The Solitary Self

Individuality in the Ancrene Wisse
Author: Linda Georgianna
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674817517
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 169
View: 5007
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The Ancrene Wisse is a spiritual guide forfemale recluses, written at the request ofthree young anchoresses who were voluntarily enclosed for life within small cells. Withrare sensitivity and discernment, LindaGeorgianna analyzes this complex and skillfully composed treatise and examines its detailed portrayal of the rich, sometimes rewarding and sometimes frustrating innerlife of the solitary. Georgianna sees inthe author's practical and spiritual counsel,ranging from advice on owning a cat to theconfession of sin, an assumption that exterior and interior realities are inextricablybound in the solitary life, which becomes a highly self-conscious journey through human experience. The Solitary Self offers both a reading of this linguistically difficult text and a study of those contemporary intellectual and cultural concerns--particularly the widespread interest in the psychology of sin, confession, and repentance--which help to explain the Ancrene Wisse author's insistence upon self-awareness and individuality in the solitary life.

The Solitary Self

Darwin and the Selfish Gene
Author: Mary Midgley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317488237
Category: Philosophy
Page: 176
View: 6984
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Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does not derive from Darwin but from a wider, Hobbesian tradition in Enlightenment thinking. She reveals the selfish gene hypothesis as a cultural accretion that is just not seen in nature. Heroic independence is not a realistic aim for Homo sapiens. We are, as Darwin saw, earthly organisms, framed to interact constantly with one another and with the complex ecosystems of which we are a tiny part. For us, bonds are not just restraints but also lifelines.

The Solitary Self

Jean-Jacques Rousseau in Exile and Adversity
Author: Maurice Cranston,Sanford Lakoff
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226118659
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 247
View: 4050
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In this third and final volume of his masterly biography, Maurice Cranston traces the last tempestuous years of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's life. From his brilliant authorship of the Confessions, the Dialogues, and the Reveries to his controversial religious views, from his notorious public quarrel with David Hume in England to his clandestine return to France, from his unsettled wanderings to his death in 1778 - these and other critical events in Rousseau's most embattled years are detailed in this sympathetic yet balanced portrait. In 1762, with the condemnation of Emile and The Social Contract harried by both church and state, Rousseau fled Paris, seeking refuge in Neuchatel and England. Deemed a social outcast and beset by feelings of persecution and abuse, not wholly unwarranted, the philosopher turned in despair to the production of autobiographical works intended to reveal his essential innocence and integrity. Through this bitter introspection, Rousseau transformed his solitude into some of the most enduring literature of his time.

Shakespeare and the Solitary Man


Author: Janette Dillon
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349049964
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 183
View: 6684
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Reveries of the Solitary Walker


Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau,Russell Goulbourne
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199563276
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 123
View: 5598
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Part reminiscence, part meditation, Reveries of the Solitary Walker is Rousseau's last great work, the enduring testimony of an alienated person seeking self-knowledge. As he records his walks round Paris, he finds happiness in solitude and nature. The new translation includes an introduction and notes that explore the work and its contexts.

Bearing the Dead

The British Culture of Mourning from the Enlightenment to Victoria
Author: Esther Schor
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400821488
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 256
View: 557
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Esther Schor tells us about the persistence of the dead, about why they still matter long after we emerge from grief and accept our loss. Mourning as a cultural phenomenon has become opaque to us in the twentieth century, Schor argues. This book is an effort to recover the culture of mourning that thrived in English society from the Enlightenment through the Romantic Age, and to recapture its meaning. Mourning appears here as the social diffusion of grief through sympathy, as a force that constitutes communities and helps us to conceptualize history. In the textual and social practices of the British Enlightenment and its early nineteenth-century heirs, Schor uncovers the ways in which mourning mediated between received ideas of virtue, both classical and Christian, and a burgeoning, property-based commercial society. The circulation of sympathies maps the means by which both valued things and values themselves are distributed within a culture. Delving into philosophy, politics, economics, and social history as well as literary texts, Schor traces a shift in the British discourse of mourning in the wake of the French Revolution: What begins as a way to effect a moral consensus in society turns into a means of conceiving and bringing forth history.

