Uncle Tom s Cabin on the American Stage and Screen

This book traces the major dramatizations of Stowe's classic from its inception in 1852 through modern versions on film. Frick introduce the reader to the artists who created the plays and productions that created theatre history.

Author: John W. Frick

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137566454

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 308

View: 529

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No play in the history of the American Stage has been as ubiquitous and as widely viewed as Uncle Tom's Cabin . This book traces the major dramatizations of Stowe's classic from its inception in 1852 through modern versions on film. Frick introduce the reader to the artists who created the plays and productions that created theatre history.
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Theatre History Studies 2014 Vol 33

Uncle Tom's Cabin” on the American Stage and Screen. By John W. Frick. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. xvii + 308 pp. $95.00 cloth.

Author: Elizabeth Reitz Mullenix

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817358075

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 862

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Theatre History Studies 2014, Volume 33, brings together an original collection of essays that explore a topic of growing interest--theatre and war.
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Women in Medicine in Nineteenth Century American Literature

John W. Frick, Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), 17. For a brief overview of the basic contrasts ...

Author: Sara L. Crosby

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319964638

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 257

View: 295

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This book investigates how popular American literature and film transformed the poisonous woman from a misogynist figure used to exclude women and minorities from political power into a feminist hero used to justify the expansion of their public roles. Sara Crosby locates the origins of this metamorphosis in Uncle Tom’s Cabin where Harriet Beecher Stowe applied an alternative medical discourse to revise the poisonous Cassy into a doctor. The newly “medicalized” poisoner then served as a focal point for two competing narratives that envisioned the American nation as a multi-racial, egalitarian democracy or as a white and male supremacist ethno-state. Crosby tracks this battle from the heroic healers created by Stowe, Mary Webb, Oscar Micheaux, and Louisia May Alcott to the even more monstrous poisoners or “vampires” imagined by E. D. E. N. Southworth, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Theda Bara, Thomas Dixon, Jr., and D. W. Griffith.
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Race and Vision in the Nineteenth Century United States

Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Harrison, Les. The Temple and the Forum: The American Museum and ...

Author: Shirley Samuels

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498573122

Category: Photography

Page: 236

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Race and Vision in the Nineteenth-Century United States is a collection of twelve essays by cultural critics that exposes how fraught relations of identity and race appear through imaging technologies in architecture, scientific discourse, sculpture, photography, painting, music, theater, and, finally, the twenty-first century visual commentary of Kara Walker. Throughout these essays, the racial practices of the nineteenth century are juxtaposed with literary practices involving some of the most prominent writers about race and identity, such as Herman Melville and Harriet Beecher Stowe, as well as the technologies of performance including theater and music. Recent work in critical theories of vision, technology, and the production of ideas about racial discourse has emphasized the inextricability of photography with notions of race and American identity. The collected essays provide a vivid sense of how imagery about race appears in the formative period of the nineteenth-century United States.
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The History of American Literature on Film

17 Frick, Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen, p. 211. 18 Frick, Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen, p. 215.

Author: Thomas Leitch

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781628923728

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 464

View: 207

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From William Dickson's Rip Van Winkle films (1896) to Baz Luhrmann's big-budget production of The Great Gatsby (2013) and beyond, cinematic adaptations of American literature participate in a rich and fascinating history. Unlike previous studies of American literature and film, which emphasize particular authors like Edith Wharton and Nathaniel Hawthorne, particular texts like Moby-Dick, particular literary periods like the American Renaissance, or particular genres like the novel, this volume considers the multiple functions of filmed American literature as a cinematic genre in its own right-one that reflects the specific political and aesthetic priorities of different national and historical cinemas even as it plays a decisive role in defining American literature for a global audience.
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Pet Projects

See, for example, Robin Bernstein, Racial Innocence: Performing American ... John W. Frick, “Uncle Tom's Cabin” on the American Stage and Screen (New York: ...

