The Black Death and the Transformation of the West


Author: David Herlihy
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674744233
Category: History
Page: 128
View: 9452
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Looking beyond the view of the plague as unmitigated catastrophe, Herlihy finds evidence for its role in the advent of new population controls, the establishment of universities, the spread of Christianity, the dissemination of vernacular cultures, and even the rise of nationalism. This book, which displays a distinguished scholar's masterly synthesis of diverse materials, reveals that the Black Death can be considered the cornerstone of the transformation of Europe.

Plague, Quarantines and Geopolitics in the Ottoman Empire


Author: Birsen Bulmus
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748655476
Category: Medical
Page: 208
View: 8703
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A sweeping examination of Ottoman plague treatise writers from the Black Death until 1923

The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople


Author: S. Wise Bauer
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393059766
Category: History
Page: 785
View: 4986
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Beginning in the heady days just after the First Crusade, this volume—the third in the series that began with and —chronicles the contradictions of a world in transition.

In the Wake of the Plague

The Black Death and the World It Made
Author: Norman F. Cantor
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439136025
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 7798
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Much of what we know about the greatest medical disaster ever, the Black Plague of the fourteenth century, is wrong. The details of the Plague etched in the minds of terrified schoolchildren -- the hideous black welts, the high fever, and the final, awful end by respiratory failure -- are more or less accurate. But what the Plague really was, and how it made history, remain shrouded in a haze of myths. Norman Cantor, the premier historian of the Middle Ages, draws together the most recent scientific discoveries and groundbreaking historical research to pierce the mist and tell the story of the Black Death afresh, as a gripping, intimate narrative. In the Wake of the Plague presents a microcosmic view of the Plague in England (and on the continent), telling the stories of the men and women of the fourteenth century, from peasant to priest, and from merchant to king. Cantor introduces a fascinating cast of characters. We meet, among others, fifteen-year-old Princess Joan of England, on her way to Spain to marry a Castilian prince; Thomas of Birmingham, abbot of Halesowen, responsible for his abbey as a CEO is for his business in a desperate time; and the once-prominent landowner John le Strange, who sees the Black Death tear away his family's lands and then its very name as it washes, unchecked, over Europe in wave after wave. Cantor argues that despite the devastation that made the Plague so terrifying, the disease that killed more than 40 percent of Europe's population had some beneficial results. The often literal demise of the old order meant that new, more scientific thinking increasingly prevailed where church dogma had once reigned supreme. In effect, the Black Death heralded an intellectual revolution. There was also an explosion of art: tapestries became popular as window protection against the supposedly airborne virus, and a great number of painters responded to the Plague. Finally, the Black Death marked an economic sea change: the onset of what Cantor refers to as turbocapitalism; the peasants who survived the Plague thrived, creating Europe's first class of independent farmers. Here are those stories and others, in a tale of triumph coming out of the darkest horror, wrapped up in a scientific mystery that persists, in part, to this day. Cantor's portrait of the Black Death's world is pro-vocative and captivating. Not since Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror have medieval men and women been brought so vividly to life. The greatest popularizer of the Middle Ages has written the period's most fascinating narrative.

The Fifteenth Century XII

Society in an Age of Plague
Author: Linda Clark,Carole Rawcliffe
Publisher: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843838753
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 9866
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Described as "a golden age of pathogens", the long fifteenth century was notable for a series of international, national and regional epidemics that had a profound effect upon the fabric of society. The impact of pestilence upon the literary, religious, social and political life of men, women and children throughout Europe and beyond continues to excite lively debate among historians, as the ten papers presented in this volume confirm. They deal with the response of urban communities in England, France and Italy to matters of public health, governance and welfare, as well as addressing the reactions of the medical profession to successive outbreaks of disease, and of individuals to the omnipresence of Death, while two, very different, essays examine the important, if sometimes controversial, contribution now being made by microbiologists to our understanding of the Black Death.

