The Construction of Negotiated Meaning

Literate acts - Constructing negotiated meaning - Construction as a metaphor for meaning making - Construction sites : observations of meaning making in learning, development, and literacy - Collaborative planning : an educator's account of ...

Author: Linda Flower

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809319012

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 334

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Literate acts - Constructing negotiated meaning - Construction as a metaphor for meaning making - Construction sites : observations of meaning making in learning, development, and literacy - Collaborative planning : an educator's account of a constructive process - Welcome to college : construction and negotiation in a freshman class - Strategic knowledge and the logic of a learner - Metacognition : a strategic response to thinking - Reflection and the reconstruction of a literate practice.
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Time To Know Them

Flower (1994), too, in The Construction of Negotiated Meaning, ... this constructive literate act may also become a process of negotiation in which ...

Author: Marilyn S. Sternglass

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136684746

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 348

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In a time of declining resources in institutions of higher education, we grapple with how priorities are to be set for the limited resources available. Most vulnerable are those students labeled underprepared by colleges and universities. Should we argue that the limited resources available ought to be used to support these students through their undergraduate years? And, if we decide that we want to do that, what evidence of their potential for success can we provide that will justify the use of these resources? Through longitudinal research that follows students who have been so labeled over all their college years, we can begin to find answers to these questions. Time to Know Them is the first book that follows the experiences of a group of students over their entire academic experience. No previous studies have brought together the factors incorporated in this study: *examining writing and learning on a true longitudinal basis; *studying a multicultural urban population; *investigating the relationship between writing and learning by examining papers written over time for regularly assigned academic courses across a range of disciplines; and *taking into consideration non-academic factors that influence academic performance such as race, gender, socio-economic status, and ideological orientation. Through interviews twice a semester over six years, the collection of papers written for all courses, observations of instructional settings, and analysis of required institutional tests of writing, the author has been able to pull together a more complete picture of writing and intellectual development over the college years than has previously been available in any study. Students are seen to acquire the ability to handle more complex reasoning tasks as they find themselves in more challenging intellectual settings and where risk-taking and exploration of new ideas are valued. The integration of students' previous life experiences into their academic studies allows them to analyze, critique, modify, and apply their previously held world views to their new learning. These changes are seen to occur over time with instructional settings and support providing key roles in writing development. Personal factors in students' lives present difficulties that require persistence and dedication to overcome. Never before have the complexities of real individual lives as they affect academic performance been so clearly presented.
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Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics

Rhetorical Invention: The Construction of Negotiated Meaning The heartbeat of the community think tank's rhetorical activity is the constructive process of ...

Author: Elenore Long

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN: 9781602353190

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 316

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Offering a comparative analysis of “community-literacy studies," Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Local Publics traces common values in diverse accounts of “ordinary people going public.” Elenore Long offers a five-point theoretical framework. Used to review major community-literacy projects that have emerged in recent years, this local public framework uncovers profound differences, with significant consequence, within five formative perspectives: 1) the guiding metaphor behind such projects; 2) the context that defines a “local” public, shaping what is an effective, even possible performance, 3) the tenor and affective register of the discourse; 4) the literate practices that shape the discourse; and, most signficantly, 5) the nature of rhetorical invention or the generative process by which people in these accounts respond to exigencies, such as getting around gatekeepers, affirming identities, and speaking out with others across difference.
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Teaching Academic Literacy

These decisionmaking points are part of a larger theory of negotiated meaning (Flower, The Construction of Negotiated Meaning 36–84) that can bring into ...

Author: Katherine L. Weese

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135681753

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 248

View: 931

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Teaching Academic Literacy provides a unique outlook on a first-year writing program's evolution by bringing together a group of related essays that analyze, from various angles, how theoretical concepts about writing actually operate in real students' writing. Based on the beginning writing program developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a course that asks students to consider what it means to be a literate member of a community, the essays in the collection explore how students become (and what impedes their progress in becoming) authorities in writing situations. Key features of this volume include: * demonstrations of how research into specific teaching problems (e.g., the problem of authority in beginning writers' work) can be conducted by examining student work through a variety of lenses such as task interpretation, collaboration, and conference, so that instructors can understand what factors influence students, and can then use what they have learned to reshape their teaching practices; * adaptability of theory and research to develop a course that engages basic writers with challenging ideas; * a model of how a large writing program can be administered, particularly in regards to the integration of research and curriculum development; and * integration of literary and composition theories.
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Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Public Engagement

This argument is worked out in The Construction of Negotiated Meaning: A Social Cognitive Theory of Writing (Flower, 1994, chapters 2 and 3). 2o.

