Translation and Creativity

Perspectives on Creative Writing and Translation Studies Manuela Perteghella, Eugenia Loffredo. research such as descriptivism and polysystem theory (see, for example, Holmes 1988; Even-Zohar 2000; Hermans 1999, 2002), has been, ...

Author: Manuela Perteghella

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441164339

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

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Translation and Creativity discusses the links between translation and creative writing from linguistic, cultural, and critical perspectives, through eleven chapters by established academics and practitioners. The relationship between translation and creative writing is brought into focus by theoretical, pedagogical, and practical applications, complemented by language-based illustrative examples. Innovative research and practice areas covered include ideas of self-translation and the 'spaces' of reading, mental 'black boxes' and cognition and the book introduces new concepts of transgeneric translation, pop translation and orthographical translation.
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Translation and Creativity

1998; Kemble and O'Sullivan 2006; and Perteghella and Loffredo 2006) have rethought this notion of translation as a subordinate activity 'in the light of “creativity”', as Loffredo and Perteghella (2006: 2) phrase it; but in this book, ...

Author: Kirsten Malmkjær

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317302551

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 130

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Kirsten Malmkjær argues that translating can and should be considered a valuable art form. Examining notions of creativity and their relationship with translation and focusing on how the originality of translation is manifest in texts, the author explores a range of texts and their translations, in order to illustrate original as opposed to derivative translation. With reference to thirty translators’ discourses on their source texts and the author’s own experience of translating a short text, Malmkjær explores the theory of creativity, philosophical aesthetics, the philosophy of language, experimental and theoretical translation studies, and translators’ discourses on their work. Showing the relevance of these varied topics to the study of translating and translations underlines their complexity and the immensity of understanding that is regularly invested in translations. This work proposes a complete rethinking of the concepts of creativity and originality, as applied to translation, and is vital reading for advanced students and researchers in translation studies and comparative literature.
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Translation and Creativity

Kirsten Malmkjær argues that translating can and should be considered a valuable art form.This work proposes a complete rethinking of the concepts of creativity and originality, as applied to translation and is vital reading for advanced ...

Author: Kirsten Malmkjaer

Publisher:

ISBN: 1138123269

Category: Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.)

Page: 134

View: 860

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Kirsten Malmkjær argues that translating can and should be considered a valuable art form. Examining notions of creativity and their relationship with translation and focusing on how the originality of translation is manifest in texts, the author explores a range of texts and their translations, in order to illustrate original as opposed to derivative translation. With reference to thirty translators' discourses on their source texts and the author's own experience of translating a short text, Malmkjær explores the theory of creativity, philosophical aesthetics, the philosophy of language, experimental and theoretical translation studies, and translators' discourses on their work. Showing the relevance of these varied topics to the study of translating and translations underlines their complexity and the immensity of understanding that is regularly invested in translations. This work proposes a complete rethinking of the concepts of creativity and originality, as applied to translation and is vital reading for advanced students and researchers in translation studies and comparative literature. y, as applied to translation and is vital reading for advanced students and researchers in translation studies and comparative literature.
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Lexis and Creativity in Translation

In this Chapter, we look at the translation into English of these creative loners, with a view to establishing whether or not they are normalized in the target language. The hapax forms investigated here are either creative ...

Author: Dorothy Kenny

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317640752

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 252

View: 330

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Computers offer new perspectives in the study of language, allowing us to see phenomena that previously remained obscure because of the limitations of our vantage points. It is not uncommon for computers to be likened to the telescope, or microscope, in this respect. In this pioneering computer-assisted study of translation, Dorothy Kenny suggests another image, that of the kaleidoscope: playful changes of perspective using corpus-processing software allow textual patterns to come into focus and then recede again as others take their place. And against the background of repeated patterns in a corpus, creative uses of language gain a particular prominence. In Lexis and Creativity in Translation, Kenny monitors the translation of creative source-text word forms and collocations uncovered in a specially constructed German-English parallel corpus of literary texts. Using an abundance of examples, she reveals evidence of both normalization and ingenious creativity in translation. Her discussion of lexical creativity draws on insights from traditional morphology, structural semantics and, most notably, neo-Firthian corpus linguistics, suggesting that rumours of the demise of linguistics in translation studies are greatly exaggerated. Lexis and Creativity in Translation is essential reading for anyone interested in corpus linguistics and its impact so far on translation studies. The book also offers theoretical and practical guidance for researchers who wish to conduct their own corpus-based investigations of translation. No previous knowledge of German, corpus linguistics or computing is assumed.
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Translators Strategies and Creativity

The authors argue that this is the essence of professional decision-making in translation according to Levy translation is a decision-making process and that translation teachers should help students develop an understanding of translation ...

