Why Texans Fought in the Civil War


Author: Charles David Grear
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603448098
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5789
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In Why Texans Fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources—including thousands of letters and unpublished journals—he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants’ own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties.

The Fate of Texas

The Civil War and the Lone Star State
Author: Charles D. Grear
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1557288836
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 7065
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In its examination of a state too often neglected by Civil War historians, The Fate of Texas presents Texas as a decidedly Southern, yet in many ways unusual, state seriously committed to and deeply affected by the Confederate war effort in a multitude of ways. When the state joined the Confederacy and fought in the war, its fate was uncertain. The war touched every portion of the population and all aspects of life in Texas. Never before has a group of historians examined the impact of the war on so many facets of the state.

Civil War Texas


Author: Ralph A. Wooster
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1625110170
Category: History
Page: 88
View: 4148
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Written by one of the deans of Texas history, Civil War Texas provides an authoritative, comprehensive description of Texas during the Civil War as well as a guide for those who wish to visit sites in Texas associated with the war. In one compact volume, the reader or tourist is led on an exciting historical journey through Civil War Texas. Because most of the great battles of the Civil War were fought east of the Mississippi River, it is often forgotten that Texas made major contributions to the war effort in terms of men and supplies. Over 70,000 Texans served in the Confederate army during the war and fought in almost every major battle. Ordnance works, shops, and depots were established for the manufacture and repair of weapons of war, and Texas cotton shipped through Mexico was exchanged for weapons and ammunition. The state itself was the target of the Union army and navy. Galveston, the principal seaport, was occupied by Federal forces for three months and blockaded by the Union navy for four years. Brownsville, Port Lavaca, and Indianola were captured, and Sabine Pass, Corpus Christi, and Laredo were all under enemy attack. A major Federal attempt to invade East Texas by way of Louisiana was stopped only a few miles from the Texas border. The Civil War had significant impact upon life within the state. The naval blockade created shortages requiring Texans to find substitutes for various commodities such as coffee, salt, ink, pins, and needles. The war affected Texas women, many of whom were now required to operate farms and plantations in the absence of their soldier husbands. As the author points out in the narrative, not all Texans supported the Confederacy. Many Texans, especially in the Hill Country and North Texas, opposed secession and attempted either to remain neutral or work for a Union victory. Over two thousand Texans, led by future governor Edmund J. Davis, joined the Union army. In this carefully researched work, Ralph A. Wooster describes Texas's role in the war. He also notes the location of historical markers, statues, monuments, battle sites, buildings, and museums in Texas which may be visited by those interested in learning more about the war. Photographs, maps, chronology, end notes, and bibliography provide additional information on Civil War Texas.

Civil War in Texas and the Southwest


Author: Col USA Roy Sullivan
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 9781467829489
Category: History
Page: 220
View: 3645
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How Did Texas Survive The Civil War? More specifically, how did Texas manage to repulse invading Union armies? And why were there no major battles like Antietam, Shiloh or Gettysburg fought in Texas? Answers include that Texas was too far, too large and that Texans (over 80,000 fought in that terrible struggle) were too feisty. The Civil War in Texas and the Southwest answers the above while shedding new light on Texan audacity, bravery and just plain luck. Part one of the book provides a chronology of the tragically unsuccessful 1861-1862 invading expedition of Confederate General Sibleys Texas volunteers into New Mexico and Arizona. Sibley grandiously called his brigade the Confederate Army of New Mexico. Of the 3,700 Texans who left San Antonio on this campaign, only 2,000 stumbled back the next year. Part two contains little-known stories about failed Union efforts to conquer southern and eastern Texas between 1863-1865. For example, Galveston was occupied by Union forces in 1862, then recaptured during a six hour battle on New Years Day 1863. Further up the Texas coast at Sabine Pass, a Union flotilla of four warships, twenty-two troop transports loaded with 5,000 invasion troops was defeated by a young red-headed Irish Texan lieutenant and his 40 immigrant cannoneers from Eire. And who knows that 300 Texans repulsed 500 better-armed and provisioned Union troops at Palmito ranch in the southern tip of Texas? Palmito was the last battle of the war and was actually fought after Lees surrender. Author Sullivans previous, acclaimed book, Scattered Graves: The Civil War Campaigns of Confederate General and Cherokee Chief Stand Waitie, depicts Waties leadership and hit-and-run tactics. He was the only Indian to be promoted to general on either side and was also the last Confederate general to surrender. Both books are available through Authorhouse.