Author: Elizabeth Young

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271085098

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 910

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In Pet Projects, Elizabeth Young joins an analysis of the representation of animals in nineteenth-century fiction, taxidermy, and the visual arts with a first-person reflection on her own scholarly journey. Centering on Margaret Marshall Saunders, a Canadian woman writer once famous for her animal novels, and incorporating Young’s own experience of a beloved animal’s illness, this study highlights the personal and intellectual stakes of a “pet project” of cultural criticism. Young assembles a broad archive of materials, beginning with Saunders’s novels and widening outward to include fiction, nonfiction, photography, and taxidermy. She coins the term “first-dog voice” to describe the narrative technique of novels, such as Saunders’s Beautiful Joe, written in the first person from the perspective of an animal. She connects this voice to contemporary political issues, revealing how animal fiction such as Saunders’s reanimates nineteenth-century writing about both feminism and slavery. Highlighting the prominence of taxidermy in the late nineteenth century, she suggests that Saunders transforms taxidermic techniques in surprising ways that provide new forms of authority for women. Young adapts Freud to analyze literary representations of mourning by and for animals, and she examines how Canadian writers, including Saunders, use animals to explore race, ethnicity, and national identity. Her wide-ranging investigation incorporates twenty-first as well as nineteenth-century works of literature and culture, including recent art using taxidermy and contemporary film. Throughout, she reflects on the tools she uses to craft her analyses, examining the state of scholarly fields from feminist criticism to animal studies. With a lively, first-person voice that highlights experiences usually concealed in academic studies by scholarly discourse—such as detours, zigzags, roadblocks, and personal experience—this unique and innovative book will delight animal enthusiasts and academics in the fields of animal studies, gender studies, American studies, and Canadian studies.
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Melodramatic Silencing

Author: Claudia Vanessa Dorn

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106016506856

Category: African American women in literature

Page: 154

View: 448

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Uncle

Collier-Thomas, Bettye, and V. P. Franklin. My Soul Is a Witness: A Chronology of the ... Frick, John W. Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen.

Author: Cheryl Thompson

Publisher: Coach House Books

ISBN: 9781770566316

Category: Social Science

Page:

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From martyr to insult, how “Uncle Tom” has influenced two centuries of racial politics. Jackie Robinson, President Barack Obama, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, O.J. Simpson and Christopher Darden have all been accused of being an Uncle Tom during their careers. How, why, and with what consequences for our society did Uncle Tom morph first into a servile old man and then to a racial epithet hurled at African American men deemed, by other Black people, to have betrayed their race? Uncle Tom, the eponymous figure in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s sentimental anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, was a loyal Christian who died a martyr’s death. But soon after the best-selling novel appeared, theatre troupes across North America and Europe transformed Stowe’s story into minstrel shows featuring white men in blackface. In Uncle, Cheryl Thompson traces Tom’s journey from literary character to racial trope. She explores how Uncle Tom came to be and exposes the relentless reworking of Uncle Tom into a nostalgic, racial metaphor with the power to shape how we see Black men, a distortion visible in everything from Uncle Ben and Rastus The Cream of Wheat chef to Shirley Temple and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson to Bill Cosby. In Donald Trump’s post-truth America, where nostalgia is used as a political tool to rewrite history, Uncle makes the case for why understanding the production of racial stereotypes matters more than ever before.
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American Cinderellas on the Broadway Musical Stage

Beyond the Golden Door: JewishAmerican Drama and JewishAmerican ... by Heather DavisFisch Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen by John W.

Author: Maya Cantu

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137534606

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 790

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Drawing upon Broadway musicals ranging from Irene (1919) to Gypsy (1959), American Cinderellas on the Broadway Musical Stage considers how Broadway musicals from the 1920s through the 1950s adapted and transformed Perrault's fairy tale icon in order to address changing social and professional roles for American women. Drawing heavily upon historical research in American culture and gender studies, Cantu analyzes female lyricists and librettists who were significant in translating Perrault's heroine to the contexts and concerns of the American "working girl." In exploring how these and other writers (of both sexes) adapted the Cinderella myth to a twentieth-century urban landscape, this book challenges traditional assumptions about the American musical's relationship to both feminism and modernism - placing the Cinderella story into the Broadway musical canon.
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W C Fields from Burlesque and Vaudeville to Broadway

Mendel's Theatre: Heredity, Eugenics, and Early TwentiethCentury American ... by Heather DavisFisch Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen by ...

Author: Arthur Frank Wertheim

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137300683

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 292

View: 955

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A virtuoso comedian, W. C. Fields is often called a comic genius and legendary iconoclast who gave the gift of laughter to multitudes during his epoch and left a legacy of humor for future generations. Using the newly opened W. C. Fields Papers at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Library, this groundbreaking book explores how he became a comedian during his lesser known stage career from 1898 to 1930 - years of hardship and exaltation that had a major influence on his comedy and characterizations in his films. The volume also uncovers new knowledge about Fields's traumatic private life and complex personality, revealing an aggrieved artist whose emotional anguish found refuge in his poignant comedy about life's frustrations and the human condition.
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The Soul of Pleasure

... Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Battle for America (New York: W. W. Norton, 2010), 178; John W. Frick, Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen (New ...

