The Ossetic Language

In this series, Iranian languages and linguistics take centre stage. Each volume is dedicated to a key topic and brings together leading experts from around the globe.

Author: Oleg Belyaev

Publisher: De Gruyter Mouton

ISBN: 3110637685

Category:

Page: 720

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Ossetic is the last living descendant of the Scytho-Sarmatian group of Iranian languages. It goes back to the language of the Alans, who, in the first centuries A.D., created a kingdom in the area to the north of the Caucasus which existed until the 13-14th centuries, when it was wiped out by the Mongol and Timurid invasions. The surviving Alans fled to the highlands, where they became known to the outside world under their Georgian-based exonym "Ossetians". Since Ossetians have long existed in isolation from the rest of the Iranian world, their language has a unique status among Iranian languages. On the one hand, it has preserved a number of archaic morphological, phonological, and syntactic features, for example, a complex system of oblique moods. On the other hand, due to centuries of close contact of Ossetians with speakers of indigenous languages of the Caucasus, Ossetic has developed some innovative traits, for example, a rich agglutinative case system with several spatial forms. The knowledge of Ossetic is thus indispensable not only for comparative work on Iranian languages, but also for the typology of language contact and for the study of the Caucasian linguistic area. This volume for the first time brings together specialist contributions that present the state-of-the-art of modern scholarship on Ossetic.
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Studies in the Historical Development of the Ossetic Vocalism

The book is a contribution not only to our understanding of Ossetic itself but also to the advancement of Iranian and Caucasian studies.

Author: Johnny Cheung

Publisher: Reichert Verlag

ISBN: UOM:39015055205846

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 331

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Ossetic is an archaic Iranian language, which is primarily spoken by roughly a half million people in the Caucasus. Nowadays fully surrounded by non-Iranian peoples, the speakers of Ossetic are the last descendants of those North Iranian tribes, such as Cimmerians, Scythians, Saka, Sarmatians and Alans, who used to roam the vast Eurasian steppes. It is for this reason that Ossetic contains a wealth of information which attests to their historical contacts with many and ethnically very diverse groups, like Caucasians, Finno-Ugrians, Slavs, Goths, Greeks, Turks and Mongols. Despite its isolation and recent attestation, the language has essentially kept its Iranian character, moreover, being in appearance at least as conservative as a Middle Iranian language, such as Sogdian, Chorasmian or Khotanese. In the present work a comprehensive account of some important developments which took place in the phonology of that language is given. The developments comprise apocope (loss of final vowel), syncope (loss of medial vowel), aphaeresis (loss of initial vowel), i-epenthesis (insertion of *i) and accompanying palatalization, and finally, the fate of *u. Also the role of the accent in these cases is addressed. None of these developments has been subjected to a systematic treatment before. The book also contains a valuable contribution to etymology, as for this research Ossetic words are gleaned and assessed from the monumental work of the eminent scholar Vasilij Abaev, Historical-Etymological Dictionary of the Ossetic language. Finally, morphology is also touched upon in an extensive appendix, in which several nominal suffixes and the verbal endings are treated. The book is a contribution not only to our understanding of Ossetic itself but also to the advancement of Iranian and Caucasian studies.
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The Ossetes

This is the first book devoted to the little-known history and culture of the Ossetes to appear in any Western language.

Author: Richard Foltz

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780755618460

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 996

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The Ossetes, a small nation inhabiting two adjacent states in the central Caucasus, are the last remaining linguistic and cultural descendants of the ancient nomadic Scythians who dominated the Eurasian steppe from the Balkans to Mongolia for well over one thousand years. A nominally Christian nation speaking a language distantly related to Persian, the Ossetes have inherited much of the culture of the medieval Alans who brought equestrian culture to Europe. They have preserved a rich oral literature through the epic of the Narts, a body of heroic legends that shares much in common with the Persian Book of Kings and other works of Indo-European mythology. This is the first book devoted to the little-known history and culture of the Ossetes to appear in any Western language. Charting Ossetian history from Antiquity to today, it will be a vital contribution to the fields of Iranian, Caucasian, Post-Soviet and Indo-European Studies.
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Oral Literature of Iranian Languages Kurdish Pashto Balochi Ossetic Persian and Tajik Companion Volume II

†FRIDRIK THORDARSON Ossetic 1 is an Iranian language spoken by about half a million people in the central regions of the Caucasus, mainly in the North Ossetic Republic (“Alania”) of the Russian Federation, but also in the South Ossetic ...

Author: Ulrich Marzolph

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780857732651

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 432

View: 578

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A new History of Persian Literature in 18 Volumes. Persian literature is the jewel in the crown of Persian culture. It has profoundly influenced the literatures of Ottoman Turkey, Muslim India and Turkic Central Asia and been a source of inspiration for Goethe, Emerson, Matthew Arnold and Jorge Luis Borges among others. Yet Persian literature has never received the attention it truly deserves. A History of Persian Literature answers this need and offers a new, comprehensive and detailed history of its subject. This 18-volume, authoritative survey reflects the stature and significance of Persian literature as the single most important accomplishment of the Iranian experience. It includes extensive, revealing examples with contributions by prominent scholars who bring a fresh critical approach to bear on this important topic. This companion volume deals with two of the most under-researched areas of study in the Modern Iranian field: the Persian oral and popular literature of Iran, Tajikistan and Persian-speaking Afghanistan on the one hand; and the written and oral literatures of the Kurds, Pashtuns, Baloch and Ossetians on the other.
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The Oxford Handbook of Language Contact

In this section, I will provide a general overview of what is known on the history and historical sociolinguistics of the Ossetic language. Before starting this account, a brief introduction to the ...

