The Spanish Conquest of New Mexico

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: W. W. H. Davis

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1330216407

Category: History

Page: 442

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Excerpt from The Spanish Conquest of New Mexico The conquest of that portion of tho North American continent lately the province, now the territory, of New Mexico, and which the United States acquired from Mexico under the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, is an unpublished page in Spanish-American history. The historian has overlooked this field of early adventure and given his attention to what seemed a more inviting banquet, thus depriving the world of one of the most interesting relations of incidents to be met with in the record of early explorations in the New World. The earliest mention of Spaniards penetrating into New Mexico is found in the journal of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca written in the first half of the sixteenth century. He wad an officer of the unfortunate expedition of Narvaez, and with three companions was wandering nearly ten years across the continent, at the end of which time he reached the Spanish settlements on the gulf of California. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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Mexico and the Spanish Conquest

In this second edition of his classic work, Hassig incorporates new research in the same concise manner that made the original edition so popular and provides further explanations of the actions and motivations of Cortés, Moteuczoma, and ...

Author: Ross Hassig

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806148199

Category: History

Page: 288

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What role did indigenous peoples play in the Spanish conquest of Mexico? Ross Hassig explores this question in Mexico and the Spanish Conquest by incorporating primary accounts from the Indians of Mexico and revisiting the events of the conquest against the backdrop of the Aztec empire, the culture and politics of Mesoamerica, and the military dynamics of both sides. He analyzes the weapons, tactics, and strategies employed by both the Indians and the Spaniards, and concludes that the conquest was less a Spanish victory than it was a victory of Indians over other Indians, which the Spaniards were able to exploit to their own advantage. In this second edition of his classic work, Hassig incorporates new research in the same concise manner that made the original edition so popular and provides further explanations of the actions and motivations of Cortés, Moteuczoma, and other key figures. He also explores their impact on larger events and examines in greater detail Spanish military tactics and strategies.
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The Conquest of New Spain

Late in life, when Díaz del Castillo was eighty-four years old, and residing in his encomienda estates in Guatemala, he wrote The True History of the Conquest of New Spain to defend the story of the common-soldier conquistador within the ...

Author: Bernal Diaz Del Castillo

Publisher:

ISBN: 1499546300

Category: History

Page: 356

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The Conquest of New Spain is the first-person narrative of Bernal D�az del Castillo (1492-1581), the 16th-century military adventurer, conquistador, and colonist settler, who served in three Mexican expeditions; those of Francisco Hern�ndez de C�rdoba (1517) to the Yucat�n peninsula; the expedition of Juan de Grijalva (1518), and the expedition of Hern�n Cort�s (1517) in the Valley of Mexico; the history relates his participation in the fall of Emperor Moctezuma II, and the subsequent defeat of the Aztec empire. In the colonial history of Latin America, The Conquest of New Spain is a vivid, military account that establishes Bernal D�az del Castillo "among chroniclers what Daniel Defoe is among novelists". Late in life, when D�az del Castillo was eighty-four years old, and residing in his encomienda estates in Guatemala, he wrote The True History of the Conquest of New Spain to defend the story of the common-soldier conquistador within the histories about the Spanish conquest of Mexico. He presents his narrative as an alternative to the critical writings of Fr. Bartolom� de Las Casas, whose Indian-native histories emphasized the cruelty of the conquest; and the histories of the hagiographic biographers of Hern�n Cort�s - specifically that of Francisco L�pez de G�mara, whom he believed minimized the role of the 700 enlisted soldiers who were instrumental to conquering the Aztec empire. That said historians and hagiographers speak the truth "neither in the beginning, nor the middle, nor the end", is why D�az del Castillo strongly defended the actions of the conquistadors, whilst emphasising their humanity and honesty in his eyewitness narrative, which he summarised as: "We went there to serve God, and also to get rich". The history is occasionally uncharitable about Captain Cort�s, because, like other professional soldiers who participated in the Conquest of New Spain, D�az del Castillo found himself among the ruins of Tenochtitl�n only slightly wealthier than when he arrived to Mexico; a financial state common to many soldiers, who accused Cort�s of taking more loot than his agreed fifth of the Aztec treasury. Certainly, the land and gold compensation paid to many of the conquistadores proved a poor return for their investment of months of soldiering and fighting across Mexico and the Anahuac Valley. Another interpretation of The Conquest of New Spain proposes that the author was one of several family relatives of Diego Vel�zquez de Cu�llar, the governor of Cuba, and mortal enemy of Cort�s; many of whom later plotted against the conquistador Captain. Although the narrative thrust diminishes the Cort�s-D�az del Castillo relationship, contrary to the factual record, his complex relationship with Cort�s, and the sub-ordinate captains, suggests that, although he represented the faction of Governor Vel�zquez de Cu�llar in the expedition, Bernal D�az del Castillo fully honoured his personal and military loyalty to Hern�n Cort�s.
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The Spanish Colonial Settlement Landscapes of New Mexico 1598 1680

