Wetlands of the American Midwest

In this readable and objective account, Hugh Prince examines literary evidence as well as government and scientific documents to uncover the history of changing attitudes toward wetlands in the American Midwest.

Author: Hugh Prince

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226682838

Category: Science

Page: 412

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How people perceive wetlands has always played a crucial role in determining how people act toward them. In this readable and objective account, Hugh Prince examines literary evidence as well as government and scientific documents to uncover the history of changing attitudes toward wetlands in the American Midwest. As attitudes changed, so did scientific research agendas, government policies, and farmers' strategies for managing their land. Originally viewed as bountiful sources of wildlife by indigenous peoples, wet areas called "wet prairies," "swamps," or "bogs" in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were considered productive only when drained for agricultural use. Beginning in the 1950s, many came to see these renamed "wetlands" as valuable for wildlife and soil conservation. Prince's book will appeal to a wide readership, ranging from geographers and environmental historians to the many government and private agencies and individuals concerned with wetland research, management, and preservation.
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Wetlands of the American Midwest

Swarms of insects are the most profuse and characteristic forms of life in all Midwestern wetlands. ... The Mississippi flyway is followed by over 30% of North America's migratory birds on their way from the Canadian tundra to wintering ...

Author: Hugh Prince

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226682808

Category: Science

Page: 410

View: 356

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How people perceive wetlands has always played a crucial role in determining how people act toward them. In this readable and objective account, Hugh Prince examines literary evidence as well as government and scientific documents to uncover the history of changing attitudes toward wetlands in the American Midwest. As attitudes changed, so did scientific research agendas, government policies, and farmers' strategies for managing their land. Originally viewed as bountiful sources of wildlife by indigenous peoples, wet areas called "wet prairies," "swamps," or "bogs" in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were considered productive only when drained for agricultural use. Beginning in the 1950s, many came to see these renamed "wetlands" as valuable for wildlife and soil conservation. Prince's book will appeal to a wide readership, ranging from geographers and environmental historians to the many government and private agencies and individuals concerned with wetland research, management, and preservation.
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The Rural Midwest Since World War II

Ann Vileisis, Discovering the Unknown Landscape: A History of America's Wetlands ... Hugh Prince, Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes, University of Chicago Geography Research Paper No.

Author: Rodney Anderson

Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press

ISBN: 9781501751318

Category: History

Page: 335

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J.L. Anderson seeks to change the belief that the Midwest lacks the kind of geographic coherence, historical issues, and cultural touchstones that have informed regional identity in the American South, West, and Northeast. The goal of this illuminating volume is to demonstrate uniqueness in a region that has always been amorphous and is increasingly so. Midwesterners are a dynamic people who shaped the physical and social landscapes of the great midsection of the nation, and they are presented as such in this volume that offers a general yet informed overview of the region after World War II. The contributors--most of whom are Midwesterners by birth or residence--seek to better understand a particular piece of rural America, a place too often caricatured, misunderstood, and ignored. However, the rural landscape has experienced agricultural diversity and major shifts in land use. Farmers in the region have successfully raised new commodities from dairy and cherries to mint and sugar beets. The region has also been a place where community leaders fought to improve their economic and social well-being, women redefined their roles on the farm, and minorities asserted their own version of the American Dream. The rural Midwest is a regional melting pot, and contributors to this volume do not set out to sing its praises or, by contrast, assume the position of Midwestern modesty and self-deprecation. The essays herein rewrite the narrative of rural decline and crisis, and show through solid research and impeccable scholarship that rural Midwesterners have confronted and created challenges uniquely their own.
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Geographers

Earle, C. (1999), 'Wetlands of the American Midwest', Journal of Economic History 59,251–2. English, P. W. and Mayfield, R. C. (1972), Man, Space and Environment: Essays in Contemporary Human Geography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Author: Hayden Lorimer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474251389

Category: History

Page: 256

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Volume 34 of Geographers: Biobibliographical Studies features eight essays that together demonstrate geographers' diverse scholarly engagement with the practise of their subject. There are two physical geographers (a Frenchman and an Englishman, both geomorphologists), a British historical geographer, a French colonial geographer, a Russian explorer-naturalist of Central Asia and Tibet, a British-born but long-time Australian resident and scholar of India, Pakistan, and the Pacific world, an American regionalist and eugenicist, and a Scots-born long-time American resident, one of the world's leading Marxist geographers and urban theorists. Equally but differently committed to geography's many specialisms, these subjects wonderfully illuminate the vibrancy – and the contradictions – behind the living of geographical lives.
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America s Natural Places The Midwest

“Landowner's Guide: Swamps.” http://www. michigandnr.com/publications/pdfs/huntingwildlifehabitat/Landowners_Guide/ Habitat_Mgmt/Wetland/Swamps.htm. Prince, Hugh. “Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing ...