Author: David Monod

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501703980

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 694

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Show business is today so essential to American culture it’s hard to imagine a time when it was marginal. But as David Monod demonstrates, the appetite for amusements outside the home was not "natural": it developed slowly over the course of the nineteenth century. The Soul of Pleasure offers a new interpretation of how the taste for entertainment was cultivated. Monod focuses on the shifting connection between the people who built successful popular entertainments and the public who consumed them. Show people discovered that they had to adapt entertainment to the moral outlook of Americans, which they did by appealing to sentiment. The Soul of Pleasure explores several controversial forms of popular culture—minstrel acts, burlesques, and saloon variety shows—and places them in the context of changing values and perceptions. Far from challenging respectability, Monod argues that entertainments reflected and transformed the audience’s ideals. In the mid-nineteenth century, sentimentality not only infused performance styles and the content of shows but also altered the expectations of the theatergoing public. Sentimental entertainment depended on sensational effects that produced surprise, horror, and even gales of laughter. After the Civil War the sensational charge became more important than the sentimental bond, and new forms of entertainment gained in popularity and provided the foundations for vaudeville, America’s first mass entertainment. Ultimately, it was American entertainment’s variety that would provide the true soul of pleasure.
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Performance Reconstruction and Spanish Golden Age Drama

... Performance: The Ghosts of the Franklin Expedition by Heather Davis-Fisch Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen by John W. Frick Theatre, ...

Author: L. Vidler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137437075

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 187

View: 201

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Spanish Golden Age drama has resurfaced in recent years, however scholarly analysis has not kept pace with its popularity. This book problematizes and analyzes the approaches to staging reconstruction taken over the past few decades, including historical, semiotic, anthropological, cultural, structural, cognitive and phenomenological methods.
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African American Entertainers in Australia and New Zealand

John W. Frick, Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen, 121; Easton's Uncle Tom role was advertised in the Argus as opening on June 8, 1878.

Author: Bill Egan

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476637433

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 554

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Eleven African Americans, including a musician, were among the First Fleet of colonial settlers to Australia. In the 150-plus following years, African Americans visiting the region included jubilee singers, vaudevillians, sports stars and general entertainers. This book provides the only comprehensive history of more than 350 African American entertainers in Australia and New Zealand between European settlement in Australia in 1788 and the entry of the United States into World War II in 1941. Famous names covered include boxer Jack Johnson, film star Nina Mae McKinney and jazz singer Eva Taylor. Background stories provide a multidimensional view of the entertainers’ time in a place very far from home.
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Performing Adaptations

Ohio Stage University Theatre Collection Bulletin 15 (1968): 38-39; and John H. McDowell, ... Slout, William L. “Uncle Tom's Cabin in American Film History.

Author: Michelle MacArthur

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443809351

Category: Art

Page: 285

View: 839

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Performing Adaptations: Conversations and Essays on the Theory and Practice of Adaptation brings together scholars and artists from across North America and the United Kingdom to contribute to the growing discourse on adaptation in the arts. An ideal text for students of theatre, drama, and performance studies, this volume offers a ground-breaking set of essays, interviews, and artistic reflections that assess adaptation from the perspective of live performance, an aspect of the field that has been under-explored until now. The diverse authors and interview subjects in this anthology take a variety of approaches to both creating and analyzing adaptations, demonstrating the form’s suitability for testing and speaking back to dominant models of creation, production, and analysis. Featuring articles by pioneering adaptation scholar Linda Hutcheon and critically acclaimed writer and critic George Elliott Clarke, Performing Adaptations advances the field of adaptation studies in new and exciting ways. The authors in Performing Adaptations do not comprise a comprehensive view of adaptation studies, but represent a collection of “gutsy” voices that use adaptation to test, and speak back to dominant models of creation, production, and analysis. Some of these perspectives include a group of artists from the African Diaspora, Europe, and Canada (the AfriCan Theatre Ensemble); the voice of Chinese-Canadian playwright, Marjorie Chan; the innovative storytelling of Beth Watkins, and her adaptation of letters written by transgendered student activist, Jesse Carr; the views of vanguard Canadian queer filmmaker, John Greyson; and African-Canadian poet, novelist, and critic, George Elliott Clarke. Their adaptation of sources to other genres, mediums, and cultural contexts represent the act of a radical, dialogical reading, writ large.
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Audrey Wood and the Playwrights

Staging the People: Community and Identity in the Federal Theatre Project by ... by Heather DavisFisch Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen by ...