Crossing Horizons

World, Self, and Language in Indian and Western Thought
Author: Shlomo Biderman
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231511590
Category: Philosophy
Page: 368
View: 5295
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In this book, Shlomo Biderman examines the views, outlooks, and attitudes of two distinct cultures: the West and classical India. He turns to a rich and varied collection of primary sources: the Rg Veda, the Upanishads, and texts by the Buddhist philosophers Någårjuna and Vasubandhu, among others. In studying the West, Biderman considers the Bible and its commentaries, the writings of such philosophers as Plato, Descartes, Berkeley, Kant, and Derrida, and the literature of Kafka, Melville, and Orwell. Additional sources are Mozart's Don Giovanni and seminal films like Ingmar Bergman's Persona. Biderman uses concrete examples from religion and literature to illustrate the formal aspects of the philosophical problems of transcendence, language, selfhood, and the external world and then demonstrates their plausibility in actual situations. Though his method of analysis is comparative, Biderman does not adopt the disinterested stance of an "ideal" spectator. Rather, Biderman approaches ancient Indian thought and culture from a Western philosophical standpoint to uncover cultural presuppositions that can be difficult to expose from within the culture in question. The result is a fascinating landmark in the study of Indian and Western thought. Through his comparative prism, Biderman explores the most basic ideas underlying human culture, and his investigation not only sheds light on India's philosophical traditions but also facilitates a deeper understanding of our own.

A User's Guide to Franz Rosenzweig's Star of Redemption


Author: Norbert M. Samuelson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317832450
Category: Social Science
Page: 386
View: 7892
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This user-friendly guide will help students of the 'Star' to be able to discuss at a basic level what, at least conceptually, Rosenzweig intended to say and how all that he says is interrelated.

Understanding May Sarton


Author: Mark K. Fulk
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781570034220
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 186
View: 6916
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Fulk provides a comprehensive study - and one that does not assume Sarton's writings to be of interest exclusively or even primarily to female readers. Rather than limiting Sarton's literary accomplishments to the categories of feminist and lesbian writing, as other critics have done, Fulk approaches them in a way that he contends "comes closer to the spirit of Sarton's work as she saw it.""--BOOK JACKET.

A Cultural History of the American Novel, 1890-1940

Henry James to William Faulkner
Author: David Minter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521467490
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 296
View: 2726
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A Cultural History of the American Novel interweaves a wide selection of the novels of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with a series of cultural events ranging from Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show to the "Southern Renaissance" of the 1930s. Minter rereads the novels of the period as works of art that arise from and that remain embedded in culture, arguing conversely that cultural events differ in degree but not in kind from novels. Portrayed as provocative fusions of the real and the imagined, novels and events are made to yield insight into the structures and procedures of American society as well as the structures and procedures of the American imagination, during a critical era of national transformation.

Autobiography and Natural Science in the Age of Romanticism

Rousseau, Goethe, Thoreau
Author: Dr Bernhard Kuhn
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409475328
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 182
View: 6683
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Set against the backdrop of a rapidly fissuring disciplinary landscape where poetry and science are increasingly viewed as irreconcilable and unrelated, Bernhard Kuhn's study uncovers a previously ignored, fundamental connection between autobiography and the natural sciences. Examining the autobiographies and scientific writings of Rousseau, Goethe, and Thoreau as representative of their ages, Kuhn challenges the now entrenched thesis of the "two cultures." Rather, these three writers are exemplary in that their autobiographical and scientific writings may be read not as separate or even antithetical but as mutually constitutive projects that challenge the newly emerging boundaries between scientific and humanistic thought during the Romantic period. Reading each writer's life stories and nature works side by side-as they were written-Kuhn reveals the scientific character of autobiographical writing while demonstrating the autobiographical nature of natural science. He considers all three writers in the context of scientific developments in their own times as well as ours, showing how each one marks a distinctive stage in the growing estrangement of the arts and sciences, from the self-assured epistemic unity of Rousseau's time, to the splintering of disciplines into competing ways of knowing under the pressures of specialization and professionalization during the late Romantic age of Thoreau. His book thus traces an unfolding drama, in which these writers and their contemporaries, each situated in an intellectual landscape more fragmented than the last, seek to keep together what modern culture is determined to break apart.

