Thomas Becket

Based on the critical examination of manuscripts and texts, this collection focuses first on the papal curia and Becket's household in exile.

Author: Anne Duggan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: UOM:39015070731685

Category: Art

Page: 368

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Thomas Becket's life was lived on a European stage, his cause was conducted in a European setting, and the cult of the new martyr spread with extraordinary rapidity to the furthest reaches of Latin Christendom before the end of the twelfth century. Based on the critical examination of manuscripts and texts, this collection focuses first on the papal curia and Becket's household in exile. Studies deal with Becket's letters and their authorship and trace the explosion of Becket's cult, the transmission of hagiographical and liturgical texts to France, Germany, and Portugal, and the role of diverse agencies of dissemination.
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Thomas Becket

Based on the critical examination of manuscripts and texts, this collection focuses first on the papal curia and Becket's household in exile.

Author: Anne J Duggan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138382345

Category:

Page: 368

View: 729

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Becket's life was lived on a European stage, his cause was conducted in a European setting, and the cult of the new martyr spread with extraordinary rapidity to the furthest reaches of Latin Christendom before the end of the twelfth century. The fifteen studies collected here reflect not only the global reach of the subject but the diverse expertise of their author, whose edition and translation of the Correspondence of Archbishop Thomas Becket (2000) and acclaimed biography (Thomas Becket, 2004) have established her place in Becket studies. Based on the critical examination of manuscripts and texts, this collection focuses first on the papal curia and Becket's household in exile. The following studies deal with Becket's letters and their authorship, the coronation of the young King Henry (1170), and Henry II's reconciliation at Avranches (1172). The final part traces the explosion of Becket's cult, the transmission of hagiographical and liturgical texts to France, Germany, and Portugal, and the role of diverse agencies of dissemination: Henry II's daughters, for example, in Saxony, Castile, and Sicily, and the Cistercian and Augustinian orders whose networks of houses embraced the whole of Europe.
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The Cult of Thomas Becket

Reprinted in A. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult. Aldershot, 2007, XI. ———. “The Coronation of the Young King in 1170,” in A. Duggan, ed., Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Text and Cult. Aldershot, 2007, VI.

Author: Kay Brainerd Slocum

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351593380

Category: Religion

Page: 340

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On 29 December, 1170, Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, was brutally murdered in his own cathedral. News of the event was rapidly disseminated throughout Europe, generating a widespread cult which endured until the reign of Henry VIII in the sixteenth century, and engendering a fascination which has lasted until the present day. The Cult of Thomas Becket: History and Historiography through Eight Centuries contributes to the lengthy debate surrounding the saint by providing a historiographical analysis of the major themes in Becket scholarship, tracing the development of Becket studies from the writings of the twelfth-century biographers to those of scholars of the twenty-first century. The book offers a thorough commentary and analysis which demonstrates how the Canterbury martyr was viewed by writers of previous generations as well as our own, showing how they were influenced by the intellectual trends and political concerns of their eras, and indicating how perceptions of Thomas Becket have changed over time. In addition, several chapters are devoted a discussion of artworks in various media devoted to the saint, as well as liturgies and sermons composed in his honor. Combining a wide historical scope with detailed textual analysis, this book will be of great interest to scholars of medieval religious history, art history, liturgy, sanctity and hagiography.
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The Cult of St Thomas Becket in the Plantagenet World C 1170 c 1220

I, 265–90; repr. with the same pagination in Duggan, Friends, Networks, no. VII A. J. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts, and Cult (Aldershot, 2007) A. [J.] Duggan, Thomas Becket (London, 2004) English Historical Review ...

Author: Paul Webster

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781783271610

Category: History

Page: 270

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The extraordinary growth and development of the cult of St Thomas Becket is investigated here, with a particular focus on its material culture.
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The Medieval Gift and the Classical Tradition

St Thomas Cantilupe Bishop of Hereford: Essays in His Honour (Hereford, 1982), 21–44, repr. in Duggan, Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult, 21–44. 'John of Salisbury and Thomas Becket', in Wilks (ed.), World of John of Salisbury, 427–38.

