Three Roads to Chihuahua

A study of three trade routes between the United States and Mexico, in use during the mid 1800s.

Author: Roy L. Swift

Publisher:

ISBN: 0890156409

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 638

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A study of three trade routes between the United States and Mexico, in use during the mid 1800s
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The US Army and the Texas Frontier Economy

32 , serial 562 , 5-19 ; Trass , From the Golden Gate , 149-50 ; Goetzmann , Army Exploration , 149-52 . 7. John C. Hays to Hon . W. Marcy , Dec. 13 , 1848 , in Trass , From the Golden Gate , 299– 301 ; Swift , Three Roads to Chihuahua ...

Author: Thomas T. Smith

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 0890968829

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 307

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Seventy million dollars in fifty-five years. From Texas' annexation in 1845 until the turn of the twentieth century, the U.S. Army pumped at least that much or more into the economy of the fledgling state, a fact that directly challenges the popular heritage of Texas as the state with roots of pioneer capitalism and fervent independence. In The U.S. Army and the Texas Frontier Economy, 1845-1900, Thomas T. Smith sheds light on just who bankrolled the evolution of Texas into viable statehood. Smith draws on extensive research gathered from both government archives and Texas army posts in order to evaluate the symbiotic relationship between army quartermasters and the economy of the young state. Texas was the army's largest--and most costly--engagement, absorbing up to thirty percent of the total operating budget and channeling that currency into the commercial development of its frontier. Smith expands on historian Robert Wooster's theory that the military was engaged in an alliance with the political authority in Texas, and using documents such as army contracts for freighting, foraging, and fort leasing, he illustrates how federal fiscal activity spurred commercial growth for the citizens of Texas. Besides the obvious development of towns on the skirts of military bases and of roads between them, the establishment of military spending as a bedrock of the Texas economy and the protector of middle class interests shaped the future of the state's commercial prosperity. Writing with exceptional detail and clarity, Smith traces the emergence of the army's influence and includes analyses of information on army spending and development such as the introduction of army weather and telegraph services to the state, as well as accounts of real estate transactions involving the fort building program. Smith also accounts for army failures, maintaining that no one was truly prepared for the reality of western expansion. As an examination of the complex yet mutually beneficial economic relationship between the nation and the state, The U.S. Army and the Texas Frontier Economy, 1845-1900 is ideal for anyone interested in the early days of the state as well as in U.S. military and frontier history.
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War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier 1830 1880

Siglo Diez y Nueve, May 3, 1842, and editorial, March 5, 1842, p. 4. 16. ... Swift and Corning, Three Roads to Chihuahua, 36 (quotation); Morgenthaler, River Has Never Divided Us, 35. 29. Swift and Corning, Three Roads to Chihuahua, 40.

Author: Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806166803

Category: History

Page: 508

View: 443

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The historical record of the Rio Grande valley through much of the nineteenth century reveals well-documented violence fueled by racial hatred, national rivalries, lack of governmental authority, competition for resources, and an international border that offered refuge to lawless men. Less noted is the region’s other everyday reality, one based on coexistence and cooperation among Mexicans, Anglo-Americans, and the Native Americans, African Americans, and Europeans who also inhabited the borderlands. War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830–1880 is a history of these parallel worlds focusing on a border that gave rise not only to violent conflict but also cooperation and economic and social advancement. Meeting here are the Anglo-Americans who came to the border region to trade, spread Christianity, and settle; Mexicans seeking opportunity in el norte; Native Americans who raided American and Mexican settlements alike for plunder and captives; and Europeans who crisscrossed the borderlands seeking new futures in a fluid frontier space. Historian Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga draws on national archives, letters, consular records, periodicals, and a host of other sources to give voice to borderlanders’ perspectives as he weaves their many, varied stories into one sweeping narrative. The tale he tells is one of economic connections and territorial disputes, of refugees and bounty hunters, speculation and stakeholding, smuggling and theft and other activities in which economic considerations often carried more weight than racial prejudice. Spanning the Anglo settlement of Texas in the 1830s, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas , the US-Mexican War, various Indian wars, the US Civil War, the French intervention into Mexico, and the final subjugation of borderlands Indians by the combined forces of the US and Mexican armies, this is a magisterial work that forever alters, complicates, and enriches borderlands history. Published in association with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas
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The River Has Never Divided Us

Report, French to Smith, Santa Fe New Mexican (weekly), May 7, 1864; Swift and Corning, Three Roads to Chihuahua, 200. French refers to Cottonwood Spring as "Alamo Spring." Alamo is the Spanish word for "cottonwood.

