The Gabriel Hounds

The first hound's voice rose in a throbbing wail, to be joined by the long tremolo of the ... the Gabriel Hounds, Death's pack hunting through the sky .

Author: Mary Stewart

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781444720556

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

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'A comfortable chair and a Mary Stewart: total heaven. I'd rather read her than most other authors.' Harriet Evans Legend has it that when the Gabriel Hounds run howling over the crumbling palace of Dar Ibrahim, high in the Adonis Valley of Lebanon, death will follow on their heels. When rich, spoilt Christie Mansel arrives at the decaying palace to look after her eccentric Aunt Harriet, she arrives to the sound of howling dogs. The palace is riddled with hidden passages and the servants are unwilling to let anyone see Harriet during the day. It seems the palace hides an extraordinary secret . . . one that somebody is willing to kill to keep. The deep blue oblong of sky above the open court was pricking already with brilliant stars. No ugly diffusion of city light spoiled the deep velvet of that sky; even hanging as it was above the glittering and crowded richness of the Damascus oasis, it spoke of the desert and the vast empty silence beyond the last palm tree.
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Zero History

Readers of Neal Stephenson, Ray Bradbury and Iain M. Banks will love this book. Zero History is the final novel in the Blue Ant trilogy - read Pattern Recognition and Spook Country for more.

Author: William Gibson

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141965703

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

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Former rock singer Hollis Henry has lost a lot of money in the crash, which means she can't turn down the offer of a job from Hubertus Bigend, sinister Belgian proprietor of mysterious ad agency Blue Ant. Milgrim is working for Bigend too. Bigend admires the ex-addict's linguistic skills and street knowledge so much that he's even paid for his costly rehab. So together Hollis and Milgrim are at the front line of Bigend's attempts to get a slice of the military budget, and they gradually realize he has some very dangerous competitors. Which is not a great thought when you don't much trust your boss either. Gibson's new novel, set largely in London, spookily captures the paranoia and fear of our post-Crash times.
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Fairies Ghosts King Arthur and Hounds from Hell

HELL HOUNDS The Gabriel Hounds of The Lower Calder Valley Gabriel Hounds, or Ratchets, have been known since the 17th century68.

Author: Robin Melrose

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781838595814

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

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Britain has a rich folklore, and the most fascinating figures in British folkore are undoubtedly fairies, who were first described in the Middle Ages, but were most fully analysed by 19th century Victorians, who were clearly intrigued by them.
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The Living Age

They are frequently very noisy For overhead are sweeping Gabriel's hounds , Doomed with their impious lord the flying sound has been compared to that of a pack of hounds in full cry . Reverting , howhart To chase forever on aërial ...

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ISBN: CHI:55226585

Category: Literature

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The Galaxy

I have heard THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . Mr. Coventry and Grace looked at one another , and then inquired , almost in a breath , what the Gabriel hounds were . “ A strange thing in the air that is said , in these parts , to foretell calamity .

Author: William Conant Church

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015013754638

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The Galaxy

I have heard THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . Mr. Coventry and Grace looked at one another , and then inquired , almost in a breath , what the Gabriel hounds were . “ A strange thing in the air that is said , in these parts , to foretell calamity .

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ISBN: STANFORD:36105119091002

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Notes on the Folk lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders

THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . 129 But to proceed . We can scarcely be surprised that lonely walks among the wild hills and cheerless moors of the North should be attended by superstitious fears , or that the strange unearthly cries , so like the ...

Author: William Henderson

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:39000005811034

Category: England

Page: 391

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Publications of the Folk lore Society

THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . 129 But to proceed . We can scarcely be surprised that lonely walks among the wild hills and cheerless moors of the North should be attended by superstitious fears , or that the strange unearthly cries , so like the ...

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ISBN: UCBK:B000769428

Category: Folklore

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Notes on the folk lore of the Northern countries of England and the borders

THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . 129 But to proceed . We can scarcely be surprised that lonely walks among the wild hills and cheerless moors of the North should be attended by superstitious fears , or that the strange unearthly cries , so like the ...

Author: William Henderson

Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB11388850

Category: Folklore

Page: 391

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Rustic Speech and Folk Lore

Gabriel's Hounds The Gabriel Ratchets, Gabble Raches, or Gabriel's Hounds (n.Cy. Yks. Lan. Stf. Der.) are spectre dogs whose yelping cry may be heard at ...