Author: Jason Ney

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313353174

Category: Nature

Page: 202

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From Iowa's Decorah Ice Cave to the Kitty Todd Nature Preserve in Ohio, this volume provides a snapshot of the most spectacular and important natural places in the Midwestern United States. • Illustrations depict 50 of the most treasured landscapes in the Midwest
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America s Wetlands

Wetlands can be found all over North America. This book covers the wetlands of six regions north of Mexico: Southeast, Northeast, Midwest, West, Pacific, and North. (Note: Although ponds, lakes, rivers, and streams are not considered ...

Author: Marianne D. Wallace

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN: 9781555914844

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

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Looks at what wetlands are and the plants and animals found there; and describes wetlands characteristic of different regions of the United States and Canada.
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Wetlands

People of the Wetlands: Bogs, Bodies, and Lake Dwellers. London: Guild Publishing, 1989. ... Prehistoric Native Americans and Ecological Change. ... Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes.

Author: Peter D. Moore

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438100692

Category: Science

Page: 241

View: 713

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Provides coverage of wetlands - including information on the global cycling of water, and on the relationship between the water cycle, rock weathering, and wetland formation. This book examines the diversity of wetlands in the past, present, and future, how they work, and how they can be conserved.
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The World s Largest Wetlands

A spatial simulation model of hydrology and vegetation dynamics in semi-permanent prairie wetlands. Ecological Applications, 3, 279--93. Prince, H. (1997). Wetlands of the American Midwest: a Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes.

Author: Lauchlan H. Fraser

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139443951

Category: Nature

Page:

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During the past century approximately fifty percent of the world's wetlands have been destroyed, largely due to human activities. Increased human population has lead to shrinkage of wetland areas, and data show that as they shrink, their important functions decline. Reduced wetland area causes more flooding in Spring, less available water during drought, greater risk of water pollution, and less food production and reduced carbon storage. Much of the remaining pristine wetland systems are found in the world's largest wetlands, and yet these areas have received surprisingly little scientific research or attention. This volume presents the views of leading experts on each of the world's largest wetland systems. Here, this international team of authors share their understanding of the ecological dynamics of large wetlands and their significance, and emphasise their need of conservation.
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Environmental History and the American South

Ann Vileisis, Discovering the Unknown Landscape: A History of America's Wetlands (Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1997); Hugh Prince, Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes (Chicago, ...

Author: Paul Sutter

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820332802

Category: History

Page: 488

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This reader gathers fifteen of the most important essays written in the field of southern environmental history over the past decade. Ideal for course use, the volume provides a convenient entrée into the recent literature on the region as it indicates the variety of directions in which the field is growing. As coeditor Paul S. Sutter writes in his introduction, “recent trends in environmental historiography--a renewed emphasis on agricultural landscapes and their hybridity, attention to the social and racial histories of environmental thought and practice, and connections between health and the environment among them--have made the South newly attractive terrain. This volume suggests, then, that southern environmental history has not only arrived but also that it may prove an important space for the growth of the larger environmental history enterprise.” The writings, which range in setting from the Texas plains to the Carolina Lowcountry, address a multiplicity of topics, such as husbandry practices in the Chesapeake colonies and the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. The contributors’ varied disciplinary perspectives--including agricultural history, geography, the history of science, the history of technology, military history, colonial American history, urban and regional planning history, and ethnohistory--also point to the field’s vitality. Conveying the breadth, diversity, and liveliness of this maturing area of study, Environmental History and the American South affirms the critical importance of human-environmental interactions to the history and culture of the region. Contributors: Virginia DeJohn Anderson William Boyd Lisa Brady Joshua Blu Buhs Judith Carney James Taylor Carson Craig E. Colten S. Max Edelson Jack Temple Kirby Ralph H. Lutts Eileen Maura McGurty Ted Steinberg Mart Stewart Claire Strom Paul Sutter Harry Watson Albert G. Way
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An International Perspective on Wetland Rehabilitation

Wetlands of the American Midwest. University of Chicago Press, Ltd. London, UK. Probert, R.J. and P.L. Longley. 1989. Recalcitrant seed storage physiology in three aquatic grasses (Zizania palustris, Spartina angelica, and Porteresia ...