Author: Linda Flower

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809328526

Category: Education

Page: 281

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Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Public Engagement explores the critical practice of intercultural inquiry and rhetorical problem-solving that encourages urban writers and college mentors alike to take literate action. Author Linda Flower documents an innovative experiment in community literacy, the Community Literacy Center in Pittsburgh, and posits a powerful and distinctively rhetorical model of community engagement and pedagogy for both marginalized and privileged writers and speakers. In addition, she articulates a theory of local publics and explores the transformative potential of alternative discourses and counter-public performances. In presenting a comprehensive pedagogy for literate action, the volume offers strategies for talking and collaborating across difference, forconducting an intercultural inquiry that draws out situated knowledge and rival interpretations of shared problems, and for writing and speaking to advocate for personal and public transformation. Flower describes the competing scripts for social engagement, empowerment, public deliberation, and agency that characterize the interdisciplinary debate over models of social engagement. Extending the Community Literacy Center’s initial vision of community literacy first published a decade ago, Community Literacy and the Rhetoric of Public Engagement makes an important contribution to theoretical conversations about the nature of the public sphere while providing practical instruction in how all people can speak publicly for values and visions of change. Winner, 2009 Rhetoric Society of America Book Award
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Meanings of War and Peace

Patterns in Meaning: Reflections on Meaning and Truth in Cultural Reality. ... Flower, L. 1994. The Construction of Negotiated Meaning: A Social REFERENCES I9I.

Author: Francis A. Beer

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1585441244

Category: Political Science

Page: 215

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When the stakes of public words and actions are global and permanent, and especially when they involve war and peace, can we afford not to seek their meaning? For three decades, Francis Beer has pioneered the effort to discover, describe, and connect pieces of the complex puzzle of war, peace, their interrelationship, and their causes. In this volume, Beer (joined by colleagues as co-authors of some chapters) examines the cognitive, behavioral, and linguistic dimensions of war and peace. Language, he shows, is important because it mediates between thought and action. It expresses beliefs about war and peace and affects the perceptions of potential adversaries about one's own intentions. Using multiple perspectives and methods, he explores the uses of communication in international relations and the development of "meaning" for war and peace. In this unique and innovative post-realist analysis, Beer examines how language transmits and creates meaning through interaction with specific audiences. His case studies include the Somalian intervention, Sarajevo and the Balkan conflict, and the Gulf War. Moving beyond the discrete words of war, the book takes a broader view of how political participants interact in war and peace through continuous streams of communication that reflect and construct worlds of meaning. This stimulating and challenging volume brings together insights and evidence from political science, cognitive psychology, linguistics, history, and rhetorical studies and applies them in a focused way to the problem of war and peace.
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Meaning Language and Time

The construction of purpose in writing and reading. College English, 50, 528–550. —. (1994). The construction of negotiated meaning: A social cognitive ...

Author: Kevin J. Porter

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN: 9781602359338

Category: Philosophy

Page: 424

View: 171

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Given the history of concepts like meaning, time, language, and discourse, any serious attempt to understand them must be interdisciplinary; so MEANING, LANGUAGE, AND TIME draws on a wide range of important work in the history of philosophy, rhetoric, and composition. In this groundbreaking work, Porter joins these conversations with the aim of breaching the traditional disciplinary walls and opening new areas of inquiry.
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Dialectical Rhetoric

In The Construction of Negotiated Meaning, Flower (1995) describes a ... as a means to negotiate a new orientation toward writing theory and practice, ...

Author: Bruce McComiskey

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781457195372

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 508

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In Dialectical Rhetoric, Bruce McComiskey argues that the historical conflict between rhetoric and dialectic can be overcome in ways useful to both composition theory and the composition classroom. Historically, dialectic has taken two forms in relation to rhetoric. First, it has been the logical development of linear propositions leading to necessary conclusions, a one-dimensional form that was the counterpart of rhetorics in which philosophical, metaphysical, and scientific truths were conveyed with as little cognitive interference from language as possible. Second, dialectic has been the topical development of opposed arguments on controversial issues and the judgment of their relative strengths and weaknesses, usually in political and legal contexts, a two-dimensional form that was the counterpart of rhetorics in which verbal battles over competing probabilities in public institutions revealed distinct winners and losers. The discipline of writing studies is on the brink of developing a new relationship between dialectic and rhetoric, one in which dialectics and rhetorics mediate and negotiate different arguments and orientations that are engaged in any rhetorical situation. This new relationship consists of a three-dimensional hybrid art called “dialectical rhetoric,” whose method is based on five topoi: deconstruction, dialogue, identification, critique, and juxtaposition. Three-dimensional dialectical rhetorics function effectively in a wide variety of discursive contexts, including digital environments, since they can invoke contrasts in stagnant contexts and promote associations in chaotic contexts. Dialectical Rhetoric focuses more attention on three-dimensional rhetorics from the rhetoric and composition community.
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Learning to Rival