Encyclopedia of the Black Death


Author: Joseph P. Byrne Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598842544
Category: History
Page: 429
View: 6399
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This encyclopedia provides 300 interdisciplinary, cross-referenced entries that document the effect of the plague on Western society across the four centuries of the second plague pandemic, balancing medical history and technical matters with historical, cultural, social, and political factors. • 300 A–Z interdisciplinary entries on medical matters and historical issues • Each entry includes up-to-date resources for further research

The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History


Author: Andrew C. Isenberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199394474
Category: History
Page: 640
View: 7613
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Maquiavelo


Author: Quentin Skinner
Publisher: Alianza Editorial Sa
ISBN: 9788420649382
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 144
View: 2773
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Las ideas de MAQUIAVELO (1469-1527) contribuyeron de forma decisiva a configurar una manera radicalmente nueva de analizar el funcionamiento real de la vida social y de los mecanismos de poder. El gran pensador florentino observa QUENTIN SKINNER cultivó «una particular tradición humanística del republicanismo clásico»; los aspectos creativos y originales de su pensamiento nacen precisamente de sus reacciones polémicas ante ese cuerpo de creencias heredadas a las que continuó prestando su adhesión básica a lo largo de su vida. Esta monografía sitúa la biografía y las obras de Maquiavelo en el contexto cultural de la Italia renacentista y los problemas creados por el reordenamiento del mapa estatal europeo. El resultado de esa fecunda interrelación fue una nueva visión de la realidad política articulada en torno a una idea central: que la clave del poder se halla en la capacidad de los gobernantes para reconocer la fuerza de las circunstancias, aceptar los dictados de la necesidad y armonizar el propio comportamiento con el signo de los tiempos. Obras de Maquiavelo en esta misma colección: «El Príncipe» (CS 3401) y «Discursos sobre la primera década de Tito Livio» (CS 3407).

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World


Author: Jack Weatherford
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307237818
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 9327
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The name Genghis Khan often conjures the image of a relentless, bloodthirsty barbarian on horseback leading a ruthless band of nomadic warriors in the looting of the civilized world. But the surprising truth is that Genghis Khan was a visionary leader whose conquests joined backward Europe with the flourishing cultures of Asia to trigger a global awakening, an unprecedented explosion of technologies, trade, and ideas. In Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Jack Weatherford, the only Western scholar ever to be allowed into the Mongols’ “Great Taboo”—Genghis Khan’s homeland and forbidden burial site—tracks the astonishing story of Genghis Khan and his descendants, and their conquest and transformation of the world. Fighting his way to power on the remote steppes of Mongolia, Genghis Khan developed revolutionary military strategies and weaponry that emphasized rapid attack and siege warfare, which he then brilliantly used to overwhelm opposing armies in Asia, break the back of the Islamic world, and render the armored knights of Europe obsolete. Under Genghis Khan, the Mongol army never numbered more than 100,000 warriors, yet it subjugated more lands and people in twenty-five years than the Romans conquered in four hundred. With an empire that stretched from Siberia to India, from Vietnam to Hungary, and from Korea to the Balkans, the Mongols dramatically redrew the map of the globe, connecting disparate kingdoms into a new world order. But contrary to popular wisdom, Weatherford reveals that the Mongols were not just masters of conquest, but possessed a genius for progressive and benevolent rule. On every level and from any perspective, the scale and scope of Genghis Khan’s accomplishments challenge the limits of imagination. Genghis Khan was an innovative leader, the first ruler in many conquered countries to put the power of law above his own power, encourage religious freedom, create public schools, grant diplomatic immunity, abolish torture, and institute free trade. The trade routes he created became lucrative pathways for commerce, but also for ideas, technologies, and expertise that transformed the way people lived. The Mongols introduced the first international paper currency and postal system and developed and spread revolutionary technologies like printing, the cannon, compass, and abacus. They took local foods and products like lemons, carrots, noodles, tea, rugs, playing cards, and pants and turned them into staples of life around the world. The Mongols were the architects of a new way of life at a pivotal time in history. In Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Jack Weatherford resurrects the true history of Genghis Khan, from the story of his relentless rise through Mongol tribal culture to the waging of his devastatingly successful wars and the explosion of civilization that the Mongol Empire unleashed. This dazzling work of revisionist history doesn’t just paint an unprecedented portrait of a great leader and his legacy, but challenges us to reconsider how the modern world was made. From the Hardcover edition.