Author: Lars Kj'r

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108424028

Category: History

Page: 236

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This interdisciplinary study explores how classical ideals of generosity influenced the writing and practice of gift giving in medieval Europe. In assuming that medieval gift giving was shaped by oral 'folk models', historians have traditionally followed in the footsteps of social anthropologists and sociologists such as Marcel Mauss and Pierre Bourdieu. This first in-depth investigation into the influence of the classical ideals of generosity and gift giving in medieval Europe reveals to the contrary how historians have underestimated the impact of classical literature and philosophy on medieval culture and ritual. Focusing on the idea of the gift expounded in the classical texts read most widely in the Middle Ages, including Seneca the Younger's De beneficiis and Cicero's De officiis, Lars Kj'r investigates how these ideas were received, adapted and utilised by medieval writers across a range of genres, and how they influenced the practice of generosity.
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Henry the Young King 1155 1183

... Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (Aldershot, 2007), 643–58 Thomas Becket (London, 2004) —— 'The Price of Loyalty: The Fate of Thomas Becket's Learned Household', Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts (Aldershot, ...

Author: Matthew Strickland

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300215519

Category: Great Britain

Page: 472

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This first modern study of Henry the Young King, eldest son of Henry II but the least known Plantagenet monarch, explores the brief but eventful life of the only English ruler after the Norman Conquest to be created co-ruler in his father's lifetime. Crowned at fifteen to secure an undisputed succession, Henry played a central role in the politics of Henry II's great empire and was hailed as the embodiment of chivalry. Yet, consistently denied direct rule, the Young King was provoked first into heading a major rebellion against his father, then to waging a bitter war against his brother Richard for control of Aquitaine, dying before reaching the age of thirty having never assumed actual power. In this remarkable history, Matthew Strickland provides a richly colored portrait of an all-but-forgotten royal figure tutored by Thomas Becket, trained in arms by the great knight William Marshal, and incited to rebellion by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, while using his career to explore the nature of kingship, succession, dynastic politics, and rebellion in twelfth-century England and France.
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Canterbury

Simultaneously, the formal cult of St Thomas the Martyr was being introduced across the length and breadth of ... repr. with the same pagination in eadem, Thomas Becket: friends, networks, texts, and cult (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007), no.

Author: Catherine Royer-Hemet

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443826082

Category: History

Page: 230

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Between the Celtic tribe of the Iron Age—the Cantiaci—and the twenty-first-century inhabitants of Canterbury, three millenia stand during which the city has enjoyed unparalleled fame, particularly since it became the religious heart of the country in AD 597. While ambling through the streets of modern Canterbury, one is able to—if careful enough to do so—get the feel of the medieval city. There must be reasons for that enduring impact of the past and it might be because of the overwhelming wealth of people who have left their mark as well as events of momentous importance that took place there. Canterbury: A Medieval City will take the reader on a trip through time, space and history, as well as literature. It will enable him to apprehend the magnitude of the history of the place and the reasons why Canterbury has become the magnet it is nowadays for people from all over the world, the “mecca for tourists” as it is advertised on some websites. While illustrious figures are dealt with in the articles contained in the book, such as Saint Augustine, Thomas Becket, and Geoffrey Chaucer—who account for the renown of the place and have indeed helped to shape national identity—it is also possible to catch a glimpse of the less notorious personalities and facts that have also worked to give Canterbury its deeply ingrained identity: people like priors, as well as the many different ways which the city functioned.
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The Secular Clergy in England 1066 1216

Thomas Becket. London, 2004. Duggan, Anne. “The Price of Loyalty: The Fate of Thomas Becket's Learned Household.” In Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts, and Cult, edited by Anne Duggan, 1–18. Aldershot, 2007. Duggan, Anne.

Author: Hugh M. Thomas

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191007019

Category: History

Page: 480

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The secular clergy - priests and other clerics outside of monastic orders - were among the most influential and powerful groups in European society during the central Middle Ages. The secular clergy got their title from the Latin word for world, saeculum, and secular clerics kept the Church running in the world beyond the cloister wall, with responsibility for the bulk of pastoral care and ecclesiastical administration. This gave them enormous religious influence, although they were considered too worldly by many contemporary moralists - trying, for instance, to oppose the elimination of clerical marriage and concubinage. Although their worldliness created many tensions, it also gave the secular clergy much worldly influence. Contemporaries treated elite secular clerics as equivalent to knights, and some were as wealthy as minor barons. Secular clerics had a huge role in the rise of royal bureaucracy, one of the key historical developments of the period. They were instrumental to the intellectual and cultural flowering of the twelfth century, the rise of the schools, the creation of the book trade, and the invention of universities. They performed music, produced literature in a variety of genres and languages, and patronized art and architecture. Indeed, this volume argues that they contributed more than any other group to the Twelfth-Century Renaissance. Yet the secular clergy as a group have received almost no attention from scholars, unlike monks, nuns, or secular nobles. In The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, Hugh Thomas aims to correct this deficiency through a major study of the secular clergy below the level of bishop in England from 1066 to 1216.
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Saint Margaret Queen of the Scots

For primary sources regarding Thomas Becket, see: his vitae and miracle collections in Materials for the History of ... Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts, and Cult (Aldershot, UK and Burlington, VT: Ashgate/ Variorum, 2007).