A Strong RH Stance Constructs Negotiated Meanings Inquiry invites plurality and ... but because plurality points us to the construction of more complex, ...

Author: Linda Flower

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135658304

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 344

View: 769

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Learning to Rival tells the inside story of college and high school writers learning to "rival"--to actively seek rival hypotheses and negotiate alternative perspectives on charged questions. It shows how this interdisciplinary literate practice alters with the context of use and how, in learning to rival in school and out, students must often negotiate conflicts not apparent to instructors. This study of the rival hypothesis stance--a powerful literate practice claimed by both humanities and science--initially posed two questions: * how does the rival hypothesis stance define itself as a literate practice as we move across the boundaries of disciplines and genres, of school and community? * how do learners crossing these boundaries interpret and use the family of literate practices, especially in situations that pose problems of intercultural understanding? Over the course of this project with urban teenagers and minority college students, the rival hypothesis stance emerged as a generative and powerful tool for intercultural inquiry, posing in turn a new question: how can the practice of rivaling support the difficult and essential art of intercultural interpretation in education? The authors present the story of a literate practice that moves across communities, as well as the stories of students who are learning to rival across the curriculum. Learning to Rival offers an active, strategic approach to multiculturalism, addressing how people negotiate and use difference to solve problems. In the spirit of John Dewey's experimental way of knowing, it presents a multifaceted approach to literacy research, combining contemporary research methods to show the complexity of rivaling as a literate practice and the way it is understood and used by a variety of writers. As a resource for scholars, teachers, and administrators in writing across the curriculum studies, writing program administration, service learning, and community based projects, as well as literacy, rhetoric, and composition, this volume reveals how learning a new literate practice can force students to encounter and negotiate conflicts. It also provides a model of an intercultural inquiry that uses difference to understand a shared problem.
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Composition in the Twenty first Century

... am calling a negotiated meaning of literacy ( Flower , The Construction ) . Negotiation means that in the face of a contested meaning , writers rise to ...

Author: Lynn Z. Bloom

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809321289

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 306

View: 436

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The essays in this book, stemming from a national conference of the same name, focus on the single subject required of nearly all college students-- composition. Despite its pervasiveness and its significance, composition has an unstable status within the curriculum. Writing programs and writing faculty are besieged by academic, political, and financial concerns that have not been well understood or addressed. At many institutions, composition functions paradoxically as both the gateway to academic success and as the gatekeeper, reducing access to academic work and opportunity for those with limited facility in English. Although writing programs are expected to provide services that range from instruction in correct grammar to assisting-- or resisting-- political correctness, expanding programs and shrinking faculty get caught in the crossfire. The bottom line becomes the firing line as forces outside the classroom determine funding and seek to define what composition should do. In search of that definition, the contributors ask and answer a series of specific and salient questions: What implications-- intellectual, political, and institutional-- will forces outside the classroom have on the quality and delivery of composition in the twenty-first century? How will faculty and administrators identify and address these issues? What policies and practices ought we propose for the century to come? This book features sixteen position papers by distinguished scholars and researchers in composition and rhetoric; most of the papers are followed by invited responses by other notable compositionists. In all, twenty-five contributors approach composition from a wide variety of contemporary perspectives: rhetorical, historical, social, cultural, political, intellectual, economic, structural, administrative, and developmental. They propose solutions applicable to pedagogy, research, graduate training of composition teachers, academic administration, and public and social policy. In a very real sense, then, this is the only book to offer a map to the future of composition.
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Encyclopedia of Language and Education

1995, The Discourse of Negotiation. Studies of Language in the Workplace, Pergamon, Oxford. Flower, L.: 1994, The Construction of Negotiated Meaning.

Author: G. Richard Tucker

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401144193

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 482

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The contributions to the volume examine in detail diverse aspects of second language education, ranging from a focus on the basic contributions of linguistic theory and research to our understanding of second language learning and teaching on the one hand, to a series of reviews of innovative language education practices in selected regions of the world on the other.
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Second Language Education

1995 , The Discourse of Negotiation . Studies of Language in the Workplace , Pergamon , Oxford . Flower , L .: 1994 , The Construction of Negotiated Meaning ...

