The British Superhero

The British superhero has had a considerable impact on comics. Despite the fact that the British comics industry has declined over the last several decades and reprints of American superhero material or licensed toy or television ...

Author: Chris Murray

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496807380

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 701

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Chris Murray reveals the largely unknown and rather surprising history of the British superhero. It is often thought that Britain did not have its own superheroes, yet Murray demonstrates that there were a great many in Britain and that they were often used as a way to comment on the relationship between Britain and America. Sometimes they emulated the style of American comics, but they also frequently became sites of resistance to perceived American political and cultural hegemony, drawing upon satire and parody as a means of critique. Murray illustrates that the superhero genre is a blend of several influences, and that in British comics these influences were quite different from those in America, resulting in some contrasting approaches to the figure of the superhero. He identifies the origins of the superhero and supervillain in nineteenth-century popular culture such as the penny dreadfuls and boys' weeklies and in science fiction writing of the 1920s and 1930s. He traces the emergence of British superheroes in the 1940s, the advent of "fake" American comics, and the reformatting of reprinted material. Murray then chronicles the British Invasion of the 1980s and the pivotal roles in American superhero comics and film production held by British artists today. This book will challenge views about British superheroes and the comics creators who fashioned them. Murray brings to light a gallery of such comics heroes as the Amazing Mr X, Powerman, Streamline, Captain Zenith, Electroman, Mr Apollo, Masterman, Captain Universe, Marvelman, Kelly's Eye, Steel Claw, the Purple Hood, Captain Britain, Supercats, Bananaman, Paradax, Jack Staff, and SuperBob. He reminds us of the significance of many such creators and artists as Len Fullerton, Jock McCail, Jack Glass, Denis Gifford, Bob Monkhouse, Dennis M. Reader, Mick Anglo, Brendan McCarthy, Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Dave Gibbons, and Mark Millar.
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Comics and Graphic Novels

In his historical survey The British Superhero (2017), Chris Murray compares the American original with the ways in which British superheroes have manifested themselves throughout the decades and the ways British authors have influenced ...

Author: Julia Round

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350336070

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 345

View: 284

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Providing an overview of the dynamic field of comics and graphic novels for students and researchers, this Essential Guide contextualises the major research trends, debates and ideas that have emerged in Comics Studies over the past decades. Interdisciplinary and international in its scope, the critical approaches on offer spread across a wide range of strands, from the formal and the ideological to the historical, literary and cultural. Its concise chapters provide accessible introductions to comics methodologies, comics histories and cultures across the world, high-profile creators and titles, insights from audience and fan studies, and important themes and genres, such as autobiography and superheroes. It also surveys the alternative and small press alongside general reference works and textbooks on comics. Each chapter is complemented by list of key reference works.
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The British Comic Book Invasion

few actual British superhero comics, originally serialized from 1954 to 1963. Its publisher, L. Miller & Son, had been in the business of reprinting the popular American superhero series Captain Marvel in the early 1950s.

Author: Jochen Ecke

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476674155

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 385

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What makes a successful comics creator? How can storytelling stay exciting and innovative? How can genres be kept vital? Writers and artists in the highly competitive U.S. comics mainstream have always had to explore these questions but they were especially pressing in the 1980s. As comics readers grew older they started calling for more sophisticated stories. They were also no longer just following the adventures of popular characters--writers and artists with distinctive styles were in demand. DC Comics and Marvel went looking for such mavericks and found them in the United Kingdom. Creators like Alan Moore (Watchmen, Saga of the Swamp Thing), Grant Morrison (The Invisibles, Flex Mentallo) and Garth Ennis (Preacher) migrated from the anarchical British comics industry to the U.S. mainstream and shook up the status quo yet came to rely on the genius of the American system.
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The Superhero Symbol

In his study The British Superhero, Chris Murray observes, “The range of modes of representation found in British superhero comics, from reverence to parody, illuminates the complexity of British feelings toward America, ...

Author: Liam Burke

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813597164

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 337

View: 681

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Bringing together superhero scholars and key industry figures The Superhero Symbol unmasks how superheroes have become so pervasive in media, culture, and politics. This timely collection explores how these powerful icons are among the entertainment industry's most valuable intellectual properties, yet can be appropriated for everything from activism to cosplay and real-life vigilantism.
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Superheroes on World Screens

For further information on British attitudes toward the superhero, see for example Anja MüllerWood (2010), Karin Kukkonen (2010), Ben Little (2010), and Jochen Ecke (2013). Chris Murray's (2010) essay “Signals from Airstrip One: The ...

Author: Rayna Denison

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781626746749

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 518

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Superheroes such as Superman and Spider-Man have spread all over the world. As this edited volume shows, many national cultures have created or reimagined the idea of the superhero, while the realm of superheroes now contains many icons whose histories borrow from local folklore and legends. Consequently, the superhero needs reconsideration, to be regarded as part of both local and global culture as well as examined for the rich meanings that such broad origins and re-workings create. This collection stands out as the first concentrated attempt to think through the meanings and significance of the superhero, not only as a product of culture in the United States, but as a series of local, transnational, and global exchanges in popular media. Through analysis of mainly film, television, and computer screens, contributors offer three challenges to the idea of the "American" superhero: transnational reimagining of superhero culture, emerging local superheroes, and the use of local superheroes to undermine dominant political ideologies. The essays explore the shifting transnational meanings of Doctor Who, Thor, and the Phantom, as these characters are reimagined in world culture. Other chapters chart the rise of local superheroes from India, the Middle East, Thailand, and South Korea. These explorations demonstrate how far superheroes have traveled to inspire audiences worldwide.
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The Contemporary Superhero Film

In previous decades comic book superheroes like Union Jack (1976), Captain Britain (1976), and Beefeater (1989), with an exaggerated sense of Britishness evident even in their names, have been American interpretations of British ...

