Theatre Symposium Vol 21

Ritual, Religion, and Theatre Edward Bert Wallace. A PUBLICATION OF THE SOUTHEASTERN THEATRE CONFERENCE Ritual, Religion, and Theatre Volume 21 Published by ...

Author: Edward Bert Wallace

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370084

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 144

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Volume 21 of Theatre Symposium presents essays that explore the intricate and vital relationships between theatre, religion, and ritual. Whether or not theatre arose from ritual and/or religion, from prehistory to the present there have been clear and vital connections among the three. Ritual, Religion, and Theatre, volume 21 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium, presents a series of essays that explore the intricate and vital relationships that exist, historically and today, between these various modes of expression and performance. The essays in this volume discuss the stage presence of the spiritual meme; ritual performance and spirituality in The Living Theatre; theatricality, themes, and theology in James Weldon Johnson’s God’s Trombones; Jordan Harrison’s Act a Lady and the ritual of queerness; Gerpla and national identity in Iceland; confession in Hamlet and Measure for Measure; Christian liturgical drama; Muslim theatre and performance; cave rituals and the Brain’s Theatre; and other, more general issues. Edited by E. Bert Wallace, this latest publication by the largest regional theatre organization in the United States collects the most current scholarship on theatre history and theory. CONTRIBUTORS Cohen Ambrose / David Callaghan / Gregory S. Carr Matt DiCintio / William Doan / Tom F. Driver / Steve Earnest Jennifer Flaherty / Charles A. Gillespie / Thomas L. King Justin Kosec / Mark Pizzato / Kate Stratton
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Theatre Symposium Vol 17

... “Story of Missing Colony Told in National Setting on North Carolina Coast,” Baltimore Sun, July 21, 1937, clipping in Federal Theatre Scrapbook, vol.

Author: Jay Malarcher

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817355555

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 136

View: 344

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Outdoor drama takes many forms: ancient Greek theatre, open-air performances of Shakespeare at summer festivals, and re-enactments of landmark historical events. The essays gathered in "Outdoor Performance," Volume 17 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium, address outdoor theatre's many manifestations, including the historical and non-traditional. Among other subjects, these essays explore the rise of "airdomes" as performance spaces in the American Midwest in the first half of the 20th century; the civic-religious pageants staged by certain Mormon congregations; Wheels-A-Rolling, and other railroad themed pageants; first-hand accounts of the innovative Hunter Hills theatre program in Tennessee; the role of traditional outdoor historical drama, particularly the long-running performances of Paul Green's The Lost Colony; and the rise of the part dance, part sport, part performance phenomenon "parkour"-- the improvised traversal of obstacles found in both urban and rural landscapes.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 27

Theatre and Embodiment Sarah McCarroll ... Michael Gazzaniga, The Mind's Past (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), 21. 3.

Author: Sarah McCarroll

Publisher: Theatre Symposium

ISBN: 9780817370145

Category: Art

Page: 128

View: 357

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A substantive exploration of bodies and embodiment in theatre Theatre is inescapably about bodies. By definition, theatre requires the live bodies of performers in the same space and at the same time as the live bodies of an audience. And, yet, it's hard to talk about bodies. We talk about characters; we talk about actors; we talk about costume and movement. But we often approach these as identities or processes layered onto bodies, rather than as inescapably entwined with them. Bodies on the theatrical stage hold the power of transformation. Theatre practitioners, scholars, and educators must think about what bodies go where onstage and what stories which bodies to tell. The essays in Theatre Symposium, Volume 27 explore a broad range of issues related to embodiment. The volume begins with Rhonda Blair's keynote essay, in which she provides an overview of the current cognitive science underpinning our understanding of what it means to be "embodied" and to talk about "embodiment." She also provides a set of goals and cautions for theatre artists engaging with the available science on embodiment, while issuing a call for the absolute necessity for that engagement, given the primacy of the body to the theatrical act. The following three essays provide examinations of historical bodies in performance. Timothy Pyles works to shift the common textual focus of Racinian scholarship to a more embodied understanding through his examination of the performances of the young female students of the Saint-Cyr academy in two of Racine's Biblical plays. Shifting forward in time by three centuries, Travis Stern's exploration of the auratic celebrity of baseball player Mike Kelly uncovers the ways in which bodies may retain the ghosts of their former selves long after physical ability and wealth are gone. Laurence D. Smith's investigation of actress Manda Björling's performances in Miss Julie provides a model for how cognitive science, in this case theories of cognitive blending, can be integrated with archival theatrical research and scholarship. From scholarship grounded in analysis of historical bodies and embodiment, the volume shifts to pedagogical concerns. Kaja Amado Dunn's essay on the ways in which careless selection of working texts can inflict embodied harm on students of color issues an imperative call for careful and intentional classroom practice in theatre training programs. Cohen Ambrose's theorization of pedagogical cognitive ecologies, in which subjects usually taught disparately (acting, theatre history, costume design, for example) could be approached collaboratively and through embodiment, speaks to ways in which this call might be answered. Tessa Carr's essay on "The Integration of Tuskegee High School" brings together ideas of historical bodies and embodiment in the academic theatrical context through an examination of the process of creating a documentary theatre production. The final piece in the volume, Bridget Sundin's exchange with the ghost of Marlene Dietrich, is an imaginative exploration of how it is possible to open the archive, to create new spaces for performance scholarship, via an interaction with the body.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 22