Author: G. Richard Tucker

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0792346408

Category: Education

Page: 255

View: 974

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The contributions to the volume examine in detail diverse aspects of second language education, ranging from a focus on the basic contributions of linguistic theory and research to our understanding of second language learning and teaching on the one hand, to a series of reviews of innovative language education practices in selected regions of the world on the other.
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Retuning Culture

Reflecting individual concerns of valued members of the community , a continual process of constructing negotiated meaning takes place .

Author: Mark Slobin

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822318474

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 216

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As a measure of individual and collective identity, music offers both striking metaphors and tangible data for understanding societies in transition—and nowhere is this clearer than in the recent case of the Eastern Bloc. Retuning Culture presents an extraordinary picture of this phenomenon. This pioneering set of studies traces the tumultuous and momentous shifts in the music cultures of Central and Eastern Europe from the first harbingers of change in the 1970s through the revolutionary period of 1989–90 to more recent developments. During the period of state socialism, both the reinterpretation of the folk music heritage and the domestication of Western forms of music offered ways to resist and redefine imposed identities. With the removal of state control and support, music was free to channel and to shape emerging forms of cultural identity. Stressing both continuity and disjuncture in a period of enormous social and cultural change, this volume focuses on the importance and evolution of traditional and popular musics in peasant communities and urban environments in Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, the Czech Republic, Ukraine, the former Yugoslavia, Macedonia, and Bulgaria. Written by longtime specialists in the region and considering both religious and secular trends, these essays examine music as a means of expressing diverse aesthetics and ideologies, participating in the formation of national identities, and strengthening ethnic affiliation. Retuning Culture provides a rich understanding of music’s role at a particular cultural and historical moment. Its broad range of perspectives will attract readers with interests in cultural studies, music, and Central and Eastern Europe. Contributors. Michael Beckerman, Donna Buchanan, Anna Czekanowska, Judit Frigyesi, Barbara Rose Lange, Mirjana Lausevic, Theodore Levin, Margarita Mazo, Steluta Popa, Ljerka Vidic Rasmussen, Timothy Rice, Carol Silverman, Catherine Wanner
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Experiencing the Apocalypse at the Limits of Alterity

For the reader, consequently, meaning construction can be an ongoing negotiation with the presence of other voices.139 While reading the Apocalypse, ...

Author: Leif Hongisto

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004186804

Category: Religion

Page: 300

View: 261

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Making use of postclassical narratology this book proposes a reading experience of the Apocalypse that underlines the role of the reader or listener for meaning creation and interpretation, based on their own life experiences and the imagistic quality of the text.
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Perspectives on Rhetorical Invention

Getting to Yes : Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In . New York : Penguin , 1983 . Flower , Linda . The Construction of Negotiated Meaning : A Social ...

Author: Janet Atwill

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 1572332018

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 434

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Rhetorical invention--the discursive art of inquiry and discovery--has great significance in the history of spoken and written communication, dating back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Yet invention has received relatively little attention in recent discussions of rhetoric, writing, and communication. This collection of essays is the first book in years to focus on current research in rhetorical invention. The contributors include many well-established scholars, as well as new voices in the field. They reflect a variety of approaches and perspectives: theory, history, culture, politics, institutions, pedagogy, and community service. Several of the essays address the relationship between invention and postmodernism--some by refiguring invention, others by challenging postmodernism. Still other essays explore multicultural conceptions of invention, the civic function of invention and rhetoric, and the role of rhetorical invention in institutions and in comunity problem solving. Taken together, these essays provide a much-needed forum for ongoing study of rhetorical invention within the framework of recent developments in both scholarship and the culture at large. "If inventional research is to continue and flourish," notes Janice Lauer in her foreword, "it must remain sensitive to shifts in epistemology, ethics, and politics. The essays in this volume undertake this effort.." The Editors: Janet M. Atwill is associate professor of English at the University of Tennessee. The author of Rhetoric Reclaimed: Aristotle and the Liberal Arts Tradition and coauthor of Four Worlds of Writing: Inquiry and Action in Context and Writing: A College Handbook, she has published articles in Rhetoric Review, Encyclopedia of Rhetoric, and the Journal of Advanced Composition. Janice M. Lauer is Reece McGee Distinguished Professor of English at Purdue University, where she founded, directed, and teaches in the graduate program in Rhetoric and Composition. She is coauthor of Four Worlds of Writing and Composition Research: Empirical Designs and has published numerous articles on rhetoric and composition. Contributors: Frederick J. Antczak, Janet M. Atwill, Julia Deems, Richard Leo Enos, Theresa Enos, Linda Flower, Debra Hawhee, Janice M. Lauer, Donald Lazere, Yameng Liu, Arabella Lyon, Louise Wetherbee Phelps, Jay Satterfield, Haixia Wang, Mark T. Williams.
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Theorizing Composition

