Journal

From 1837 to 1861, Thoreau kept a Journal that began as a conventional record of ideas, grew into a writer's notebook, and eventually became the principal imaginative work of his career.

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691065411

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

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From 1837 to 1861, Thoreau kept a Journal that began as a conventional record of ideas, grew into a writer's notebook, and eventually became the principal imaginative work of his career. The source of much of his published writing, the Journal is also a record of his interior life and of his monumental studies of the natural history of his native Concord, Massachusetts. Unlike earlier editions, the Princeton edition reproduces the Journal in its original and complete form, in a reading text free of editorial interpolations but keyed to a comprehensive scholarly apparatus. Journal 8: 1854 is edited from the 467-page notebook that Thoreau kept February 13-September 3, 1854. It reveals him as an increasingly confident taxonomist creating lists that distill his observations about plant leafing and seasonal birds. Two particularly significant public events took place in his life in the summer of 1854. On July 4, at an antislavery rally at Framingham, Massachusetts, Thoreau appeared for the first time in the company of prominent abolitionists, delivering as heated a statement against slavery as he had yet made. And on August 9, Ticknor and Fields published Walden, the book Thoreau had been working on since 1846. In Journal 8 Thoreau indicates that these public accomplishments, though satisfying, took a toll on his creative life and did not fully compensate him for the hours spent away from the woods.
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The Writings of Henry David Thoreau Volume 3

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 1357319800

Category:

Page: 458

View: 854

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Writings of Henry David Thoreau Volume 3

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition.

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com

ISBN: 1230096337

Category:

Page: 96

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...go myself; me wants to get some moose;" and kept on scraping the skin. His brother had been into the woods with my relative only a year or two before, and the Indian now inquired what the latter had done to him, that he did not come back, for he had not seen nor heard from him since. At length we got round to the more interesting topic again. The ferryman had told us that all the best Indians were gone except Polis, who was one of the aristocracy. He to be sure would be the best man we could have, but if he went at all would want a great price; so we did not expect to get him. Polis asked at first two dollars a day, but agreed to go for a dollar and a half, and fifty cents a week for his canoe. He would come to Bangor with his canoe by the seven o'clock train that evening, --we might depend on him. We thought ourselves lucky to secure the services of this man, who was known'to be particularly steady and trustworthy. I spent the afternoon with my companion, who had remained in Bangor, in preparing for our expedition, purchasing provisions, hard-bread, pork, cofiee, sugar, etc., and some india-rubber clothing. We had at first thought of exploring the St. John from its source to its mouth, or else to go up the Penobscot by its East Branch to the lakes of the St. John, and return by way of Chesuncook and Moosehead. We had finally inclined to the last route, only reversing the order of it, going by way of Moosehead, and returning by the Penobscot, otherwise it would have been all the way upstream and taken twice as long. At evening the Indian arrived in the cars, and I led the way while he followed me three quarters of a mile to my friend's house, with the canoe on his head. I did not know the exact route myself, but steered...
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The Writings of Henry David Thoreau

This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended.

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher:

ISBN: 0461545411

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 943

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This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended. Since the original versions are generally quite old, there may occasionally be certain imperfections within these reproductions. We're happy to make these classics available again for future generations to enjoy!
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WRITINGS OF HENRY DAVID THOREA

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Henry David 1817-1862 Thoreau

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 1373985070

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 482

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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Simplify Simplify

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 98, Houghton Mifflin (1906). See also BOOKS Some hard and dry book in a dead language, which you have found it impossible to read at ...

Author: Kevin Van Anglen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231103893

Category: Reference

Page: 224

View: 557

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Sampling from Walden, "Civil Disobedience," The Maine Woods, and Henry David Thoreau's abolitionist and nature writings, letters, and other texts, Kevin P. Van Anglen distills the intellectual's immense, creative, clever, and surprisingly progressive thought into 750 quotations, offering a concise and straightforward introduction to his profound philosophy. Addressing subjects ranging from English literature, the act of reading, and the art of love to independence, ecology, and democratic government, Thoreau was a true original writing at a time of burgeoning American exceptionalism, and his incomparable insight continues to thrill readers from all generations and backgrounds.
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The Journal of Henry David Thoreau

This third volume of the Journal covers September 1851 to April 1852. During the eight months depicted here, Thoreau added to his observations about nature, specifically the play of light during sunsets and moonlit nights.