Charles Isherwood, “21st Century Grover's Corners, with the Audience as Neighbors,” New York Times, February 26, 2009, http://theater.nytimes.com ...

Author: Jane Barnette

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370091

Category: Drama

Page: 137

View: 699

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The eleven original essays in Volume 22 of Theatre Symposium examine facets of the historical and current business of theatre.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 28

Theatre and Citizenship Andrew Gibb ... 21. Lisa Brooks, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, ...

Author: Andrew Gibb

Publisher: Theatre Symposium

ISBN: 9780817370152

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 136

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Theatre Symposium Vol 19

Robert Edmond Jones, “The Future Decorative Art of the Theatre,” in Scene ... 21. Ibid. 22. “Macbeth in the Void,” Nation 112 (March 2, 1921): 350. 23.

Author: J K Curry

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370060

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 152

View: 181

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Normal0falsefalsefalseMicrosoftInternetExplorer4Despite a shared history and many common present practices, the relationship between theatre and film often remains uncertain. Does a close study of film enrich an understanding of drama on the stage? What ongoing connections do theatre and film maintain, and what elements do they borrow from each other? Does the relative popularity and accessibility of film lead to an increased scholarly defensiveness about qualities exclusive to theatrical performances? Do theatre and film demand two different kinds of attention from spectators, or do audiences tend to experience both in the same ways? The essays in “Theatre Symposium: Volume 19” present this dynamic coexistence of theatre and film, and examine the nature of their mutual influence on each other. Bruce McConachie, in his contribution to the collection, “Theatre and Film in Evolutionary Perspective,” argues that the cognitive functions used to interpret either media arise from the same evolutionary foundation, and that therefore the viewing experiences of theatre and film are closely linked to each other. In “Robert Edmond Jones: Theatre and Motion Pictures, Bridging Reality and Dreams,” Anthony Hostetter and Elisabeth Hostetter consider Jones’ influential vision of a “theater of the future,” in which traditional stage performances incorporate mediated video material into stage productions. Becky Becker’s “Nollywood: Film and Home Video, of the Death of Nigerian Theatre,” by focusing on the current conversation in Nigeria, discusses the anxiety generated by a film and video industry burgeoning into and displacing theatre culture These and the six other essays in “Theatre Symposium: Volume 19” shed light on the current state of affairs—the collaborations and the tensions—between two distinctly individual yet inextricably related artistic media.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 18

Aleks Sierz, In-Yer-Face Theatre: British Drama Today (London: Faber and Faber, 2001), 5. 16. ... 21. Kate Bassett, review of Phaedra's Love, by Sarah Kane, ...

Author: J K Curry

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370053

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 151

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Stage properties are an often-ignored aspect of theatrical productions, in part because their usage is meant to be seamlessly integrated into the performance instead of a focal point for the audience. The contributors illuminate many aspects of this largely ignored yet crucial part of the theatre.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 20

20. Jean E. Howard, Theater of a City: The Places of London Comedy, 1598– 1642 (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007), 215. 21. Ibid., 3.

Author: Edward Bert Wallace

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370077

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 125

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The audience is an integral part of performance and is in fact what separates a rehearsal from a performance. The relationship, however, between performers and the audience has evolved over time, which is one of the subjects addressed, along with the changing disposition of the audience itself and a number of other topics, in Gods and Groundlings, volume 20 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium. The essays in this volume discuss spectatorship in historical context, the role of the audience in the digital age, the early modern English transvestite theatre, Annie Oakley and the disruption of Victorian audiences, and historical attempts to create ideal audiences. Edited by E. Bert Wallace, this latest publication from the largest regional theatre organization in the United States collects the most current scholarship on theatre history and theory. Contributors To Volume 20 Susan Bennett / Jane Barnette / Becky Becker / Lisa Bernd / Evan Bridenstine / Michael Jaros / Robert I. Lublin / Paulette Marty
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Theatre Symposium Vol 25

21. McNeal's use of a kimono, a traditional Japanese garment, in the creation of a decidedly Chinese character illustrates the slippage and conflation often ...