Author: W.J. Streever

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401146838

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 338

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Bill Streever, author of Bringing Back the Wetlands and numerous technical articles about wetland restoration and creation, worked for two years to bring together this collection of papers. Authors ranging from private landowners to government managers to scientists present regional overviews, case studies, and discussions of various issues. Regional overviews cover areas as small as the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands to areas as large as Australia and Africa. Case studies range from relatively small projects, such as rehabilitation of damage caused by wheel ruts in the high arctic, to much larger projects, such as attempts to rehabilitate thousands of hectares of Northern Territory wetlands in Australia. Seedbank ecology, economics, remote sensing, community involvement, the role of the wetland consulting industry, and other issues are discussed. In an effort to synthesize information from around the world, Joy Zedler presents a model that allows comparison of projects and may lead to better predictability of project outcomes. In An International Perspective on Wetland Rehabilitation, authors describe planting, engineered structures, prescribed flooding, excavation, and other rehabilitation methods, from Israel to New Zealand to the Netherlands and elsewhere. For the first time, one volume offers an impression of the magnitude and diversity of the field of wetland rehabilitation around the globe.
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Wetlands and Quiet Waters of the Midwest

The American Midwest is no exception . For example , an estimated 5.6 million of Indiana's 23 million acres were originally wetlands — upland swamp forest , floodplains , wet prairies , marshes , fens , and bogs .

Author: Robert O. and Anne Petty

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253217660

Category: Nature

Page: 99

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This beautifullly photographed, compact field guide pays homage to sweet-flags, ragged-fringed orchids, swamp thistles, and more.
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Wetlands

The ability of wetlands to serve as sinks for nitrogen is now being widely investigated as a solution to this pollution problem in the American Midwest (see e.g., Mitsch et al., 2001; Mitsch and Day, 2006). The anaerobic process of ...

Author: William J. Mitsch

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118174487

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 600

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Wetlands in a Dry Land

... 2010); Hugh Prince, Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008); Ann Vileisis, Discovering the Unknown Landscape: A History of America's Wetlands ...

Author: Emily O'Gorman

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295749044

Category: Nature

Page: 296

View: 644

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In the name of agriculture, urban growth, and disease control, humans have drained, filled, or otherwise destroyed nearly 87 percent of the world’s wetlands over the past three centuries. Unintended consequences include biodiversity loss, poor water quality, and the erosion of cultural sites, and only in the past few decades have wetlands been widely recognized as worth preserving. Emily O’Gorman asks, What has counted as a wetland, for whom, and with what consequences? Using the Murray-Darling Basin—a massive river system in eastern Australia that includes over 30,000 wetland areas—as a case study and drawing on archival research and original interviews, O’Gorman examines how people and animals have shaped wetlands from the late nineteenth century to today. She illuminates deeper dynamics by relating how Aboriginal peoples acted then and now as custodians of the landscape, despite the policies of the Australian government; how the movements of water birds affected farmers; and how mosquitoes have defied efforts to fully understand, let alone control, them. Situating the region’s history within global environmental humanities conversations, O’Gorman argues that we need to understand wetlands as socioecological landscapes in order to create new kinds of relationships with and futures for these places.
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Governing the Environment in the Early Modern World

8 For the quantity of American wetlands during the early republic, see Thomas E. Dahl, Wetlands Losses in the United ... Wetlands and the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes (Chicago: Chicago University Press, ...