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Coyote Canyon Press

ISBN: 0989008037

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 508

View: 839

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When Henry David Thoreau died in 1862 he left behind a journal of over two million words, more than what most major writers produce in a lifetime. Begun in 1837 at the suggestion of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thoreau's Journal comprises fourteen volumes and, of all his writings, comes closest to the man himself. His journal was his life work, the near-daily record of his thoughts and observations. This third volume of the Journal covers September 1851 to April 1852. During the eight months depicted here, Thoreau added to his observations about nature, specifically the play of light during sunsets and moonlit nights. In the interest of science, he conducted studies of bees and wasps, lichens, and floodwater. About his personal life, he mulls over the nature of his friendship with the Emersons and his love of local farmers. He describes his long walks with his friend Ellery Channing. He also details how he helped a fugitive slave on his way to freedom in Canada. The volume also includes Thoreau's efforts to give aid to the Irish Catholic immigrants of Concord.
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Thoreau s Nature

Early Essays : The Writings of Henry David Thoreau : Early Essays and Miscellanies , ed . ... Volume 3 : 1848-1851 , ed . ... Volume 4 : 1851-1852 , ed . Leonard N. Neufeldt and Nancy Craig Simmons , 1992 . 1 Why Thoreau ...

Author: Jane Bennett

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0742521419

Category: Political Science

Page: 141

View: 172

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Thoreau's Nature: Ethics, Politics, and the Wild explores how Thoreau crafted a life open to 'the Wild, ' a term that marks the startling element of foreignness in every object of experience, however familiar. Thoreau's encounters with nature, Bennett argues, allowed him to resist his all-too-human tendency toward intellectual laziness, social conformity, and political complacency. Bennett pursues this theme by constructing a series of dialogues between Thoreau and our contemporaries: Foucault on identity and power, Haraway on the nature/culture of division, Hollywood celebrities on the Walden Woods Project, the National Endowment for the Humanities on politics and art, and Kafka on the question of political idealism. The pertinence to the late 20th century of Thoreau's pursuit of independent judgment, ecological foresight, and moral nobility becomes apparent through these engagements
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Lost Creeks

Thoreau, Henry D. Journal. Vol. 14: August 1, 1860–Nov. 3, 1861. Bradford Torrey, ed. Walden ed. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, and Company, 1906. Vol. 20 of The Writings ofHenry David Thoreau. 20 vols. 1906. [Autograph: Alex Posey.] ...

Author: Alexander Lawrence Posey

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803224711

Category: Social Science

Page: 187

View: 114

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Lost Creeks collects for the first time all the journals and shorter autobiographical works of noted Muscogee (Creek) writer, humorist, and political activist Alexander Posey (1873 1908). In his brief but productive life Posey became an influential political spokesperson, man of letters, and advocate for better conditions in Indian Territory. Posey s journals reveal much about his turbulent but noteworthy political career, his personal aspirations and challenges, and the creative process behind not only his poetry and short stories but also his famed Fus Fixico letters. Drawing on extensive archival research, Matthew Wynn Sivils produces a carefully annotated edition of the journals and also provides abundant contextual information. This volume enriches and personalizes the legacy of this remarkable Native writer and provides new insight into the beginnings of twentieth-century Native intellectual, political, and literary movements and traditions.
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Nineteenth Century Prose

Nora Crook Anglia Polytechnic , Cambridge , England The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau : Journal , Volume 3 : 1848–1865 , ed . Robert Sattelmeyer , Mark R. Patterson , and William Rossi ( Princeton UP , 1990 ) , 620 pp . , $ 39.50 cloth ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OSU:32435054940770

Category: English literature

Page:

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Henry James Complete Stories Vol 3 1884 1891 LOA 107

James Madison , Writings ( 1999 ) 110. Dashiell Hammett , Complete Novels ( 1999 ) III . Henry James ... American Poetry : The Twentieth Century , Vol . 1 ( 2000 ) 116. ... Henry David Thoreau , Collected Essays and Poems ( 2001 ) 125.