Author: Becky K. Becker

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370121

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 112

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Addresses the ways that theatre both shapes cross-cultural dialogue and is itself, in turn, shaped by those forces. Globalization may strike many as a phenomenon of our own historical moment, but it is truly as old as civilization: we need only look to the ancient Silk Road linking the Far East to the Mediterranean in order to find some of the earliest recorded impacts of people and goods crossing borders. Yet, in the current cultural moment, tensions are high due to increased migration, economic unpredictability, complicated acts of local and global terror, and heightened political divisions all over the world. Thus globalization seems new and a threat to our ways of life, to our nations, and to our cultures. In what ways have theatre practitioners, educators, and scholars worked to support cross-cultural dialogue historically? And in what ways might theatre embrace the complexities and contradictions inherent in any meaningful exchange? The essays in Theatre Symposium, Volume 25 reflect on these questions. Featured in Theatre Symposium, Volume 25“Theatre as Cultural Exchange: Stages and Studios of Learning” by Anita Gonzalez“Certain Kinds of Dances Used among Them: An Initial Inquiry into Colonial Spanish Encounters with the Areytos of the Taíno in Puerto Rico” by E. Bert Wallace“Gertrude Hoffmann’s Lawful Piracy: ‘A Vision of Salome’ and the Russian Season as Transatlantic Production Impersonations” by Sunny Stalter-Pace“Greasing the Global: Princess Lotus Blossom and the Fabrication of the ‘Orient’ to Pitch Products in the American Medicine Show” by Chase Bringardner“Dismembering Tennessee Williams: The Global Context of Lee Breuer’s A Streetcar Named Desire” by Daniel Ciba“Transformative Cross-Cultural Dialogue in Prague: Americans Creating Czech History Plays” by Karen Berman“Finding Common Ground: Lessac Training across Cultures” by Erica Tobolski and Deborah A. Kinghorn
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Theatre Symposium Vol 24

9 Marvin Carlson The Odeon of Pericles: A Tale of the First Athenian 21 Music Hall, the Second Persian Invasion of Greece, Theatre Space in Fifth Century ...

Author: Becky K. Becker

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370114

Category: Drama

Page: 144

View: 367

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Theatre Symposium, Volume 24 addresses theatre and space as a wide-ranging topic in theatre history, examining the myriad spatial arrangements, architectural styles, and historical contexts that inform theatrical productions, and the relationships of audiences to those spaces."
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Theatre Symposium Vol 9

Theatre and Politics in the Twentieth Century John Countryman, Noreen Barnes-McLain. ticular theatre comes to an end because it is no longer useful to its ...

Author:

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817311117

Category: Music

Page: 130

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Political commentary is possible through variety theatre, this volume contends. Compiled from the April 2000 Theatre Symposium held on the campus of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, this collection of essays presents a mix of theoretical and practical point from various scholars around the country. What remains to be learned about the political objectives of Brecht's Lehrstriuke? What can we learn from Mordecai Gorelik's political/artistic philosophy that might inform contemporary practice? Is Thornton Wilder's Our Town the play we've always imagined it to be, or does it challenge the politics of its time? These are only some of the questions addressed by this informative discussion.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 15

Theatre and Moral Order M. Scott Phillips. atrical business,” his Water Drinker was only a “so-called novel,” and his other books showed him to be a “hack ...

Author: M. Scott Phillips

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817354572

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 139

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The essays gathered together in Volume 15 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium investigate how, historically, the theatre has been perceived both as a source of moral anxiety and as an instrument of moral and social reform. Essays consider, among other subjects, ethnographic depictions of the savage “other” in Buffalo Bill’s engagement at the Columbian Exposition of 1893; the so-called “Moral Reform Melodrama” in the nineteenth century; charity theatricals and the ways they negotiated standards of middle-class respectability; the figure of the courtesan as a barometer of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century moral and sexual discourse; Aphra Behn’s subversion of Restoration patriarchal sexual norms in The Feigned Courtesans; and the controversy surrounding one production of Tony Kushner Angels in America, during which officials at one of the nation’s more prominent liberal arts colleges attempted to censor the production, a chilling reminder that academic and artistic freedom cannot be taken for granted in today’s polarized moral and political atmosphere.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 16

21. Fielding, Complete Works, 4:236. 22. Although not technically the last play he ever wrote, Earydice Hiss'd was the last play Fielding ever produced. 23.