With this changing emphasis, Flower (for example, in The Construction of Negotiated Meaning) has extended her early composing model to better account for ...

Author: Mary Lynch Kennedy

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313299277

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 405

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The last 25 years have witnessed extraordinary growth in the field variously known as composition studies or as rhetoric and composition. What was noticeable about the field in its infancy was a preoccupation with practice, a lack of emphasis on theory, and an exclusive reliance on writing as a process. As its disciplinary status has grown, composition studies has expanded its focus, reconceptualized the writing process, and embraced a wide range of contemporary critical perspectives. This reference book is a guide to the numerous theories that now form the foundation for composition studies.
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Invention in Rhetoric and Composition

In 1994, Flower, in The Construction of Negotiated Meaning: A Social Cognitive Theory of Writing, further outlined a socio-cognitive theory of writing, ...

Author: Janice M. Lauer

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN: 193255906X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 257

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Invention in Rhetoric and Composition examines issues that have surrounded historical and contemporary theories and pedagogies of rhetorical invention, citing a wide array of positions on these issues in both primary rhetorical texts and secondary interpretations. It presents theoretical disagreements over the nature, purpose, and epistemology of invention and pedagogical debates over such issues as the relative importance of art, talent, imitation, and practice in teaching discourse. After a discussion of treatments of invention from the Sophists to the nineteenth century, Invention in Rhetoric and Composition introduces a range of early twentieth-century multidisciplinary theories and calls for invention's awakening in the field of English studies. It then showcases inventional theories and pedagogies that have emerged in the field of Rhetoric and Composition over the last four decades, including the ensuing research, critiques, and implementations of this inventional work. As a reference guide, the text offers a glossary of terms, an annotated bibliography of selected texts, and an extensive bibliography. Janice M. Lauer is Professor of English, Emerita at Purdue University, where she was the Reece McGee Distinguished Professor of English. In 1998, she received the College Composition and Communication Conference's Exemplar Award. Her publications include Four Worlds of Writing: Inquiry and Action in Context, Composition Research: Empirical Designs, and New Perspectives on Rhetorical Invention, as well as essays on rhetorical invention, disciplinarity, writing as inquiry, composition pedagogy, historical rhetoric, and empirical research.
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Rethinking Basic Writing

As Flower (1994) determined in The Construction of Negotiated Meaning: A Social Cognitive Theory of Writing, such theories “often combine strong claims ...

Author: Laura Gray-Rosendale

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135664183

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 179

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This book surveys the history of basic writing scholarship, suggesting that we cannot adequately theorize the situations of basic writers unless we examine how they construct their own conceptions of their identities, their constructions of their relationships to social forces, and their representations of their relationships to written work. Using a cross-disciplinary analytic model, Gray-Rosendale offers a detailed examination of the oral conversations that take place within one basic writing peer revision group. She explains the ways in which the students' own conversational structures impact and shape their written products. Gray-Rosendale then draws out the potentials of her work for basic writing administrators, curricula builders, and teachers.
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Music in American Religious Experience

Such negotiation is all the more significant in view of the fact that for individual ... It is precisely the process of constructing negotiated meaning, ...

Author: Philip V. Bohlman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199721382

Category: Music

Page: 368

View: 317

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Since the appearance of The Bay Psalm Book in 1640, music has served as a defining factor for American religious experience and has been of fundamental importance in the development of American identity and psyche. The essays in this long-awaited volume explore the diverse ways in which music shapes the distinctive presence of religion in the United States and address the fullness of music's presence in American religious history. Timely, challenging, and stimulating, this collection will appeal to students and scholars of American history, American studies, religious studies, theology, musicology, and ethnomusicology, as well as to practicing sacred musicians.
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Negotiated Meanings

... critiques of educational approaches , the development of a personal pedagogic style , and active dialogue toward the construction of meaning systems .

Author: David Edward Bair

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015041231013

Category:

Page:

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