Author: Henry James

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 1883011647

Category: Fiction

Page: 896

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Sometimes overshadowed by his work as a novelist, Henry James’s short fiction is an astonishing achievement, a triumph of inventiveness and restless curiosity. This Library of America volume (the third of five volumes devoted to his short fiction) includes among its seventeen stories some of James’s greatest masterpieces. “The Aspern Papers” is a stunning novella about emotional ruthlessness in the service of literary scholarship. “The Pupil” is a densely suggestive account of the moral perplexities underlying the relationship between an impoverished tutor and a young invalid. “The Lesson of the Master” is an intricate study of ambition, disappointment, and the demands of a life devoted to art. “Brooksmith” is a moving portrait of a house servant and “Sir Edmund Orme” is an enthralling ghost story. In “The Liar,” a painter attempts to force a former love to admit that her present husband is a pathological liar; in “The Patagonia,” a young man cavalierly flirts with a young woman en route to her wedding in England, with disastrous consequences. More than half the stories within this volume are available in no other edition. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
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The Fate of Transcendentalism

The Writings of Henry David Thoreau: Journal, Volume 1: 1837–1844. Edited by Eliza‐beth Witherelletal. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1981. ———. The Writings of Henry David Thoreau: Journal, Volume 3: 1848–1851.

Author: Bruce A. Ronda

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820351254

Category: Philosophy

Page: 260

View: 551

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The Fate of Transcendentalism examines the mid-nineteenth-century flowering of American transcendentalism and shows the movement’s influence on several subsequent writers, thinkers, and artists who have drawn inspiration and energy from the creative outpouring it produced. In this wide-ranging study, Bruce A. Ronda offers an account of the movement as an early example of the secular turn in American culture and brings to bear insights from philosopher Charles Taylor and others who have studied the broad cultural phenomenon of secularization. Ronda’s account turns on the interplay and tension between two strands in the transcendentalist movement. Many of the social experiments associated with transcendentalism, such as the Brook Farm and Fruitlands reform communities, Temple School, and the West Street Bookshop, as well as the transcendentalists’ contributions to abolition and women’s rights, spring from a commitment to human flourishing without reference to a larger religious worldview. Other aspects of the movement, particularly Henry Thoreau’s late nature writing and the rich tradition it has inspired, seek to minimize the difference between the material and the ideal, the human and the not-human. The Fate of Transcendentalism allows readers to engage with this fascinating dialogue between transcendentalist thinkers who believe that the ultimate end of human life is the fulfillment of human possibility and others who challenge human-centeredness in favor a relocation of humanity in a vital cosmos. Ronda traces the persistence of transcendentalism in the work of several representative twentieth- and twenty-first-century figures, including Charles Ives, Joseph Cornell, Truman Nelson, Annie Dillard, and Mary Oliver, and shows how this dialogue continues to inform important imaginative work to this date.
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Silencing the Sounded Self

Christopher Shultis, “Saying Nothing: John Cage and Henry David Thoreau's Aesthetics of Co-Existence,” in Tijdschrift voor Muziektheorie, vol. 3, no. 3 (November 1998), pp. 169–177; Shultis, “Beide(s): John Cage und Henry David Thoreaus ...

Author: Christopher Shultis

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781611685084

Category: Music

Page: 210

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Christopher Shultis observes an intriguing contrast between John Cage's affinity for Thoreau and fellow composer Charles Ives' connection with Emerson. Although both Thoreau and Emerson have been called transcendentalists, they held different views about the relationship between nature and humanity and the artistÍs role in creativity. Shultis explores the artist's "sounded" or "silenced" selves-the self that takes control of the creative experience versus the one that seeks to coexist with it-and shows how understanding this distinction allows a better understanding of Cage. Having placed Cage in this experimental tradition of music, poetry, and literature, Shultis offers provocative interpretations of Cage's aesthetic views, especially as they concern the issue of non-intention, and addresses some of his most path-breaking music as well as several experimentally innovative written works.
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Xenocitizens

Thoreau, Journal, vol. 3, 96. 28. 1 Samuel 7:12 (King James Version). 29. Henry David Thoreau, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, ed. Carl F. Hovde et al., The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau (Princeton: Princeton University Press ...

