The Cross and the Lynching Tree

In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk.

Author: James H. Cone

Publisher: Orbis Books

ISBN: 9781608330010

Category: Religion

Page: 202

View: 967

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A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era. In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.
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The Cross and the Lynching Tree

In this work, Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of African American folk.

Author: James H. Cone

Publisher:

ISBN: 1570759375

Category: Religion

Page: 202

View: 562

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The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this work, Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of African American folk.
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Black Suffering

Cone, The Cross and the Lynching Tree, 104. 23. Cone, The Cross and the Lynching Tree, 105. 24. Richard Pérez-Peña, “Woman Linked to 1955 Emmett Till Murder Tells Historian Her Claims Were False,” New York Times, January 27, 2017, ...

Author: James Henry Harris

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781506464398

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 931

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In Black Suffering, James Henry Harris explores the nexus of injustices, privations, and pains that contribute to the daily suffering seen and felt in the lives of Black folks. This suffering is so normalized in American life that it often goes unnoticed, unseen, and even--more often--purposely ignored. The reality of Black suffering is both omnipresent and complicated--both a reaction to and a result of the reality of white supremacy, its psychological and historical legacy, and its many insidious and fractured expressions within contemporary culture. Because Black suffering is so wholly disregarded, it must be named, discussed, and analyzed. Black Suffering articulates suffering as an everyday reality of Black life. Harris names suffering's many manifestations, both in history and in the present moment, and provides a unique portrait of the ways Black suffering has been understood by others. Drawing on decades of personal experience as a pastor, theologian, and educator, Harris gives voice to suffering's practical impact on church leaders as they seek to forge a path forward to address this huge and troubling issue. Black Suffering is both a mixtape and a call to consciousness, a work that identifies Black suffering, shines a light on the insidious normalization of the phenomenon, and begins a larger conversation about correcting the historical weight of suffering carried by Black people. The book combines elements of memoir, philosophy, historical analysis, literary criticism, sermonic discourse, and even creative nonfiction to present a "remix" of the suffering experienced daily by Black people.
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Afro Pentecostalism

identifying with “hanging and burning black bodies on the lynching tree”— in white supremacy made ugly.”26 Cone notes that the gospel of Jesus is an ugly story, but the cross and the lynching tree become “windows for seeing the among ...

Author: Amos Yong

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814789070

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 512

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In 2006, the contemporary American Pentecostal movement celebrated its 100th birthday. Over that time, its African American sector has been markedly influential, not only vis-a-vis other branches of Pentecostalism but also throughout the Christian church. Black Christians have been integrally involved in every aspect of the Pentecostal movement since its inception and have made significant contributions to its founding as well as the evolution of Pentecostal/charismatic styles of worship, preaching, music, engagement of social issues, and theology. Yet despite its being one of the fastest growing segments of the Black Church, Afro-Pentecostalism has not received the kind of critical attention it deserves. Afro-Pentecostalism brings together fourteen interdisciplinary scholars to examine different facets of the movement, including its early history, issues of gender, relations with other black denominations, intersections with popular culture, and missionary activities, as well as the movementOCOs distinctive theology. Bolstered by editorial introductions to each section, the chapters reflect on the state of the movement, chart its trajectories, discuss pertinent issues, and anticipate future developments. Contributors: Estrelda Y. Alexander, Valerie C. Cooper, David D. Daniels III, Louis B. Gallien, Jr., Clarence E. Hardy III, Dale T. Irvin, Ogbu U. Kalu, Leonard Lovett, Cecil M. Robeck, Jr., Cheryl J. Sanders, Craig Scandrett-Leatherman, William C. Turner, Jr., Frederick L. Ware, and Amos Yong
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God of the Oppressed

But a wider theme of the book is the role that social and historical context plays in framing the questions we address to God as well as the mode of the answers provided.

Author: James H. Cone

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105036380645

Category: African Americans

Page: 280

View: 435

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In his reflections on God, Jesus, suffering, and liberation, James H. Cone relates the gospel message to the experience of the black community. But a wider theme of the book is the role that social and historical context plays in framing the questions we address to God as well as the mode of the answers provided.
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Theology of the Cross

This work addresses a theology of the cross by comparing the work of Jürgen Moltmann and James Cone in which the cross, despite its association with violence, can be the ultimate symbol of hope for ecclesiology.

Author: Joseph Mukuna Nzeketha

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:925883133

Category: African Americans

Page: 59

View: 167

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This work addresses a theology of the cross by comparing the work of Jürgen Moltmann and James Cone in which the cross, despite its association with violence, can be the ultimate symbol of hope for ecclesiology. For Moltmann, the ecclesiological identity hinges on what Christian theology has to say about the suffering and crucifixion of Christ, and its relation to the human suffering. Moltmann moves beyond the anthropological question of "what the death of Christ means for us," to a more theological one of "what does the cross mean for God," and its relation to the human suffering. Cone's theology of the cross is informed by his socio-historical comparison of the cross and the lynching tree. These two symbols of death, affecting Christians' ability to live a more faithful witness, are separated by nearly two thousand years. One is a universal symbol of Christian faith, while the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. He juxtaposes the cross and the lynching tree as a theological conundrum requiring us to compare and contrast the crucifixion of Jesus with the Black people's lynching as the authenticity of Christian gospel if the church and society are to overcome the racial divide. Despite their differences in analysis, both Moltmann and Cone conclude that the cross can be a symbol of hope for ecclesiology. Thus, for contemporary Christians, the cross can become a symbol not only of sacrificial love but also of overcoming hatred.
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Black Theology and Black Power

-- The white church and black power -- Black power and American theology -- The black church before the Civil War -- The post-Civil War black church -- On black suffering -- On religious authority -- On eschatology -- On the creation of new ...

Author: Cone, James, H.

Publisher: Orbis Books

ISBN: 9781608337729

Category: Religion

Page:

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"The introduction to this edition by Cornel West was originally published in Dwight N. Hopkins, ed., Black Faith and Public Talk: Critical Essays on James H. Cone's Black Theology & Black Power (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1999; reprinted 2007 by Baylor University Press)."
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