Author: Elizabeth Mary Wright

Publisher: OXFORD: HORACE HART

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 184

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Example in this ebook Under the heading of ‘The Varieties of English Speech’ an article of mine appeared in The Quarterly Review of July, 1907. The favourable reception accorded to it at the time prompted me to embark forthwith on a larger work dealing with the same subject. Many books both scientific and popular have been written concerning dialect speech and lore, but nearly all of them are special investigations of some particular dialect. I have taken a bolder flight than this. I have not given a detailed account of any one dialect, but I have surveyed them all, and have gathered words, phrases, names, superstitions, and popular customs, here and there, wherever I found something that appealed to me, and that I felt would appeal to others as well as myself. It was impossible to make any one category exhaustive, for such was the mass of material open to me for selection, I might say I was ‘fairly betwattled and baffounded’. The only thing to be done was to make my selections fairly representative of the whole. My aim in dealing with the linguistic side of my subject has been to show that rules for pronunciation and syntax are not the monopoly of educated people who have been taught to preach as well as practise them. Dialect-speaking people obey sound-laws and grammatical rules even more faithfully than we do, because theirs is a natural and unconscious obedience. Some writers of literary English seem to enjoy flinging jibes at dialect on the assumption that any deviation from the standard speech must be due to ignorance, if not to vulgarity besides. Since I wrote the last chapter of this book, I read in a criticism of Stanley Houghton’s Play Trust the People, this sentence describing the Lancashire ‘father an old mill-hand and the homely mother to match’: ‘They are both drawn, you feel, to the life, and talk with ease, not to say gusto, that curious lingo which seems to an outsider mainly distinguished by its contemptuous neglect of the definite article’, The Times, Friday, Feb. 7, 1913. Now the definite article in north-west Lancashire is t, in the south-west and south t, or th, and in mid and south-east Lancashire th. When this t stands before a consonant, and more especially before a dental such as t, d, it is not by any means easy for the uninitiated to detect the difference in sound between the simple word and the same word preceded by the article, between, for example, table and t table, or dog and t dog. But this is not ‘contemptuous neglect’ on the part of the Lancastrian! It would be nearer the mark to say that the Lancashire dialect is characterized by its retention of a form of the definite article very difficult to pronounce in certain combinations. Further, I have endeavoured to show by means of numerous illustrations, how full the dialects are of words and phrases remarkable not only for their force and clearness, but often also for their subtle beauty, that satisfying beauty of the thing exactly fitted to its purpose. I have also drawn up lists showing the numbers of old words and phrases once common in English literature, still existing in the dialects. Occasionally writers of modern verse seek to restore some of the words of this type to their former position in literary English, thereby causing the reviewer to stumble dreadfully, though he thinketh he standeth. I quote the following from a literary periodical dated May 2, 1913: ‘He debates if he shall make “a nest within a reedy brake”, or, failing this delectable situation, offers himself a quaint alternative, Or I shall see with quiet eye, The dappled paddock loping by. We had always supposed in our ignorance that “paddock” was a term applied to green fields or pastures. How Mr. ... could have seen a paddock “lope” we do not know, and perhaps it would not be kind to ask him to explain.’ To be continue in this ebook
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Understanding William Gibson

The viral dissemination of the Gabriel Hounds line demonstrates how virtual patterns can actualize themselves in radical forms of difference.

Author: Gerald Alva Miller, Jr.

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781611176346

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 168

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Gerald Alva Miller Jr.’s Understanding William Gibson is a thoughtful examination of the life and work of William Gibson, author of eleven novels and twenty short stories. Gibson is the recipient of many notable awards for science fiction writing including the Nebula, Hugo, and Philip K. Dick awards. Gibson’s iconic novel, Neuromancer, popularized the concept of cyberspace. With his early stories and his first trilogy of novels,Gibson became the father figure for a new genre of science fiction called “cyberpunk” that brought a gritty realism to its cerebral plots involving hackers and artificial intelligences. This study situates Gibson as a major figure in both science fiction history and contemporary American fiction, and it traces how his aesthetic affected both areas of literature. Miller follows a brief biographical sketch and a survey of the works that influenced him with an examination that divides Gibson’s body of work into early stories, his three major novel trilogies, and his standalone works. Miller does not confine his study to major works but instead also delves into Gibson’s obscure stories, published and unpublished screenplays, major essays, and collaborations with other authors. Miller’s exploration starts by connecting Gibson to the major countercultural movements that influenced him (the Beat Generation, the hippies, and the punk rock movement) while also placing him within the history of science fiction and examining how his early works reacted against contemporaneous trends in the genre. These early works also exhibit the development of his unique aesthetic that would influence science fiction and literature more generally. Next a lengthy chapter explicates his groundbreaking Sprawl Trilogy, which began with Neuromancer. Miller then traces Gibson’s aesthetic transformations across his two subsequent novel trilogies that increasingly eschew distant futures either to focus on our contemporary historical moment as a kind of science fiction itself or to imagine technological singularities that might lie just around the corner. These chapters detail how Gibson’s aesthetic has morphed along with social, cultural, and technological changes in the real world. The study also looks at such standalone works as his collaborative steampunk novel, his attempts at screenwriting, his major essays, and even his experimental hypertext poetry. The study concludes with a discussion of Gibson’s lasting influence and a brief examination of his most recent novel, The Peripheral, which signals yet another radical change in Gibson’s aesthetic.
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The Gentleman s Magazine and Historical Review

Lingard ; but a strict adherence to his- 7 , Walworth Street , Sunderland , toric truth leaves me no other alternative . June 16th , 1866 . THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . 2. MR . URBAN , - Mr. Hylten Caval- So , also , in the “ Leeds Glossary ...

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ISBN: PRNC:32101074718113

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The Cornhill Magazine

I have heard THE GABRIEL HOUNDS . " Mr. Coventry and Grace looked at one another , and then inquired , almost in a breath , what the Gabriel hounds were . " A strange thing in the air that is said , in these parts , to foretell calamity ...

Author: William Makepeace Thackeray

Publisher:

ISBN: PRNC:32101076403219

Category: Electronic journals

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Notes on the Folk lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders With an Appendix on Household Stories by S Baring Gould

And oftentimes will start , For overhead are sweeping Gabriel's hounds , Doomed with their impious lord the flying hart To chase for ever on aërial grounds . In Devonshire the spectral pack is called the “ Wisht hounds , ' a name which ...

Author: William Henderson

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433068188469

Category: England, Northern

Page: 344

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Bye gones Relating to Wales and the Border Counties

John Phillips , author of Folk Etymology ( 1882 ) , speaking of reotor ; first lesson by Dr. Holden of Durham , the origin of the name " Gabriel Hounds , " second lesson by the Rey . Hubert MoLaughlin , given to the “ Seven Whistlers ...

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ISBN: PRNC:32101066154319

Category: Wales

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