Author: C. Keene

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137035646

Category: History

Page: 326

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Margaret, saint and 11th-century Queen of the Scots, remains an often-cited yet little-understood historical figure. Keene's analysis of sources in terms of both time and place – including her Life of Saint Margaret , translated for the first time – allows for an informed understanding of the forces that shaped this captivating woman.
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The Book in the Cathedral

History of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, London (Rolls Series), seven volumes, 1875–85. For the cult, I read the essays of Anne J. Duggan gathered in her Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult, Aldershot and ...

Author: Christopher de Hamel

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141994253

Category: Art

Page: 64

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From the bestselling author of Meetings With Remarkable Manuscripts, a captivating account of the last surviving relic of Thomas Becket The assassination of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral on 29 December 1170 is one of the most famous events in European history. It inspired the largest pilgrim site in medieval Europe and many works of literature from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to T. S. Eliot's Murder in the Cathedral and Anouilh's Becket. In a brilliant piece of historical detective work, Christopher de Hamel here identifies the only surviving relic from Becket's shrine: the Anglo-Saxon Psalter which he cherished throughout his time as Archbishop of Canterbury, and which he may even have been holding when he was murdered. Beautifully illustrated and published to coincide with the 850th anniversary of the death of Thomas Becket, this is an exciting rediscovery of one of the most evocative artefacts of medieval England.
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Medieval Art Architecture Archaeology at Canterbury

... Setting of the Becket Translation of 1220', in Studies in Church History, 30 (1993), 127–39; and the collection of studies by Anne Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (London Variorum Collected Studies 2007). 7.

Author: Alixe Bovey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351558617

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

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"From the time of the foundation of its cathedral in 597, Canterbury has been the epicentre of Britain's ecclesiastical history, and an exceptionally important centre for architectural and visual innovation. Focusing especially but not exclusively on Christ Church cathedral, this legacy is explored in seventeen essays concerned with Canterbury's art, architecture and archaeology between the early Anglo-Saxon period and the close of the middle ages. Papers consider the relationship between between architectural setting and liturgical practice, and between stationary and movable fittings, while fresh insights are offered into the aesthetic, spiritual, and pragmatic considerations that shaped the fabric of Christ Church and St Augustine's abbey, alongside critical reflections on Canterbury's historiography and relationship to the wider world. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the richness of the surviving material, and its enduring ability to raise new questions.
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Pope Celestine III 1191 1198

Quotations and Allusions in the Correspondence of Thomas Becket: an investigation of their sources«, in Viator, 32 (2001), 1¥22; repr. with the same pagination in eadem, Thomas Becket: friends, networks, texts, and cult (Aldershot, ...

Author: John Doran

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351910095

Category: History

Page: 388

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Hyacinth Bobone (c. 1105-1198) was one of the great figures of twelfth-century Europe. Active in the Roman Curia from the 1120s, a student in Paris, and associated with both Peter Abelard and Arnold of Brescia, he was made cardinal deacon of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in 1144 and served there during forty-seven years before being elected as pope in 1191. As curial cardinal and as papal legate in France, Spain, Portugal and the Empire, he was deeply involved in many of the major political conflicts and ecclesiastical reforms of his time. As pope, he contended with formidable secular rulers and serious setbacks for the crusading movement. His pontificate saw particularly notable developments in the fields of canon law and canonization policy, while his Roman origins influenced his artistic patronage in Rome and his attitude to the city's Jews. Yet this remarkable pope has been overshadowed by his celebrated successor, Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) and there has been no full-length study of his life since 1905. The fourteen studies presented here offer a fresh look at Hyacinth's early life in Rome, Paris and as legate, explain his relationship as cardinal and pope with the Christian kings, examine his promotion of the crusade in the Holy Land, on the Baltic Frontier and in the Iberian Peninsula, and analyze his role as pastor and reformer. These articles, written by leading experts in their respective fields, inform us not only on the life of an exceptional churchman but also of the vibrant and rapidly changing times in which he lived.
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A Companion to John of Salisbury

