art in an Age of Counterrevolution, Albert Boime rejects these popular modern notions and suggests that history—not internal drive or expressive urge—as the dynamic force that shapes art. This volume focuses on the astonishing range of art forms currently understood to fall within the broad category of Romanticism. Drawing on visual media and popular imagery of the time, this generously illustrated work examines the art of Romanticism as a reaction to the social and political events surrounding it. Boime reinterprets canonical works by such politicized artists as Goya, Delacroix, Géricault, Friedrich, and Turner, framing their work not by personality but by its sociohistorical context. Boime's capacious approach and scope allows him to incorporate a wide range of perspectives into his analysis of Romantic art, including Marxism, social history, gender identity, ecology, structuralism, and psychoanalytic theory, a reach that parallels the work of contemporary cultural historians and theorists such as Edward Said, Pierre Bourdieu, Eric Hobsbawm, Frederic Jameson, and T. J. Clark. Boime ultimately establishes that art serves the interests and aspirations of the cultural bourgeoisie. In grounding his arguments on their work and its scope and influence, he elucidates how all artists are inextricably linked to history. This book will be used widely in art history courses and exert enormous influence on cultural studies as well.
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Claude Monet

Narcisse Virgilio Diaz de la Peña belonged to a group of landscape painters known as the Barbizon School. The Barbizon painters came from a generation of artists born between the first and second decades of the nineteenth century.

Author: Nina Kalitina

Publisher: Parkstone International

ISBN: 9781780427317

Category: Art

Page: 200

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For Claude Monet the designation ‘impressionist’ always remained a source of pride. In spite of all the things critics have written about his work, Monet continued to be a true impressionist to the end of his very long life. He was so by deep conviction, and for his Impressionism he may have sacrificed many other opportunities that his enormous talent held out to him. Monet did not paint classical compositions with figures, and he did not become a portraitist, although his professional training included those skills. He chose a single genre for himself, landscape painting, and in that he achieved a degree of perfection none of his contemporaries managed to attain. Yet the little boy began by drawing caricatures. Boudin advised Monet to stop doing caricatures and to take up landscapes instead. The sea, the sky, animals, people, and trees are beautiful in the exact state in which nature created them – surrounded by air and light. Indeed, it was Boudin who passed on to Monet his conviction of the importance of working in the open air, which Monet would in turn transmit to his impressionist friends. Monet did not want to enrol at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He chose to attend a private school, L’Académie Suisse, established by an ex-model on the Quai d’Orfèvres near the Pont Saint-Michel. One could draw and paint from a live model there for a modest fee. This was where Monet met the future impressionist Camille Pissarro. Later in Gleyre’s studio, Monet met Auguste Renoir Alfred Sisley, and Frédéric Bazille. Monet considered it very important that Boudin be introduced to his new friends. He also told his friends of another painter he had found in Normandy. This was the remarkable Dutchman Jongkind. His landscapes were saturated with colour, and their sincerity, at times even their naïveté, was combined with subtle observation of the Normandy shore’s variable nature. At this time Monet’s landscapes were not yet characterized by great richness of colour. Rather, they recalled the tonalities of paintings by the Barbizon artists, and Boudin’s seascapes. He composed a range of colour based on yellow-brown or blue-grey. At the Third Impressionist Exhibition in 1877 Monet presented a series of paintings for the first time: seven views of the Saint-Lazare train station. He selected them from among twelve he had painted at the station. This motif in Monet’s work is in line not only with Manet’s Chemin de fer (The Railway) and with his own landscapes featuring trains and stations at Argenteuil, but also with a trend that surfaced after the railways first began to appear. In 1883, Monet had bought a house in the village of Giverny, near the little town of Vernon. At Giverny, series painting became one of his chief working procedures. Meadows became his permanent workplace. When a journalist, who had come from Vétheuil to interview Monet, asked him where his studio was, the painter answered, “My studio! I’ve never had a studio, and I can’t see why one would lock oneself up in a room. To draw, yes – to paint, no”. Then, broadly gesturing towards the Seine, the hills, and the silhouette of the little town, he declared, “There’s my real studio.”Monet began to go to London in the last decade of the nineteenth century. He began all his London paintings working directly from nature, but completed many of them afterwards, at Giverny. The series formed an indivisible whole, and the painter had to work on all his canvases at one time. A friend of Monet’s, the writer Octave Mirbeau, wrote that he had accomplished a miracle. With the help of colours he had succeeded in recreating on the canvas something almost impossible to capture: he was reproducing sunlight, enriching it with an infinite number of reflections. Alone among the impressionists, Claude Monet took an almost scientific study of the possibilities of colour to its limits; it is unlikely that one could have gone any further in that direction.
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Eanger Irving Couse

William Morris Hunt, a highly influential Boston artist, was a “tastemaker and proselytizer for modern French painting” in that city.38 The Barbizon fever was slower in coming to New York City, but by the late 1860s, New Yorkers had a ...