Author: M. Barranger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137270603

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 220

View: 602

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From Tennessee Williams and Carson McCullers to Arthur Kopit and Brian Friel, agent Audrey Wood encouraged and guided the unique talents of playwrights in the Broadway theatre of her day. Her quiet determination and burning enthusiasm brought America's finest mid-century playwrights to prominence and altered stage history.
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Theatre to Cinema

This study of the origins of film looks at the relations between early cinema and 19th century theatre, examining how film-makers in Europe and America assimilated and adapted 19th century theatrical and acting styles.

Author: Assistant Director Center for Film and Theater Research Ben Brewster

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198182678

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 244

View: 962

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This study of the origins of film looks at the relations between early cinema and 19th century theatre, examining how film-makers in Europe and America assimilated and adapted 19th century theatrical and acting styles.
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Peering Behind the Curtain

By considering a recent example of Uncle Tom's appearance on the American ... of literature to the stage, screen, and finally onto the streets of America.

Author: Kimball King

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135309039

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 194

View: 757

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First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Shaping the Future of African American Film

Although film scholar Thomas Cripps describes Edison's films leading up to this ... Loosely based on the life of Josiah Henson, Uncle Tom's Cabin is about a ...

Author: Monica White Ndounou

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813562575

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 331

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In Hollywood, we hear, it’s all about the money. It’s a ready explanation for why so few black films get made—no crossover appeal, no promise of a big payoff. But what if the money itself is color-coded? What if the economics that governs film production is so skewed that no film by, about, or for people of color will ever look like a worthy investment unless it follows specific racial or gender patterns? This, Monica Ndounou shows us, is precisely the case. In a work as revealing about the culture of filmmaking as it is about the distorted economics of African American film, Ndounou clearly traces the insidious connections between history, content, and cash in black films. How does history come into it? Hollywood’s reliance on past performance as a measure of potential success virtually guarantees that historically underrepresented, underfunded, and undersold African American films devalue the future prospects of black films. So the cycle continues as it has for nearly a century. Behind the scenes, the numbers are far from neutral. Analyzing the onscreen narratives and off-screen circumstances behind nearly two thousand films featuring African Americans in leading and supporting roles, including such recent productions as Bamboozled, Beloved, and Tyler Perry’s Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Ndounou exposes the cultural and racial constraints that limit not just the production but also the expression and creative freedom of black films. Her wide-ranging analysis reaches into questions of literature, language, speech and dialect, film images and narrative, acting, theater and film business practices, production history and financing, and organizational history. By uncovering the ideology behind profit-driven industry practices that reshape narratives by, about, and for people of color, this provocative work brings to light existing limitations—and possibilities for reworking stories and business practices in theater, literature, and film.
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Charles Dickens s Great Expectations

... Uncle Tom's Cabin on the American Stage and Screen (Basingstoke, 2012). 98 'Reviews and Literary Notices: Great Expectations', Atlantic Monthly, ...

Author: Mary Hammond

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317168249

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 112

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Great Expectations has had a long, active and sometimes surprising life since its first serialized appearance in All the Year Round between 1 December 1860 and 3 August 1861. In this new publishing and reception history, Mary Hammond demonstrates that while Dickens’s thirteenth novel can tell us a great deal about the dynamic mid-Victorian moment into which it was born, its afterlife beyond the nineteenth-century Anglophone world reveals the full extent of its versatility. Re-assessing generations of Dickens scholarship and using newly discovered archival material, Hammond covers the formative history of Great Expectations' early years, analyses the extent and significance of its global reach, and explores the ways in which it has functioned as literature and stage, TV, film and radio drama from its first appearance to the latest film version of 2012. Appendices include contemporary reviews and comprehensive bibliographies of adaptations and translations. The book is a rich resource for scholars and students of Dickens; of comparative literature; and of publishing, readership, and media history.
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Profiles of African American Stage Performers and Theatre People 1816 1960

Dramatic and character actor of stage , screen , and radio ; also a ... and with an Uncle Tom's Cabin show ( 1898 ) , in which he sang “ Old Black Joe .

Author: Bernard L. Peterson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313295344

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 503

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Entries provide succinct biographical and theatrical information gathered from a variety of sources including library theater and drama collections, dissertations and theses, newspaper and magazine reviews and criticism, theater programs, theatrical memoirs, and earlier performing arts directories. Among the professional artists included in this volume are performers, librettists, lyricists, directors, producers, choreographers, stage managers, and musicians. The individuals profiled represent almost every major category and genre of the professional, semiprofessional, regional, and academic stage including minstrelsy, vaudeville, musical theater, and drama.
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