145 Anne J. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (Aldershot, 2007), IX. Two miracles associated with aqua sanctificata were reported on the Continent at around the time of John's letter, but one occurred in Normandy ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004282940

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 102

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The Companion to John of Salisbury provides an overall introduction to the place of John of Salisbury in the political debates of twelfth-century England and the history of the Church, as well as to his philosophical work, his political thought and his writing of history
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New Legends of England

21-44. ———“Lyell Version of the Quadrilogus Life of st. Thomas of Canterbury.” Analecta Bollandiana 112 (1994): 105–38. ———. Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult. New York: routledge, 2007. dunn-Lardeau, Brenda, ed.

Author: Catherine Sanok

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812249828

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 360

View: 232

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New Legends of England examines a previously unrecognized phenomenon of fifteenth-century English literary culture: the proliferation of vernacular Lives of British, Anglo-Saxon, and other native saints. Catherine Sanok argues these texts use literary experimentation to explore overlapping forms of secular and religious community.
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The Crusades and Visual Culture

Meryl Jancey (Hereford: Friends of Hereford Cathedral Publications, 1982), pp. 21–44; reprinted in Anne Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007), Chapter IX. 46 See James Brundage, “Crusades, ...

Author: LauraJ Whatley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351545259

Category: Art

Page: 286

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The crusades, whether realized or merely planned, had a profound impact on medieval and early modern societies. Numerous scholars in the fields of history and literature have explored the influence of crusading ideas, values, aspirations and anxieties in both the Latin States and Europe. However, there have been few studies dedicated to investigating how the crusading movement influenced and was reflected in medieval visual cultures. Written by scholars from around the world working in the domains of art history and history, the essays in this volume examine the ways in which ideas of crusading were realized in a broad variety of media (including manuscripts, cartography, sculpture, mural paintings, and metalwork). Arguing implicitly for recognition of the conceptual frameworks of crusades that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries, the volume explores the pervasive influence and diverse expression of the crusading movement from the twelfth through the fifteenth centuries.
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A History of the Church in the Middle Ages

Reconciliation at Avranches, 21 May 1172', English Historical Review 115 (2000), 643–58, which, with other relevant papers of hers, is reprinted in Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (Aldershot, Hants., 2007).

Author: F Donald Logan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136315978

Category: History

Page: 360

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"Conceptually well organized, stylistically clear, intellectually thoughtful, and pedagogically useful." - Thomas Head, Speculum "For its humane and learned approach to its enormous canvas, as well as for the cogency with which it penetrates at speed to the essentials of a vanished historical epoch, this History of the Church in the Middle Ages deserves a very wide audience indeed." - Barrie Dobson, English Historical Review "To have written a scholarly and very readable history of the Western Church over a millennium is a remarkable tour de force, for which Donald Logan is to be warmly congratulated." - C.H Lawrence, The Tablet "A feat of historical synthesis, most confident in its telling of the coming of Christianity. Books like Logan's are needed more than ever before." - Miri Rubin, TLS In this fascinating survey, F. Donald Logan introduces the reader to the Christian church, from the conversion of the Celtic and Germanic peoples to the discovery of the New World. He reveals how the church unified the people of Western Europe as they worshipped with the same ceremonies and used Latin as the language of civilized communication. From remote, rural parish to magnificent urban cathedral, A History of the Church in the Middle Ages explores the role of the church as a central element in determining a thousand years of history. This new edition brings the book right up to date with recent scholarship, and includes an expanded introduction exploring the interaction of other faiths - particularly Judaism and Islam - with the Christian church.
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The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Christianity

Middeleeuwse Studies en Bronnen 41 (Hilversum: Verloren, 1994), 438, a text circulating in southern Germany and ... for Becket's Murder', in A. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (Aldershot: Ashgate/ Variorium, ...