Author: Virginia Couse Leavitt

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806164434

Category: Art

Page: 400

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Eanger Irving Couse (1866–1936) showed remarkable promise as a young art student. His lifelong interest in Native American cultures also started at an early age, inspired by encounters with Chippewa Indians living near his hometown, Saginaw, Michigan. After studying in Europe, Couse began spending summers in New Mexico, where in 1915 he helped found the famous Taos Society of Artists, serving as its first president and playing a major role in its success. This richly illustrated volume, featuring full-color reproductions of his artwork, is the first scholarly exploration of Couse’s noteworthy life and artistic achievements. Drawing on extensive research, Virginia Couse Leavitt gives an intimate account of Couse’s experiences, including his early struggles as an art student in the United States and abroad, his study of Native Americans, his winter home and studio in New York City, and his life in New Mexico after he relocated to Taos. In examining Couse’s role as one of the original six founders of the Taos Society of Artists, the author provides new information about the art colony’s early meetings, original members, and first exhibitions. As a scholar of art history, Leavitt has spent decades researching her subject, who also happens to be her grandfather. Her unique access to the Couse family archives has allowed her to mine correspondence, photographs, sketchbooks, and memorabilia, all of which add fresh insight into the American art scene in the early 1900s. Of particular interest is the correspondence of Couse’s wife, Virginia Walker, an art student in Paris when the couple first met. Her letters home to her family in Washington State offer a vivid picture of her husband’s student life in Paris, where Couse studied under the famous painter William Bouguereau at the Académie Julian. Whereas many artists of the early twentieth century pursued a radically modern style, Couse held true to his formal academic training throughout his career. He gained renown for his paintings of southwestern landscapes and his respectful portraits of Native peoples. Through his depictions of the domestic and spiritual lives of Pueblo Indians, Couse helped mitigate the prejudices toward Native Americans that persisted during this era.
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In Pursuit of the Natural Sign

I haven't cited Troyon, a distinguished French landscapist in vain as they say; you'll see why later" (8:502-6). Although not formally considered a member of the Barbizon School, because of proximity in age and genre preferences, ...

Author: Gayana Jurkevich

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 0838754139

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 259

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This is the first major study on Azorin to appear in two decades. The first part explores parallels between the cultural milieus in France and Spain when both countries lost their colonies in the second half of the nineteenth century. The second part studies the fiction and essays of Jose Martinez Ruiz (Azorin). Illustrated.
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The Essential Guide for Driving in France

16,000 ) itself - or better yet , in the nearby famous artist's village of Barbizon for a leisurely “ last night on the road ” dinner and overnight . Barbizon ( pop . 1,600 ) is located just off N 7 , 10 km / 6 mi north of Fontainebleau ...

Author: Orv Strandoo

Publisher: Danforth Book Distribution

ISBN: 1887542531

Category: Travel

Page: 104

View: 858

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Touring in France becomes 'tranquillamente' when you take along The Essential Driving Guide for France as your traveling companion. Within these pages you will find everything you need to know, quickly and easily -- the rules of the road and autostrada etiquette, the best routes to follow and those spots to avoid, a time-tested itinerary for the optimum French experience and tips on visiting the country's most enchanting sights. It's all here, at your fingertips, just waiting to show you the joie de vivre for which France is so famous.
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Great American Hotel Architects Volume 2

The Barbizon Hotel advertised that it was a cultural and social center that included concerts on radio station WOR, dramatic performances by the Barbizon Players, the Irish Theater with actors from the Abbey Theater, art exhibits, ...

Author: Stanley Turkel CMHS

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781665502528

Category: Architecture

Page: 236

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The fourteen architects featured in this book designed 304 hotels and apartment hotels. Many were designed on the European plan for families to live without full service kitchens. Meals were prepared and served in restaurant-type dining rooms catering exclusively to residents and their families. The apartment hotels employed full-time service staffs who prepared and served daily room service meals. The first apartment hotels were built between 1880 and 1895. They were followed by a second wave of construction after the passage of the 1899 building code and the 1901 Tenement House Law. The third wave of apartment hotel construction occurred during the 1920s and ended with the Great Depression of the thirties. The passage of the Multiple Dwelling Act of 1929 altered height and bulk restrictions and permitted high-rise apartment buildings for the first time.
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American Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

it is evident that his subject, the peasant in his rural environment, is drawn as much from his experience on the Ile d'Orléans as from Barbizon precedents. Not until 1900, when his reputation was well established in the United States, ...

Author: Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN: 9780870992445

Category: Painting

Page: 628

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One of three chronologically arranged catalogues that document the Metropolitan Museum's outstanding collection of American paintings.
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