Outliving the Self

How We Live on in Future Generations
Author: John N. Kotre
Publisher: John Kotre
ISBN: 9780393315233
Category: Adulthood
Page: 282
View: 975
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Using dramatic personal narratives, Kotre expands upon Erik Erikson's concept of generativity. This concept means the variety of ways people find to be fertile in their lives, from the biological task of leaving a genetic legacy, to the emotional work of nurturing and guiding children, to teaching practical skills, transmitting values, and attempting to enrich their culture.

The Cambridge History of American Literature: Volume 6, Prose Writing, 1910-1950


Author: Sacvan Bercovitch,Cyrus R. K. Patell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521497312
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 640
View: 4616
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Discusses the social, cultural, intellectual, and aesthetic aspects of American literature

The Solitary Explorer

Thomas Merton's Transforming Journey
Author: Elena Malits
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1498204643
Category: Religion
Page: 190
View: 5717
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The Solitary Explorer responsibly and critically explores Thomas Merton's lifelong spiritual development as reflected in his religious and secular writings and delineates the meaning of his life and work for contemporary readers. It provides an interpretive chronology of Merton's writings and unravels the intertwining threads of self-realization and widening intellectual interests evidenced in the material he produced between his early autobiography and the controversial work of his later years. Elena Malits shows Merton as writer, as monk, as social critic, as seeker of wisdom in the East, as man of prayer, and as one continually on a journey into the unknown. Merton always held that the quest for God is a continuing one: The Solitary Explorer traces the progress of this quest in Merton's life and literary works to reveal a multifaceted spiritual guide who offers an approach to the divine at once reassuringly traditional and refreshingly contemporary.

The Reveries of the Solitary Walker


Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau,Charles E. Butterworth
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 9780872201620
Category: Philosophy
Page: 266
View: 7314
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First published posthumously in 1782 from an unfinished manuscript, The Reveries of the Solitary Walker continues Rousseau's exploration of the soul in the form of a final meditation on self-understanding and isolation. This accurate and graceful translation by Charles Butterworth--the only English version based on Rousseau's original text--is accompanied by an interpretive essay, extensive notes, and a comprehensive index.

Franz Rosenzweig’s Philosophy of Existence

An Analysis of The Star of Redemption
Author: E.R. Freund
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 940171603X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 189
View: 7556
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The Star of Redemption, * which presents Franz Rosenzweig's system of philosophy, begins with the sentence "from death, (vom Tode) , from the fear of death, originates all cognition of the All" and concludes with the words "into life. " This beginning and this conclusion of the book signify more than the first and last words of philosophical books usually do. Taken together - "from death into life" - they comprise the entire meaning of Rosenzweig's philosophy. The leitmotif of this philosophy is the life and death of the human being and not the I of philosophical idealism, where man ultimately signifies "for ethics" no more than" . . . a point to which it (ethics) relates its problems, as for science also he (man) is only a particular case of its general laws. "l Rosenzweig deals with the individual's actual existence, that which is termi nated by death; he speaks of the individual's hic et nunc, of his actions and decisions in the realm of concrete reality. This philosophy is not an exposition of theoretical principles. It is not concerned with man in general in abstract time, but rather with the individual human being, designated by a proper name, living in his particular time. ** Human existence in its finiteness and temporalness forms the focus in which Rosenzweig's motif can be gathered together.

Refiguring the Map of Sorrow

Nature Writing and Autobiography
Author: Mark Christopher Allister
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813920658
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 199
View: 340
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This study brings together the genres of autobiography and environmental literature. It examines a form of grief narrative in which writers deal with mourning by standing outside the text in writing about the natural world, and inside it in making that exposition part of the grieving process.