Contesting the Renaissance


Author: William Caferro
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444391329
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 3394
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this book, William Caferro asks if the Renaissance was really a period of progress, reason, the emergence of the individual, and the beginning of modernity. An influential investigation into the nature of the European Renaissance Summarizes scholarly debates about the nature of the Renaissance Engages with specific controversies concerning gender identity, economics, the emergence of the modern state, and reason and faith Takes a balanced approach to the many different problems and perspectives that characterize Renaissance studies

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World
Author: Lincoln Paine
Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd
ISBN: 1782393579
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 3953
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A monumental, wholly accessible work of scholarship that retells human history through the story of mankind's relationship with the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history that reveals in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world's waterways. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors' first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India, Southeast and East Asia who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish vibrant overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European overseas expansion. His narrative traces subsequent developments in commercial and naval shipping through the post-Cold War era. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be traced to the sea.

The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain


Author: Roderick Floud,Paul Johnson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521527361
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 552
View: 777
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This is a readable and comprehensive account of British economic history from 1700 to 1860.

The Transformation of the North Atlantic World, 1492-1763

An Introduction
Author: Michael J. Seymour
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275973803
Category: History
Page: 257
View: 309
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Details how a century of virtual Iberian monopoly in Atlantic empire became displaced by an Anglophone hegemony by 1763.

A Knight at the Movies

Medieval History on Film
Author: John Aberth
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135257264
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 3781
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Imagining the Middle Ages is an unprecedented examination of the historical content of films depicting the medieval period from the 11th to the 15th centuries. Historians increasingly feel the need to weigh in on popular depictions of the past, since so much of the public's knowledge of history comes from popular mediums. Aberth dissects how each film interpreted the period, offering estimations of the historical accuracy of the works and demonstrating how they project their own contemporary era's obsessions and fears onto the past.

Rats

A Year With New York's Most Unwanted Inhabitants
Author: Robert Sullivan
Publisher: Granta Books
ISBN: 1847087884
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 256
View: 7462
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Surprisingly funny and compulsively readable, Rats is an unlikely account of a year spent in a garbage-strewn alley in lower Manhattan. Sullivan spends the year with a notebook and night-vision goggles, hunting for fabled rat-kings, trapping a rat of his own, and trying (and failing) to conquer his own fear of rats. He meets the exterminators, garbage men and civic activists who play their part in the centuries-old war between human city-dweller and wild city rat. He travels to a bizarre Midwestern conference on rats that brings together the leading experts on rat history, behaviour, and control (did you know that one pair of rats can produce 15,000 descendants in a year? That rats' teeth are harder than steel?). In the process, he discovers the many ways in which rats' lives mirror those of humans. Sullivan's unusual and absorbing book earns a place alongside the classics of travel writing.

Law and Revolution, the Formation of the Western Legal Tradition


Author: Harold J. Berman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674020856
Category: Law
Page: 672
View: 7689
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The roots of modern Western legal institutions and concepts go back nine centuries to the Papal Revolution, when the Western church established its political and legal unity and its independence from emperors, kings, and feudal lords. Out of this upheaval came the Western idea of integrated legal systems consciously developed over generations and centuries. Harold J. Berman describes the main features of these systems of law, including the canon law of the church, the royal law of the major kingdoms, the urban law of the newly emerging cities, feudal law, manorial law, and mercantile law. In the coexistence and competition of these systems he finds an important source of the Western belief in the supremacy of law. Written simply and dramatically, carrying a wealth of detail for the scholar but also a fascinating story for the layman, the book grapples with wideranging questions of our heritage and our future. One of its main themes is the interaction between the Western belief in legal evolution and the periodic outbreak of apocalyptic revolutionary upheavals. Berman challenges conventional nationalist approaches to legal history, which have neglected the common foundations of all Western legal systems. He also questions conventional social theory, which has paid insufficient attention to the origin of modem Western legal systems and has therefore misjudged the nature of the crisis of the legal tradition in the twentieth century.