Author: Anthony P. Grant

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190876906

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 864

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Every language has been influenced in some way by other languages. In many cases, this influence is reflected in words which have been absorbed from other languages as the names for newer items or ideas, such as perestroika, manga, or intifada (from Russian, Japanese, and Arabic respectively). In other cases, the influence of other languages goes deeper, and includes the addition of new sounds, grammatical forms, and idioms to the pre-existing language. For example, English's structure has been shaped in such a way by the effects of Norse, French, Latin, and Celtic--though English is not alone in its openness to these influences. Any features can potentially be transferred from one language to another if the sociolinguistic and structural circumstances allow for it. Further, new languages--pidgins, creoles, and mixed languages--can come into being as the result of language contact. In thirty-three chapters, The Oxford Handbook of Language Contact examines the various forms of contact-induced linguistic change and the levels of language which have provided instances of these influences. In addition, it provides accounts of how language contact has affected some twenty languages, spoken and signed, from all parts of the world. Chapters are written by experts and native-speakers from years of research and fieldwork. Ultimately, this Handbook provides an authoritative account of the possibilities and products of contact-induced linguistic change.
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The Oxford Handbook of Languages of the Caucasus

Currently both Ossetic languages are taught in schools only as subjects; the main language of instruction is Russian. To communicate between each other, Digor and Iron speakers use Russian. Both Iron and Digor have Cyrillic-based ...

Author: Maria Polinsky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190690717

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 600

View: 421

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The Oxford Handbook of Languages of the Caucasus is an introduction to and overview of the linguistically diverse languages of southern Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia. Though the languages of the Caucasus have often been mischaracterized or exoticized, many of them have cross-linguistically rare features found in few or no other languages. This handbook presents facts and descriptions of the languages written by experts. The first half of the book is an introduction to the languages, with the linguistic profiles enriched by demographic research about their speakers. It features overviews of the main language families as well as detailed grammatical descriptions of several individual languages. The second half of the book delves more deeply into theoretical analyses of features, such as agreement, ellipsis, and discourse properties, which are found in some languages of the Caucasus. Promising areas for future research are highlighted throughout the handbook, which will be of interest to linguists of all subfields.
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The Ossetes

While Ossetes have gained in many ways from their long association with Russia, the benefits have come at a cost. Most apparent is the steady decline of the Ossetian language. Vladikavkaz, by far the largest Ossetian city and home to ...

Author: Richard Foltz

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780755618477

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 273

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The Ossetes, a small nation inhabiting two adjacent states in the central Caucasus, are the last remaining linguistic and cultural descendants of the ancient nomadic Scythians who dominated the Eurasian steppe from the Balkans to Mongolia for well over one thousand years. A nominally Christian nation speaking a language distantly related to Persian, the Ossetes have inherited much of the culture of the medieval Alans who brought equestrian culture to Europe. They have preserved a rich oral literature through the epic of the Narts, a body of heroic legends that shares much in common with the Persian Book of Kings and other works of Indo-European mythology. This is the first book devoted to the little-known history and culture of the Ossetes to appear in any Western language. Charting Ossetian history from Antiquity to today, it will be a vital contribution to the fields of Iranian, Caucasian, Post-Soviet and Indo-European Studies.
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The Languages and Linguistics of Western Asia

Moreover, one salient feature of many Caucasian languages ‒ namely, the presence of ergative marking, is entirely absent from Ossetic. It seems more promising to conjecture that possessive proclitics, the structure of wh-questions, ...

Author: Geoffrey Haig

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110421682

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 986

View: 277

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The languages of Western Asia belong to a variety of language families, including Indo-European, Kartvelian, Semitic, and Turkic, but share numerous features on account of being in areal contact over many centuries. This volume presents descriptions of the modern languages, contributed by leading specialists, and evaluates similarities across the languages that may have arisen by areal contact. It begins with an introductory chapter presenting an overview of the various genetic groupings in the region and summarizing some of the significant features and issues relating to language contact. In the core of the volume the presentation of the languages is divided into five contact areas, which include (i) eastern Anatolia and northwestern Iran, (ii) northern Iraq, (iii) western Iran, (iv) the Caspian region and south Azerbaijan, and (v) the Caucasian rim and southern Black Sea coast. Each section contains chapters devoted to the languages of the area preceded by an introductory section that highlights significant contact phenomena. The volume is rounded off by an appendix with basic lexical items across a selection of the languages. The handbook features contributions by Erik Anonby, Denise Bailey, Christiane Bulut, David Erschler, Geoffrey Haig, Geoffrey Khan, Rene Lacroix, Parvin Mahmoudveysi, Hrach Martirosyan, Ludwig Paul, Stephan Procházka, Laurentia Schreiber, Don Stilo, Mortaza Taheri-Ardali, Christina van der Wal Anonby.
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Transactions of the Philological Society

571-652 ) , his ' Ossetische Studien , with special reference to the Indo - European Languages ' — first part ... there appeared in the Transactions of the Berlin Academy a treatise by Dr. George Rosen on the Ossetic Language ( pp .

Author: Philological Society

Publisher:

ISBN: ONB:+Z287746205

Category:

Page:

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Trends in Iranian and Persian Linguistics

information on the Ossetic language and clarify the sources of my data. ... Section 10 shows that none of other Iranian languages and almost none of the Caucasian languages geographically close to Ossetic have dedicated grammatical ...

Author: Alireza Korangy

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110453591

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 380

View: 418

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This set of essays highlights the state of the art in the linguistics of Iranian languages. The contributions span the full range of linguistic inquiry, including pragmatics, syntax, semantics, phonology/phonetics, lexicography, historical linguistics and poetics and covering a wide set of Iranian languages including Persian, Balochi, Kurdish and Ossetian. This book will engage both the active scholar in the field as well as linguists from other fields seeking to assess the latest developments in Iranian linguistics.
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