The Consultation in Phytotherapy E-Book

The Herbal Practitioner's Approach to the Patient
Author: Peter Conway
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
ISBN: 1455725277
Category: Medical
Page: 424
View: 444
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The Consultation in Phytotherapy considers the means by which the herbal practitioner can seek to appreciate the patient's predicament. Written for both herbal medicine students and practitioners, the book takes a radical approach, challenging readers to reflect on the nature, scope and methods of the consultation in herbal practice. The author asserts that the effective consultation represents a therapeutic act in and of itself, and proposes strategies for maximising and realising this therapeutic potential. The book provides both a complement to, and a critique of, mainstream texts on clinical diagnosis and case management. It contrasts the herbal consultation with that occurring in conventional medicine and offers rationales, arguments and tools aimed at developing an enhanced capacity to achieve profound results in the herbal clinical encounter. About the Author Peter Conway is a practising medical herbalist and has been involved in developing and teaching on several BSc and MSc courses in herbal medicine. He is the President of the College of Practitioners of Phytotherapy and a Director of the European Herbal and Traditional medicine Practitioners Association. Peter helped draft the National Professional Standards for Herbal Medicine and sat on the Department of Health Steering Group on the Statutory Regulation of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine. Key features Provides a context for understanding and appreciating what is meant by "phytotherapy" Explores the notion of the therapeutic relationship in herbal practice and how this can practically be facilitated Considers all aspects pertaining to the aims and structure of the herbal consultation, including history taking, physical examination, investigation, concluding the consultation and providing ongoing care Examines and integrates a broad range of perspectives including those connected with: placebo and the meaning response; complexity and chaos theories; psychoneuroimmunology; evidence- and narrative-based medicine; and phenomenological and traditional medicine approaches.

The Telephone Book

Technology, Schizophrenia, Electric Speech
Author: Avital Ronell
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803289383
Category: Psychology
Page: 465
View: 8425
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The telephone marks the place of an absence. Affiliated with discontinuity, alarm, and silence, it raises fundamental questions about the constitution of self and other, the stability of location, systems of transfer, and the destination of speech. Profoundly changing our concept of long-distance, it is constantly transmitting effects of real and evocative power. To the extent that it always relates us to the absent other, the telephone, and the massive switchboard attending it, plugs into a hermeneutics of mourning. The Telephone Book, itself organized by a "telephonic logic," fields calls from philosophy, history, literature, and psychoanalysis. It installs a switchboard that hooks up diverse types of knowledge while rerouting and jamming the codes of the disciplines in daring ways. Avital Ronell has done nothing less than consider the impact of the telephone on modern thought. Her highly original, multifaceted inquiry into the nature of communication in a technological age will excite everyone who listens in. The book begins by calling close attention to the importance of the telephone in Nazi organization and propaganda, with special regard to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. In the Third Reich the telephone became a weapon, a means of state surveillance, "an open accomplice to lies." Heidegger, in Being and Time and elsewhere, elaborates on the significance of "the call." In a tour de force response, Ronell mobilizes the history and terminology of the telephone to explicate his difficult philosophy. Ronell also speaks of the appearance of the telephone in the literary works of Duras, Joyce, Kafka, Rilke, and Strindberg. She examines its role in psychoanalysis—Freud said that the unconscious is structured like a telephone, and Jung and R. D. Laing saw it as a powerful new body part. She traces its historical development from Bell's famous first call: "Watson, come here!" Thomas A. Watson, his assistant, who used to communicate with spirits, was eager to get the telephone to talk, and thus to link technology with phantoms and phantasms. In many ways a meditation on the technologically constituted state, The Telephone Book opens a new field, becoming the first political deconstruction of technology, state terrorism, and schizophrenia. And it offers a fresh reading of the American and European addiction to technology in which the telephone emerges as the crucial figure of this age.

Eschatology, Liturgy and Christology

Toward Recovering an Eschatological Imagination
Author: Thomas Rausch
Publisher: Liturgical Press
ISBN: 0814680518
Category: Religion
Page: 184
View: 3904
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"If Christian hope is reduced to the salvation of the soul in a heaven beyond death," wrote Jürgen Moltmann, "it loses its power to renew life and change the world, and its flame is quenched." Thomas Rausch, SJ, agrees, arguing that too often the hoped-for eschaton has been replaced by an almost exclusive emphasis on the "four last things"-death and judgment, heaven and hell. But eschatology cannot be reduced to the individual salvation. In his new book, Rausch explores eschatology's intersections with Christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, and, perhaps most intriguingly, liturgy. With the early Christians, he sees God's future as a radically social reality, already present initially in Christian worship, especially in the celebration of the Eucharist. This fresh and insightful work of theology engages voices both ancient and contemporary.