Author: Terence McSweeney

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231549790

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 157

View: 674

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Audiences around the globe continue to flock to see the latest releases from Marvel and DC studios, making it clear that superhero films resonate with the largest global audience that Hollywood has ever reached. Yet despite dominating theater screens like never before, the superhero genre remains critically marginalized—ignored at best and more often actively maligned. Terence McSweeney examines this global phenomenon, providing a concise and up-to-date overview of the superhero genre. He lays out its narrative codes and conventions, exploring why it appeals to diverse audiences and what it has to say about the world in the first two decades of the twenty-first century. Unpacking the social, ideological, and cultural content of superhero films, he argues that the genre should be considered a barometer of contemporary social anxieties and a reflection of cultural values. McSweeney scrutinizes representations of gender, race, and sexuality as well as how the genre’s conventions relate to and comment on contemporary political debates. Beyond American contributions to the genre, the book also features extensive analysis of superhero films from all over the world, contrasting them with the dominant U.S. model. The book’s presentation of a range of case studies and critical debates is accessible and engaging for students, scholars, and enthusiasts at all levels.
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The British Superhero

Tracking the surprising rise of the British superhero

Author: Chris Murray

Publisher:

ISBN: 1496820266

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 692

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Chris Murray reveals the largely unknown and rather surprising history of the British superhero. It is often thought that Britain did not have its own superheroes, yet Murray demonstrates that there were a great many in Britain and that they were often used as a way to comment on the relationship between Britain and America. Sometimes they emulated the style of American comics, but they also frequently became sites of resistance to perceived American political and cultural hegemony, drawing upon satire and parody as a means of critique. Murray illustrates that the superhero genre is a blend of several influences, and that in British comics these influences were quite different from those in America, resulting in some contrasting approaches to the figure of the superhero. He identifies the origins of the superhero and supervillain in nineteenth-century popular culture such as the penny dreadfuls and boys' weeklies and in science fiction writing of the 1920s and 1930s. He traces the emergence of British superheroes in the 1940s, the advent of "fake" American comics, and the reformatting of reprinted material. Murray then chronicles the British Invasion of the 1980s and the pivotal roles in American superhero comics and film production held by British artists today. This book will challenge views about British superheroes and the comics creators who fashioned them. Murray brings to light a gallery of such comics heroes as the Amazing Mr X, Powerman, Streamline, Captain Zenith, Electroman, Mr Apollo, Masterman, Captain Universe, Marvelman, Kelly's Eye, Steel Claw, the Purple Hood, Captain Britain, Supercats, Bananaman, Paradax, Jack Staff, and SuperBob. He reminds us of the significance of many such creators and artists as Len Fullerton, Jock McCail, Jack Glass, Denis Gifford, Bob Monkhouse, Dennis M. Reader, Mick Anglo, Brendan McCarthy, Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Dave Gibbons, and Mark Millar.
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The Rough Guide to Superheroes

THE VERY BEST OF BRITISH SUPERHEROES MAY HAVE BEEN PERFECTED - AND PATENTED - IN AMERICA , BUT THE GENRE'S LEADING MEN OWE A FAIR DEBT TO SUCH HEROES OF BRITISH POPULAR FICTION AS SHERLOCK HOLMES , BULLDOG DRUMMOND AND EVEN JAMES ...

Author: Paul Simpson

Publisher:

ISBN: 1843533863

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 393

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Featuring the mind-bending truth about the world's bravest and baddest, this book includes all you need to know about the superheroes who save us - and their vile enemies.
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The Worst of British

These guys truly are the Worst of British!

Author: Simon Burley

Publisher:

ISBN: 1326369717

Category:

Page: 0

View: 138

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Help for the struggling Squadron UK Referee. 13 fully detailed new villains from the game's creator (and friends). Especially created to challenge, threaten and flummox their players - ranging from streets level to nearly unbeatable. And by FULLY DETAILED we're talking about: -fully rationalised abilities and powers -detailed backgrounds -tactics -team-tactics -refinements and developments -cronies and followers -personality, quotes and quips Throw in a campaign outline which utilises all the characters and you've got an unbeatable package. These guys truly are the Worst of British!
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DOLPHINMAN

The book Cover is in black & white High gloss finish with.... Black & metallic warm.. Full colour drawings.. Throughout..! This short Story book will appeal to everyone worldwide Who grew up with Super heroes.

Author: Dennis Jones

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781491880098

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 84

View: 805

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DOLPHINMAN. A new Si-Fi Adventure...for... Teenagers & Grown Ups Who have everything..! The Must have No 1 First Issue. From the Author.. Artist..Dennis Jones . This Is sure to be a Collectors Item. The first real Super Hero to come out of the UK for a long time that really looks the part. The boutique style book would look fab in any office, lobby or cafe bar home etc, 84 full colour pages adventure, ideal for Xmas or Birthday gift for the one who has... everything...! The book Cover is in black & white High gloss finish with.... Black & metallic warm.. Full colour drawings.. Throughout..! This short Story book will appeal to everyone worldwide Who grew up with Super heroes.
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