Author: Jay Malarcher

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817355104

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 137

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Comedy Tonight! in Volume 16 of the annual journal Theatre Symposium illustrate well the range of material that falls under the heading "comedy" as it is played on stage.
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Theatre Symposium Vol 26

His essay “The Miracle on 23rd: Examining the Vitality of the St. Louis Black Repertory as One of the Premier Black Theatres of the 21st Century” appears in ...

Author: Sarah McCarroll

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370138

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 144

View: 456

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A substantive exploration of theatrical costume Stage costumes reveal character. They tell audiences who the character is or how a character functions within the world of the play, among other things. Theatrical costuming, however, along with other forms of theatre design, has often been considered merely a craft, rather than part of the deeply systemic creation of meaning onstage. In what ways do our clothes shape and reveal our habits of behavior? How do stage costumes work to reveal one kind of habit via the manipulation of another? How might theatre practitioners learn to most effectively exploit this dynamic? Theatre Symposium, Volume 26 analyzes the ways in which meaning is conveyed through costuming for the stage and explores the underlying assumptions embedded in theatrical practice and costume production. THEATRE SYMPOSIUM, VOLUME 26 MICHELE MAJER Plus que Reine: The Napoleonic Revival in Belle Epoque Theatre and Fashion CAITLIN QUINN Creating a Realistic Rendering Pedagogy: The Fashion Illustration Problem ALY RENEE AMIDEI Where'd I Put My Character?: The Costume Character Body and Essential Costuming for the Ensemble Actor KYLA KAZUSCHYK Embracing the Chaos: Creating Costumes for Devised Work DAVID S. THOMPSON Dressing the Image: Costumes in Printed Theatrical Advertising LEAH LOWE Costuming the Audience: Gentility, Consumption, and the Lady’s Theatre Hat in Gilded Age America JORGE SANDOVAL The RuPaul Effect: The Exploration of the Costuming Rituals of Drag Culture in Social Media and the Theatrical Performativity of the Male Body in the Ambit of the Everyday GREGORY S. CARR A Brand New Day on Broadway: The Genius of Geoffrey Holder’s Artistry and His Intentional Evocation of the African Diaspora ANDREW GIBB On the [Historical] Sublime: J. R. Planché’s King John and the Romantic Ideal of the Past
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The Cosmic Spirit

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Wallace, Edward, ed. Theatre Symposium. Vol. 21, Ritual, Religion, and Theatre. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama ...

Author: Roland Faber

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725260696

Category: Religion

Page: 410

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Are we more than stardust? Is the appearance of the fragile Earth in the vast universe more than an accident? Are we not children of a Spirit that pervades the dust, rejuvenates life, and embraces the ever-evolving universe? Is there a cosmic Spirit that wants us to awaken to a consciousness of universal meaning, sacred purpose, and mutual friendship with all beings? This book answers these questions with a spirituality of the numinous in our relation to the elements of the Earth in the matrix of the multiverse by taking you on a journey through nine paths and nineteen meditations of awakening. Not bound by any religion, but in deep appreciation of the religious and spiritual heritage of human encounters with the divine depth of existence in our selves and in nature, they invite you to become sojourners by engaging the most profound embodiments of the intangible Spirit by which it facilitates its own materialization in the cosmos and our spiritualization of the cosmos. Use—says this Spirit—the stardust that you are to become a spirit-faring species in an eternal journey of the cosmos to realize its ultimate motive of existence—the attraction of love!
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Christoph Schlingensief

Staging Chaos, Performing Politics and Theatrical Phantasmagoria Anna Teresa Scheer ... Contemporary Theatre Review, Vol. 21, No. 1 (2011) pp. 100–102.