Author: Jefferson Morgenthaler

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292778689

Category: Social Science

Page: 355

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Not quite the United States and not quite Mexico, La Junta de los Rios straddles the border between Texas and Chihuahua, occupying the basin formed by the conjunction of the Rio Grande and the Rio Conchos. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the Chihuahuan Desert, ranking in age and dignity with the Anasazi pueblos of New Mexico. In the first comprehensive history of the region, Jefferson Morgenthaler traces the history of La Junta de los Rios from the formation of the Mexico-Texas border in the mid-19th century to the 1997 ambush shooting of teenage goatherd Esquiel Hernandez by U.S. Marines performing drug interdiction in El Polvo, Texas. "Though it is scores of miles from a major highway, I found natives, soldiers, rebels, bandidos, heroes, scoundrels, drug lords, scalp hunters, medal winners, and mystics," writes Morgenthaler. "I found love, tragedy, struggle, and stories that have never been told." In telling the turbulent history of this remote valley oasis, he examines the consequences of a national border running through a community older than the invisible line that divides it.
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Camino del Norte

3 (1953–54); Elizabeth Ann Harper, “The Taovaya Indians in Frontier Trade and Diplomacy, 1769 –1779,”Southwestern Historical ... 1967); Roy L. Swift and Leavitt Corning Jr., Three Roads to Chihuahua (Austin: Eakin Press, 1988). Map 6.

Author: Howard J. Erlichman

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585444731

Category: History

Page: 296

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Some five hundred miles of superhighway run between the Rio Grande and the Red River—present-day Interstate 35. This towering achievement of modern transportation engineering links a string of Texas metropolises and some 7.7 million people, and yet it all evolved from a series of humble little trails. The I-35 Corridor that runs north-south through Texas connects Dallas and Fort Worth with Austin, San Antonio, and Laredo en route to ancient towns in Mexico. Along its path lie urban centers, technology parks, parking lots, strip malls, apartment complexes, and vast open spaces. In this fascinating popular history, based on extensive primary and secondary research, Howard J. Erlichman asks how and why the Camino del Norte (the Northern Road) developed as (and where) it did. He uncovers, dissects, prioritizes, and repackages layer upon layer of centuries-spanning history to, in his words, "solve the mystery of I-35." His chronicle focuses less on the physical placement of I-35 than on the reasons it was created: the founding of posts and villages and the early development of towns. Along the way, he explores a number of circumstances that contributed to the location and development of the corridor: pre-Columbian cultures, Mexican silver mining, road and bridge building techniques, Indian tribes, railroad developments, military affairs, car culture, and pavement technology, to name a few. Presently, a variety of new highway projects are underway to address the dramatic expansion of I-35 traffic generated by population growth and business enterprise. Those interested in the economic development of the state of Texas, in NAFTA links and their precursors, and in touring the Interstate itself will find this book informative and useful.
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The Texas Rangers

Roy L. Swift, Three Roads to Chihuahua: The Great Wagon Roads That Opened the Southwest, 1823–1883 (Austin: Eakin Press, 1988), pp. 157, 158, 163–66; A Twentieth Century History of Southwest Texas (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1907), ...