Presented for the first time is a detailed picture of the Spanish settlement landscape of New Mexico during the period from the beginning of colonization in 1598 up to 1680.

Author: Elinore M. Barrett

Publisher:

ISBN: 0826350844

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 540

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Presented for the first time is a detailed picture of the Spanish settlement landscape of New Mexico during the period from the beginning of colonization in 1598 up to 1680.
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History of New Mexico

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Author: Helen Haines

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN: 034428039X

Category:

Page: 658

View: 193

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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History of New Mexico

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Helen Haines

Publisher: Arkose Press

ISBN: 1345013752

Category:

Page: 662

View: 950

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Spanish Conquest of Mexico Revised Edition

Can the conquest of one city change the world?

Author: Sylvia A. Johnson

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 9781467703826

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 154

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Can the conquest of one city change the world? In 1519, two powerful empires - Spain and Mexica (Aztec) - were hungry for expansion in central Mexico. Led by emperor Motecuzoma II, the Mexica people had subdued their native enemies and now controlled a sprawling territory with the great city of Tenochtitlán at the center. Then the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés led an attack on the Mexica empire. Although the Spaniards had horses and guns, both unknown in the Americas, the Mexica outnumbered them five hundred to one. The Spaniards had no chance of success without the help of native allies unhappy with Mexica rule. What followed was a desperate war that lasted two years, cost thousands of lives, and left Tenochtitlán in ruins. In 1521 Cortés declared Mexico a colony of New Spain. In so doing, he laid the groundwork for the expansion of European power throughout the Americas and changed the world forever. The Spanish conquest of Mexico is one of world history's pivotal moments.
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Pueblos Spaniards and the Kingdom of New Mexico

Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexico is the definitive account of a volatile era.

Author: John L. Kessell

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015079202548

Category: History

Page: 225

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For more than four hundred years in New Mexico, Pueblo Indians and Spaniards have lived “together yet apart.” Now the preeminent historian of that region's colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship. Brimming with new insights embedded in an engaging narrative, Kessell's work presents a clearer picture than ever before of events leading to the Pueblo Revolt. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexico is the definitive account of a volatile era.
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The Conquest of Mexico

The Conquest of Mexico is a brilliant account of the Spanish conquest of Mexico, written from a new and unfamiliar angle.

Author: Serge Gruzinski

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780745683560

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 193

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The Conquest of Mexico is a brilliant account of the Spanish conquest of Mexico, written from a new and unfamiliar angle. Gruzinski analyses the process of colonization that took place in native Indian societies over three centuries, focusing on disruptions to the Indian's memory, changes in their perception of reality, the spread of the European idea of the supernatural and the Spanish colonists' introduction of alphabetical script which the Indians had to combine with their own traditional - oral and pictorial - forms of communication. Gruzinski discusses the Indians' often awkward initiation into writing, their assimilation of Spanish culture, and their subsequent reinterpretation of their own past and recovers the changing Indian perceptions of the sacred and their 'absorption' of elements from the Christian tradition. The Conquest of Mexico is a major work of cultural history which reconstructs a crucial episode in the European colonization of the New World. It is also an important contribution to the study of the relationship between memory, orality, images and writing in history.
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