Author: Sara Miglietti

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317200291

Category: History

Page: 210

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Throughout the early modern period, scientific debate and governmental action became increasingly preoccupied with the environment, generating discussion across Europe and the wider world as to how to improve land and climate for human benefit. This discourse eventually promoted the reconsideration of long-held beliefs about the role of climate in upholding the social order, driving economies and affecting public health. Governing the Environment in the Early Modern World explores the relationship between cultural perceptions of the environment and practical attempts at environmental regulation and change between 1500 and 1800. Taking a cultural and intellectual approach to early modern environmental governance, this edited collection combines an interpretative perspective with new insights into a period largely unfamiliar to environmental historians. Using a rich and multifaceted narrative, this book offers an understanding as to how efforts to enhance productive aspects of the environment were both led by and contributed to new conceptualisations of the role of ‘nature’ in human society. This book offers a cultural and intellectual approach to early modern environmental history and will be of special interest to environmental, cultural and intellectual historians, as well as anyone with an interest in the culture and politics of environmental governance.
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Compensating for Wetland Losses Under the Clean Water Act

Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Race, M.S. 1985. Critique of present wetlands mitigation policies in the United States based on an analysis of ...

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309133025

Category: Political Science

Page: 348

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Recognizing the importance of wetland protection, the Bush administration in 1988 endorsed the goal of “no net loss†of wetlands. Specifically, it directed that filling of wetlands should be avoided, and minimized when it cannot be avoided. When filling is permitted, compensatory mitigation must be undertaken; that is, wetlands must be restored, created, enhanced, and, in exceptional cases, preserved, to replace the permitted loss of wetland area and function, such as water quality improvement within the watershed. After more than a dozen years, the national commitment to “no net loss†of wetlands has been evaluated. This new book explores the adequacy of science and technology for replacing wetland function and the effectiveness of the federal program of compensatory mitigation in accomplishing the nation’s goal of clean water. It examines the regulatory framework for permitting wetland filling and requiring mitigation, compares the mitigation institutions that are in use, and addresses the problems that agencies face in ensuring sustainability of mitigated wetlands over the long term. Gleaning lessons from the mixed results of mitigation efforts to date, the book offers 10 practical guidelines for establishing and monitoring mitigated wetlands. It also recommends that federal, state, and local agencies undertake specific institutional reforms. This book will be important to anyone seeking a comprehensive understanding of the “no net loss†issue: policy makers, regulators, environmental scientists, educators, and wetland advocates.
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Wetland Environments

For example the draining of wetlands in the American Midwest through agricultural drainage tiles resulted in degraded wetland habitats and changes to waterflow regimes, rendering these areas unsuitable for native wetland biota.

Author: James S. Aber

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118349533

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 258

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Wetlands - swamp, marsh, bayou, tundra and bog - are places thatare rarely visited and often misunderstood but they have, in fact,conspicuous roles in the physical, biological and culturalgeography of the world. They are intrinsically beautifulenvironments where one may see the natural and essential values inthe interaction of water, soil, vegetation, wildlife, andhumans. Wetlands occur at the confluence of uniqueterrestrial, hydrological and climatic conditions that give rise tosome of the most biodiverse regions of the world. They alsoplay vital roles in the cycling and storage of key nutrients,materials and energy through the Earth?s system. A complete study of wetland environments requires the assessmentof their physical and biological attributes, properties andfunctions of these ecosystems, and the economic, political andsocial aspects that mediate their use globally. A systemsapproach is taken throughout this book which emphasizes theinteractions between these elements of wetland ecosystems. Moreover, selected case studies from across the world are used toillustrate wetland characteristics and circumstances. This book is intended to foster a greater awareness andappreciation of wetlands, promote a culture of conservation andwise management, and spread the knowledge that wetlands areimportant, indeed crucial, elements of the globalenvironment. Our attempts to understand, manage and enhancewetlands in the twenty-first century are part of the larger effortto maintain a sustainable Earth. Readership: Introductory or intermediate levelundergraduates taking courses on wetland environments Additional resources for this book can be found at: ahref="http://www.wiley.com/go/aber/wetland"www.wiley.com/go/aber/wetland/a.
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Cultural Encounters with the Environment

In Ecology of Wetlands and Associated Systems , ed . S. K. Majumdar , E. W. Miller , and F. J. ... National Wetlands Newsletter 19 ( 5 ) : 5-6 . 1998. ... Wetlands of the American Midwest : A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes .

Author: Viola Haarmann

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 074250106X

Category: Science

Page: 337

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In Cultural Encounters with the Environment, a distinguished group of contributors offers a fresh and original view of contemporary geography. The authors explore the role of four traditional themes in the Onew cultural geographyO: the interplay between the evolution of particular biophysical niches and the activities of the culture groups that inhabit them; the diffusion of cultural traits; the establishment and definition of culture areas; and the distinctive mix of geographical characteristics that gives places their special character in relation to one another. By examining how cultural space is constructed; how environment is remade, understood, and imaged as a consequence; and how people lay claim to place, this volume establishes a compelling case for the importance of these enduring concepts to present and future trajectories in cultural geography.
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Creating and Restoring Wetlands

Today, government programs such as the Wetlands Reserve and Conservation Reserve Programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture offer financial incentives to restore wetlands. In the Glaciated Interior Plains of the American Midwest, ...

Author: Christopher Craft

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780124076594

Category: Science

Page: 358

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Creating and Restoring Wetlands: From Theory to Practice describes the challenges and opportunities relating to the restoration of freshwater and estuarine wetlands in natural, agricultural, and urban environments in the coming century. The underpinnings of restoration, driven by ecological (disturbance, dispersal, succession) theory, are described and applied to various activities (restoring hydrology, soils, and biota) that are used to improve the short- and long-term success of wetland restoration projects. Unforeseen problems that hinder restoration efforts and solutions to these problems are discussed in this comprehensive book that contains five sections and 13 chapters that include an introduction describing the defining characteristics of wetland – hydrology, soils, biota, the role of theory in guiding wetland succession, ecosystem development following restoration, and differentiating wetland reclamation, restoration, and creation, restoration of various estuarine and freshwater wetlands, case studies of estuarine and freshwater restoration and large-scale restoration, and finally, the future of wetland restoration. Explicitly links ecological theory to restoration efforts in a variety of freshwater and estuarine, natural, agricultural, urban landscapes, and wetland ecosystems Contains case studies of small- and large-scale restoration activities ensuring relevance to individuals and organizations Illustrates successes as well as failures of freshwater and estuarine wetland restorations in order to learn from them Presents specific information on hydrology, biota, wetland succession, ecosystem development following restoration, and more
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America s Natural Places 5 volumes

Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes.” University of Chicago Research Papers, January 1998. U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center. “Regional Landscape Ecosystems of ...

Author: Stacy S. Kowtko

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313350894

Category: Nature

Page: 908

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This timely set invites readers to celebrate the most beautiful and environmentally important places in the United States. • Covers one region per volume with entries organized by state within the volume • 200 illustrations depict America's most treasured landscapes
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North American Odyssey

Wetlands of the American Midwest: A Historical Geography of Changing Attitudes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Reisner, Marc. 1986. Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. New York: Penguin. Reuss, Martin.

Author: Craig E. Colten

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442215863

Category: Social Science

Page: 460

View: 182

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This groundbreaking volume offers a fresh approach to conceptualizing the historical geography of North America by taking a thematic rather than a traditional regional perspective. Leading geographers, building on current scholarship in the field, explore five central themes. Part I explores the settling and resettling of the continent through the experiences of Native Americans, early European arrivals, and Africans. Part II examines nineteenth-century European immigrants, the reconfiguration of Native society, and the internal migration of African Americans. Part III considers human transformations of the natural landscape in carving out a transportation network, replumbing waterways, extracting timber and minerals, preserving wilderness, and protecting wildlife. Part IV focuses on human landscapes, blending discussions of the visible imprint of society and distinctive approaches to interpreting these features. The authors discuss survey systems, regional landscapes, and tourist and mythic landscapes as well as the role of race, gender, and photographic representation in shaping our understanding of past landscapes. Part V follows the urban impulse in an analysis of the development of the mercantile city, nineteenth- and twentieth-century planning, and environmental justice. With its focus on human-environment interactions, the mobility of people, and growing urbanization, this thoughtful text will give students a uniquely geographical way to understand North American history. Contributions by: Derek H. Alderman, Timothy G. Anderson, Kevin Blake, Christopher G. Boone, Geoffrey L. Buckley, Craig E. Colten, Michael P. Conzen, Lary M. Dilsaver, Mona Domosh, William E. Doolittle, Joshua Inwood, Ines M. Miyares, E. Arnold Modlin, Jr., Edward K. Muller, Michael D. Myers, Karl Raitz, Jasper Rubin, Joan M. Schwartz, Steven Silvern, Andrew Sluyter, Jeffrey S. Smith, Robert Wilson, William Wyckoff, and Yolonda Youngs
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