Author: John Arnold

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 9780199582136

Category: History

Page: 580

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This volume brings together the latest scholarship on the beliefs, practices, and institutions of the Christian Church between 400 and 1500 AD. The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Christianity is about the beliefs, practices, and institutions of the Roman Church between 400 and 1500AD, and brings together in one volume a host of cutting-edge analysis. The book does not primarily provide a chronological narrative, but rather seeks to demonstrate the variety, change, and complexity of religion across this long period, and the numerous different ways in which modern scholarship can approach it. It presents the work of thirty academic authors, from the US, the UK, and Europe, addressing topics that range from early medieval monasticism to late medieval mysticism, from the material wealth of the Church to the spiritual exercises through which certain believers might attempt to improve their souls. Each chapter tells a story, but seeks also to ask how and why "Christianity" took on a particular shape at a particular moment, paying attention to both the spiritual and otherwordly aspects of religion, and the very material and political contexts in which they were often embedded. The book aims to be an indispensable guide to future discussion in the field--Publisher description.
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The Historians of Angevin England

Discussed by Colmán Ó Clabaigh and Michael Staunton, 'Thomas Becket and Ireland', in Listen, O Isles, Unto Me: Studies ... 1998), i, 265–90; repr. in Anne J. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Texts and Cult (London, 2007), vii.

Author: Michael Staunton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191082641

Category: History

Page: 432

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The Historians of Angevin England is a study of the explosion of creativity in historical writing in England in the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries, and what this tells us about the writing of history in the middle ages. Many of those who wrote history under the Angevin kings of England chose as their subject the events of their own time, and explained that they did so simply because their own times were so interesting and eventful. This was the age of Henry II and Thomas Becket, Eleanor of Aquitaine and Richard the Lionheart, the invasion of Ireland and the Third Crusade, and our knowledge and impression of the period is to a great extent based on these contemporary histories. The writers in question - Roger of Howden, Ralph of Diceto, William of Newburgh, Gerald of Wales, and Gervase of Canterbury, to name a few - wrote history that is not quite like anything written in England before. Remarkable for its variety, its historical and literary quality, its use of evidence and its narrative power, this has been called a 'golden age' of historical writing in England. The Historians of Angevin England, the first volume to address the subject, sets out to illustrate the historiographical achievements of this period, and to provide a sense of how these writers wrote, and their idea of history. But it is also about how medieval intellectuals thought and wrote about a range of topics: the rise and fall of kings, victory and defeat in battle, church and government, and attitudes to women, heretics, and foreigners.
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John of Salisbury and the medieval Roman renaissance

42 A. Duggan, Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Text and Cult (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007); Thomas Becket (London: Bloomsbury, 2004); The Correspondence of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury 1162–70, ed. and trans. A. Duggan (2 vols; ...

Author: Irene O'Daly

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526109521

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

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This book is a detailed but accessible treatment of the political thought of John of Salisbury, a twelfth-century author and educationalist who rose from a modest background to become Bishop of Chartres. It shows how aspects of John's thought – such as his views on political cooperation and virtuous rulership – were inspired by the writings of Roman philosophers, notably Cicero and Seneca. Investigating how John accessed and adapted the classics, the book argues that he developed a hybrid political philosophy by taking elements from Roman Stoic sources and combining them with insights from patristic writings. By situating his ideas in their political and intellectual context, it offers a reassessment of John’s political thought, as well as a case study in classical reception of relevance to students and scholars of political philosophy and the history of ideas.
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The Conquest of Santar m and Goswin s Song of the Conquest of Alc cer do Sal

The two texts treated in these pages are indispensable sources for the formative years of the sovereign kingdom of ... and the Cult of St Thomas Becket at Lorvão, Alcobaça and Tomar', in Thomas Becket: Friends, Networks, Text and Cult, ...

Author: Jonathan Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000384673

Category: History

Page: 200

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Achieved at the height of the Crusades, the Christian conquests of Santarém in 1147 by King Afonso I, and of Alcácer do Sal in 1217 by Portuguese forces and northern European warriors on their way by sea to Palestine, were crucial events in the creation of the independent kingdom of Portugal. The two texts presented here survive in their unique, thirteenth-century manuscript copies appended to a codex belonging to one of Europe’s most important monastic library collections accumulated in the Cistercian abbey of Alcobaça, founded c. 1153 by Bernard of Clairvaux. Accompanied by comprehensive introductions and here translated into English for the first time, these extraordinary texts are based on eyewitness testimony of the conquests. They contain much detail for the military historian, including data on operational tactics and the ideology of Christian holy war in the twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. Literary historians too will be delighted by the astonishing styles deployed, demonstrating considerable authorial flamboyance, flair and innovation. While they are likely written by Goswin of Bossut, the search for authorship yields an impressive array of literary friends and associates, including James of Vitry, Thomas of Cantimpré, Oliver of Paderborn and Caesarius of Heisterbach.
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