Author: Jason Berger

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 9780823287765

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

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In Xenocitizens, Jason Berger returns to the antebellum United States in order to challenge a scholarly tradition based on liberal–humanist perspectives. Through the concept of the xenocitizen, a synthesis of the terms “xeno,” which connotes alien or stranger, and “citizen,” which signals a naturalized subject of a state, Berger uncovers realities and possibilities that have been foreclosed by dominant paradigms. Innovatively re-orienting our thinking about traditional nineteenth-century figures such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau as well as formative writers such as William Wells Brown, Martin R. Delany, Margaret Fuller, and Harriet Beecher Stowe, Xenocitizens glimpses how antebellum thinkers formulated, in response to varying forms of oppression and crisis, startlingly unique ontological and social models as well as unfamiliar ways to exist and to leverage change. In doing so, Berger offers us a different nineteenth century—pushing our imaginative and critical thinking toward new terrain.
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Reading Reality

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1987. Thoreau, Henry David. Walden. The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau. Edited by J. Lyndon Shanley. ... The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau: Journal Volume 3: 1848–1851. Edited by Robert Sattelmeyer ...

Author: E. Thomas Finan

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813945613

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

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In the early 1800s, American critics warned about the danger of literature as a distraction from reality. Later critical accounts held that American literature during the antebellum period was idealistic and that literature grew more realistic after the horrors of the Civil War. By focusing on three leading American authors—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson—Reading Reality challenges that analysis. Thomas Finan reveals how antebellum authors used words such as "real" and "reality" as key terms for literary discourse and claimed that the "real" was, in fact, central to their literary enterprise. He argues that for many Americans in the early nineteenth century, the "real" was often not synonymous with the physical world. It could refer to the spiritual, the sincere, or the individual’s experience. He further explains how this awareness revises our understanding of the literary and conceptual strategies of American writers. By unpacking antebellum senses of the "real," Finan casts new light on the formal traits of the period’s literature, the pressures of the literary marketplace in nineteenth-century America, and the surprising possibilities of literary reading.
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Emerson s Metaphysics

Journal, Volume 3: 1848–1851. Ed. Robert Sattelmeyer, Mark R. Patterson, and William Rossi. The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau. Ed. Walter Harding, et al. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991. ——. Walden. Ed. J. Lyndon Shanley.

Author: Joseph Urbas

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498524513

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

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This book gives the first complete, fully historicized account of Emerson's metaphysics of cause and effect and its foundational position in his philosophy as a whole. Joseph Urbas proposes an intellectual biography of Emerson the metaphysician but also the life-story of a concept synonymous, in the Transcendentalist period, with life itself—the story of the principle at the origin of all being and change.
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Arcadian America

Thoreau, journal entries for July or August, 1850, in The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau: Journal: Volume 3, 1848–1851, ed. Robert Sattelmeyer, Mark R. Patterson, and William Rossi (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990), ...

Author: Aaron Sachs

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300189056

Category: Architecture

Page: 480

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Perhaps America's best environmental idea was not the national park but the garden cemetery, a use of space that quickly gained popularity in the mid-nineteenth century. Such spaces of repose brought key elements of the countryside into rapidly expanding cities, making nature accessible to all and serving to remind visitors of the natural cycles of life. In this unique interdisciplinary blend of historical narrative, cultural criticism, and poignant memoir, Aaron Sachs argues that American cemeteries embody a forgotten landscape tradition that has much to teach us in our current moment of environmental crisis. Until the trauma of the Civil War, many Americans sought to shape society into what they thought of as an Arcadia--not an Eden where fruit simply fell off the tree, but a public garden that depended on an ethic of communal care, and whose sense of beauty and repose related directly to an acknowledgement of mortality and limitation. Sachs explores the notion of Arcadia in the works of nineteenth-century nature writers, novelists, painters, horticulturists, landscape architects, and city planners, and holds up for comparison the twenty-first century's--and his own--tendency toward denial of both death and environmental limits. His far-reaching insights suggest new possibilities for the environmental movement today and new ways of understanding American history.
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