Author: Mike Cox

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 1429941421

Category: History

Page: 496

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Texas writer/historian Mike Cox explores the inception and rise of the famed Texas Rangers. Starting in 1821 with just a handful of men, the Rangers' first purpose was to keep settlers safe from the feared and gruesome Karankawa Indians, a cannibalistic tribe that wandered the Texas territory. As the influx of settlers grew, the attacks increased and it became clear that a much larger, better trained force was necessary. From their tumultuous beginning to their decades of fighting outlaws, Comanche, Mexican soldados and banditos, as well as Union soldiers, the Texas Rangers became one of the fiercest law enforcement groups in America. In a land as spread-out and sparsely populated as the west itself, the Rangers had unique law-enforcement responsibilities and challenges. The story of the Texas Rangers is as controversial as it is heroic. Often accused of vigilante-style racism and murder, they enforced the law with a heavy hand. But above all they were perhaps the defining force for the stabilization and the creation of Texas. From Stephen Austin in the early days through the Civil War, the first eighty years of the Texas Rangers is nothing less then phenomenal, and the efforts put forth in those days set the foundation for the Texas Rangers that keep Texas safe today. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
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The Carriage Journal

192, quoted in Roy L. Swift, Three Roads to Chihuahua (Austin,Texas: Eakin Press, 1988) pp. 270-271. Still offered in 1902 was the Mexican Freight Wagon, with “Clipped Gear” and “California Tire Rivets.” This wagon cost between $103.00 ...

Author: Jill Ryder

Publisher: Carriage Assoc. of America

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 48

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View from the Box 54 1992 CAA Restoration Competition Results 55 A Step in Time 57 Memories-Mostly Horsy 59 On Spring Curvature 61 Coach Horn Tunes 63 Driving Around the World 64 Trans-Mississippi Transport: Part V 66 George Abbott 70 The Tantivy Road Coach 71 Driving Double Harness 7 4 The Scottish Open Carriage Driving Trials 76 Everybody Loves a Parade 79 The Life of Spider Phaeton 81 In Memorium Charles W. Kellogg 82 Museum News 83 Questions and Answers 84 Book Reviews 85 The Carriage Trade
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Three Roads to Chihuahua

The great wagon roads that opened the southwest, 1823 to 1883

Author: Roy L. Swift

Publisher:

ISBN: 1571684093

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 214

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The great wagon roads that opened the southwest, 1823 to 1883
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Confederates and Comancheros

10, 1864, NA, RG 393, Pt. 3, DA, ULR 1862–70. 39. ... The Puerto del Paisano Road, first scouted by Capt. ... See Roy L. Swift and Leavitt Corning Jr., Three Roads to Chihuahua (Austin: Eakin Press, 1988), 356n60, (endnote quotation).

Author: James Bailey Blackshear

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806177274

Category: History

Page: 288

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A vast and desolate region, the Texas–New Mexico borderlands have long been an ideal setting for intrigue and illegal dealings—never more so than in the lawless early days of cattle trafficking and trade among the Plains tribes and Comancheros. This book takes us to the borderlands in the 1860s and 1870s for an in-depth look at Union-Confederate skullduggery amid the infamous Comanche-Comanchero trade in stolen Texas livestock. In 1862, the Confederates abandoned New Mexico Territory and Texas west of the Pecos River, fully expecting to return someday. Meanwhile, administered by Union troops under martial law, the region became a hotbed of Rebel exiles and spies, who gathered intelligence, disrupted federal supply lines, and plotted to retake the Southwest. Using a treasure trove of previously unexplored documents, authors James Bailey Blackshear and Glen Sample Ely trace the complicated network of relationships that drew both Texas cattlemen and Comancheros into these borderlands, revealing the urban elite who were heavily involved in both the legal and illegal transactions that fueled the region’s economy. Confederates and Comancheros deftly weaves a complex tale of Texan overreach and New Mexican resistance, explores cattle drives and cattle rustling, and details shady government contracts and bloody frontier justice. Peopled with Rebels and bluecoats, Comanches and Comancheros, Texas cattlemen and New Mexican merchants, opportunistic Indian agents and Anglo arms dealers, this book illustrates how central these contested borderlands were to the history of the American West.
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New Mexico Territory During the Civil War

Thompson, “Drama in the Desert: The Hunt for Henry Skillman in the Trans-Pecos, 1862–1864,” Password 38 (fall 1992): 107–26; Roy L. Swift, Three Roads to Chihuahua: The Great Wagon Roads That Opened the Southwest (Austin: Eakin Press, ...

Author: Henry Davies Wallen

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826344793

Category: History

Page: 304

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These inspection reports, edited by award-winning Civil War historian Thompson, provide unique insight into the military, cultural, and social life of a territory struggling to maintain law and order during the early Civil War years.
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