Author: Anna Teresa Scheer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350001060

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 245

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The first book to focus specifically on the late German artist Christoph Schlingensief's theatre work, it subversively merges art, politics and everyday life to imbue his productions both inside and outside the theatre with a re-energized concept of the political in art. Scheer traces Schlingensief's artistic lineage as a filmmaker with no formal training in theatre, whose work does not correspond to theoretical frameworks such as postdramatic theatre, Regietheater, or established categories of political theatre such as Brechtian, community, and agit-prop theatre. She explores how his work instead draws upon the highly performative gestures of the historical and post-Cold War avant-gardes as well the happenings and event-based practices of the sixties. Comprehensive case studies of six diverse theatrical and activist events are offered to demonstrate both the immediacy of Schlingensief's response to contemporary social and political events and his use of a range of artistic influences and different genres: Rocky Dutschke '68 (1996), Save Capitalism: Throw the Money Away! (1999) The Berlin Republic – or the Ring in Africa (1999) Hamlet (2001), Atta Atta – Art Has Broken Out! (2003) and the Church of Fear (2003). Key questions such as how his theatre functions as a provocation, and how an artist can insert themselves into the powerful flows of imagery produced by the perpetual global news cycle, form a coherent line of enquiry throughout each of the chapters. The significance of Schlingensief's artistic legacy of politicized theatre-making that pioneers new modes of active, aesthetic and public engagement in the political realm remains pertinent to topical socio-political debates and is of relevance to an international audience across a diversity of disciplines.
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Discovering a New Audience for Theatre

In 1972 the American Educational Theatre Association (AETA) changed its name to ... on the International Conference of Theatre for Children-May 13-21, 1964.

Author: Nat Eek

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN: 9780865346604

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 348

View: 112

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Eek presents the history of the International Association of Theatre for Children and Youth (ASSITEJ) from its founding in 1965 to present day. (Performing Arts)
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Shakespeare and the Live Theatre Broadcast Experience

Theatre Symposium Vol.19: Theatre and Film, Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, ... 1959)', Screenplays: Theatre Plays on Television, 21 May, ...

Author:

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350030473

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 353

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This ground breaking collection of essays is the first to examine the phenomenon of how, in the twenty-first century, Shakespeare has been experienced as a 'live' or 'as-live' theatre broadcast by audiences around the world. Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience explores the precursors of this phenomenon and its role in Shakespeare's continuing globalization. It considers some of the most important companies that have produced such broadcasts since 2009, including NT Live, Globe on Screen, RSC Live from Stratford-upon-Avon, Stratford Festival HD, Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company Live, and Cheek by Jowl, and examines the impact these broadcasts have had on branding, ideology, style and access to Shakespeare for international audiences. Contributors from around the world reflect on how broadcasts impact on actors' performances, changing viewing practices, local and international Shakespearean fan cultures and the use of social media by audience members for whom “liveness” is increasingly tied up in the experience economy. The book tackles vexing questions regarding the 'presentness' and 'liveness' of performance in the 21st century, the reception of Shakespeare in a globally-connected environment, the challenges of sustaining an audience for stage Shakespeare, and the ideological implications of consuming theatre on screen. It will be crucial reading for scholars of the 'live' theatre broadcast, and enormously helpful for scholars of Shakespeare on screen and in performance more broadly.
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Theatre History Studies 2014 Vol 33

Theatres of War Elizabeth Reitz Mullenix. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. ... Nineteenth Century Charity Theatricals,” Theatre Symposium 15 (2007): 52–53.

Author: Elizabeth Reitz Mullenix

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817358075

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 143

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Theatre History Studies 2014, Volume 33, brings together an original collection of essays that explore a topic of growing interest--theatre and war.
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Theatre Fiction in Britain from Henry James to Doris Lessing

Empty Houses: Theatrical Failure and the Novel. ... Theatre Symposium, vol. ... PMLA, vol. 113, no. 3, May 1998, pp. 408–21. Puchner, Martin.

Author: Graham Wolfe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000124361

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 204

View: 557

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This volume posits and explores an intermedial genre called theatre-fiction, understood in its broadest sense as referring to novels and stories that engage in concrete and sustained ways with theatre. Though theatre has made star appearances in dozens of literary fictions, including many by modern history’s most influential authors, no full-length study has dedicated itself specifically to theatre-fiction—in fact there has not even been a recognized name for the phenomenon. Focusing on Britain, where most of the world’s theatre-novels have been produced, and commencing in the late-nineteenth century, when theatre increasingly took on major roles in novels, Theatre-Fiction in Britain argues for the benefits of considering these works in relation to each other, to a history of development, and to the theatre of their time. New modes of intermedial analysis are modelled through close studies of Henry James, Somerset Maugham, Virginia Woolf, J. B. Priestley, Ngaio Marsh, Angela Carter, and Doris Lessing, all of whom were deeply involved in the theatre-world as playwrights, directors, reviewers, and theorists. Drawing as much on theatre scholarship as on literary theory, Theatre-Fiction in Britain presents theatre-fiction as one of the past century’s most vital means of exploring, reconsidering, and bringing forth theatre’s potentials.
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