Realm of St. Stephen

A History of Medieval Hungary
Author: Pál Engel,Tamás Pálosfalvi,Andrew Ayton
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781850439776
Category: History
Page: 452
View: 1811
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Now recognized as the standard work on the subject, Realm of St Stephen is a comprehensive history of medieval Eastern and Central Europe. Pál Engel traces the establishment of the medieval kingdom of Hungary from its conquest by the Magyar tribes in 895 until defeat by the Ottomans at the battle of Mohacs in 1526. He shows the development of the dominant Magyars who, upon inheriting an almost empty land, absorbed the remaining Slavic peoples into their culture after the original communities had largely disappeared. Engel's book is an accessible and highly readable history.

Cengage Advantage Books: World History, Complete


Author: William J. Duiker,Jackson J. Spielvogel
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133710093
Category: History
Page: 1216
View: 8540
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this economically priced version of WORLD HISTORY, Seventh Edition, offers readers the complete narrative with only the most essential features, photos, and maps. All volumes feature a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history text. Noted teachers and scholars William J. Duiker and Jackson J. Spielvogel present a balanced, highly readable overview of world history that explores common challenges and experiences of the human past and identifies key patterns over time. Thorough coverage of political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, cultural, and military history is integrated into a chronological framework to help students gain an appreciation and understanding of the distinctive character and development of individual cultures in society. This approach helps students link events together in a broad comparative and global framework, thereby placing the contemporary world in a more meaningful historical context. CENGAGE ADVANTAGE BOOKS: WORLD HISTORY includes over 100 maps and excerpts of over 100 primary sources that enliven the past while introducing students to the source material of historical scholarship. Available in the following split options: CENGAGE ADVANTAGE BOOKS: WORLD HISTORY, Seventh Edition (Chapters 1-30); Volume I: To 1800 (Chapters 1-18); Volume II: Since 1500 (Chapters 14-30). Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Moved by the Past

Discontinuity and Historical Mutation
Author: Eelco Runia
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231537573
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 2728
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Historians go to great lengths to avoid confronting discontinuity, searching for explanations as to why such events as the fall of the Berlin Wall, George W. Bush's invasion of Iraq, and the introduction of the euro logically develop from what came before. Moved by the Past radically breaks with this tradition of predating the past, incites us to fully acknowledge the discontinuous nature of discontinuities, and proposes to use the fact that history is propelled by unforeseeable leaps and bounds as a starting point for a truly evolutionary conception of history. Integrating research from a variety of disciplines, Eelco Runia identifies two modes of being "moved by the past": regressive and revolutionary. In the regressive mode, the past may either overwhelm us—as in nostalgia—or provoke us to act out what we believe to be solidly dead. When we are moved by the past in a revolutionary sense, we may be said to embody history: we burn our bridges behind us and create accomplished facts we have no choice but to live up to. In the final thesis of Moved by the Past, humans energize their own evolution by habitually creating situations ("catastrophes" or sublime historical events) that put a premium on mutations. This book therefore illuminates how every now and then we chase ourselves away from what we were and force ourselves to become what we are. Proposing a simple yet radical change in perspective, Runia profoundly reorients how we think and theorize about history.

For the Common Good

The Bohemian Land Law and the Beginning of the Hussite Revolution
Author: Jeanne Grant
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004283269
Category: History
Page: 166
View: 2525
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In For the Common Good Jeanne E. Grant explores the legally grounded mentality of nobles within the Czech kingdom to understand their political actions at the beginning of the Hussite Revolution.