Author: Ann Beylard-Ozeroff

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027216304

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 230

View: 174

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In their contributions the authors reflect upon Levy s thinking on translation as a communication process and on Popovi? s insistence on the importance of re-creating a text both at the surface and deep levels. Examples are drawn from literary translation, technical translation, from audio-visual translation and from interpreting, and the authors point out that translators in all domains inevitably come up against linguistic, textual and other constraints, which, if they are to be resolved successfully, call upon a translator s and interpreter s strategies and creativity. The authors argue that this is the essence of professional decision-making in translation according to Levy translation is a decision-making process and that translation teachers should help students develop an understanding of translation strategies and of the vital role that creativity plays throughout the translation/interpreting process.
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I don t translate I create

“I don’t translate, I create!” – This is the slogan of a translation agency called “Sternkopf Communications” located in Flöha, Germany.

Author: Vanessa Drexler

Publisher: diplom.de

ISBN: 9783954899777

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 122

View: 152

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“I don’t translate, I create!” – This is the slogan of a translation agency called “Sternkopf Communications” located in Flöha, Germany. The translators at this translation agency are specialized in the field of marketing and perceive creativeness their daily bread. But what does this actually mean – I don’t translate, I create? Undoubtedly, the translation of a text from one language into another is not an easy and straightforward process. On the contrary, the translator needs to invest much time and one or the other headache before a target text (TT) finally sounds natural, fluent, coherent and logical for the target audience. Different possible translation solutions will have to be considered, language as well as culture-related equivalents often are not easily at hand etc. Would it not be pleasant if machine translation (MT) was there to help with this process? Yet, despite the enormous importance of creativity in translating, computer-aided translation (CAT) tools are being used frequently by professional translators, not to replace but to support the translator in their daily business. CAT tools enable their users to translate in a more consistent way, since they search source texts for words, phrases or sentences that have already been translated before and stored in the TM so that the translator does not need to translate this text unit again ‘from scratch’. Considering that this process brings about what could be called ‘semi-mechanical’ TTs, the use of CAT tools seems to stand in stark contrast to the importance of creativity mentioned above. Thus, the question arises whether CAT tools influence the creative energy of translators and, if this is the case, whether translators regard this influence as rather positive or negative. In this context, it is also important to consider which fields of expertise generally demand a high degree of uniformity/consistency in translations and which subject fields generally allow for a high degree of creative freedom. Accordingly, this paper pursues two related purposes. The first is to compare five CAT tools in their degree of usability. The second purpose is to identify translators’ perspectives on uniformity and creativity in translations with the goal to shedding light on the question whether CAT tools generally tend to positively or negatively influence the translation process on a rather linguistic than technological basis.
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The Handbook of Translation and Cognition

Along the same lines, the study of creativity in translation studies initially places the focus of research on the target text in search of those changes or shifts from the source text that characterize a translation as creative.

Author: John W. Schwieter

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119241454

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 600

View: 235

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The Handbook of Translation and Cognition is a pioneering, state-of-the-art investigation of cognitive approaches to translation and interpreting studies (TIS). Offers timely and cutting-edge coverage of the most important theoretical frameworks and methodological innovations Contains original contributions from a global group of leading researchers from 18 countries Explores topics related to translator and workplace characteristics including machine translation, creativity, ergonomic perspectives, and cognitive effort, and competence, training, and interpreting such as multimodal processing, neurocognitive optimization, process-oriented pedagogies, and conceptual change Maps out future directions for cognition and translation studies, as well as areas in need of more research within this dynamic field
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Lexis and Creativity in Translation

The book also offers theoretical and practical guidance for researchers who wish to conduct their own corpus-based investigations of translation. No previous knowledge of German, corpus linguistics or computing is assumed.

Author: Dorothy Kenny

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317640745

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 252

View: 227

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Computers offer new perspectives in the study of language, allowing us to see phenomena that previously remained obscure because of the limitations of our vantage points. It is not uncommon for computers to be likened to the telescope, or microscope, in this respect. In this pioneering computer-assisted study of translation, Dorothy Kenny suggests another image, that of the kaleidoscope: playful changes of perspective using corpus-processing software allow textual patterns to come into focus and then recede again as others take their place. And against the background of repeated patterns in a corpus, creative uses of language gain a particular prominence. In Lexis and Creativity in Translation, Kenny monitors the translation of creative source-text word forms and collocations uncovered in a specially constructed German-English parallel corpus of literary texts. Using an abundance of examples, she reveals evidence of both normalization and ingenious creativity in translation. Her discussion of lexical creativity draws on insights from traditional morphology, structural semantics and, most notably, neo-Firthian corpus linguistics, suggesting that rumours of the demise of linguistics in translation studies are greatly exaggerated. Lexis and Creativity in Translation is essential reading for anyone interested in corpus linguistics and its impact so far on translation studies. The book also offers theoretical and practical guidance for researchers who wish to conduct their own corpus-based investigations of translation. No previous knowledge of German, corpus linguistics or computing is assumed.
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