Texas In The Confederacy


Author: Colonel Harry McCorry Henderson
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1786254816
Category: History
Page: 127
View: 8493
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“An accurate and absorbing account of all the Civil War campaigns in which any Texas organizations participated - such famous units as Hood’s Texas Brigade, Walker’s Division, Terry’s Texas Rangers and Sibley’s Arizona Brigades, as well as many little-known ones. Texas troops fought in every theater of the Civil War outside the state, and at home had problems to contend with that most of the other states didn’t have; a long coastline and a long frontier had to be guarded, one from the federals and the other from the Indians. The most brilliant operation fought, says Colonel Henderson, was the battle of Sabine Pass, September 8, 1863. The young lieutenant Dick Dowling and a company of 44 Irish guards successfully defended against an invasion attempt at the mouth of the Sabine River by a force of 5000 union soldiers. A full account of this engagement in the terms of a professional soldier is given under the “1st Heavy Artillery Regiment” chapter. One of the most daring plans of the South, aimed at seizing the entire Southwest to the California coast, was the invasion of New Mexico by a brigade of Texans under Harry Hopkins Sibley. The little-known story of this brigade and the battles it fought in the arid territory along the Rio Grande in New Mexico are told in the intensely human chapter on “Sibley’s Arizona Brigade”. TEXAS IN THE CONFEDERACY is doubly valuable for bringing together all the organizations into one handy book, and for creating through this compilation a stirring story of patriotism, bravery, humor and action that will be a source of pride for every Texan and of exciting reading for all.”-Print ed.

Texas, the Dark Corner of the Confederacy

Contemporary Accounts of the Lone Star State in the Civil War
Author: B. P. Gallaway
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803270367
Category: History
Page: 286
View: 1071
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Collection of forty documents dating from the eve of the Civil War to the collaspe of the Confederacy chronicling the Civil War in Texas.

The History of Texas


Author: N.A
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118617878
Category: History
Page: 536
View: 4694
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The History of Texas is fully revised and updated in this fifth edition to reflect the latest scholarship in its coverage of Texas history from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Fully revised to reflect the most recent scholarly findings Offers extensive coverage of twentieth-century Texas history Includes an overview of Texas history up to the Election of 2012 Provides online resources for students and instructors, including a test bank, maps, presentation slides, and more

Vaqueros in blue and gray


Author: Jerry D. Thompson
Publisher: State House Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 244
View: 8337
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It is estimated that 9,500 Mexican-Americans fought in the American Civil War. The conflict in Texas deeply divided the Mexican-Texans. An estimated 2,550 fought in the ranks of the Confederacy while 950, including some Mexican nationals, fought for the Stars and Stripes. Originally published in 1976, Vaqueros in Blue & Gray is the story of these Mexican-Texans, or Tejanos as they preferred to call themselves, who participated in the Civil War. This new edition contains the first comprehensive list, containing almost 4,000 names, ever compiled on the Confederate and Union Hispanics from Texas who served in the war. Vaqueros in Blue & Gray includes the story of the Mexican-Texans who fought in the Union Army and saw action in Louisiana and in the Rio Grande Valley. It also relates the various battles and skirmishes at Eagle Pass, Laredo, Carrizo (Zapata), Los Patricios, Las Rucias, the final Confederate expedition against Brownsville and the last Battle of the Civil War at Palmito Ranch. Thus,Vaqueros in Blue and Gray presents a saga of these brave people, their land, and their epic role in the American Civil War.

Onkel Tom's Hütte


Author: Harriet Beecher Stowe
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American fiction
Page: N.A
View: 2797
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Texas and Texans in the Civil War


Author: Ralph A. Wooster
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781571680426
Category: History
Page: 308
View: 461
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A well-researched volume, drawing from primary documents, official records, manuscripts and printed sources and works of other Texas and Civil War historians.

Polignac's Texas Brigade


Author: Alwyn Barr
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9780890968147
Category: History
Page: 72
View: 339
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Given in memory of Lt. Charles Britton Hudson, CSA & Sgt. William Henry Harrison Edge, CSA by Eugene Edge III.

The Journal of Military History


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: United States
Page: N.A
View: 6746
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New Mexico Historical Review


Author: Lansing Bartlett Bloom,Paul A. F. Walter
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Indians of North America
Page: N.A
View: 1329
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Brush Men and Vigilantes

Civil War Dissent in Texas
Author: David Pickering,Judith M. Falls
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585443956
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 7036
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As Charles Frazier's novel Cold Mountain dramatized, dissenters from the Confederacy lived in mortal danger throughout the South. In scattered pockets from the Carolinas to the frontier in Texas, these dissenters, or "brush men," often died at the hands of their own neighbors as a result of their belief in the Union or an unwillingness to preserve the slaveholding Confederacy. Brush Men and Vigilantes: Civil War Dissent in Texas tells the story of how dissent, fear, and economics developed into mob violence in the Sulphur Forks river valley northeast of Dallas. Authors David Pickering and Judy Falls have combed through court records, newspapers, letters, and other primary sources and have collected extended-family lore to relate the details of how vigilantes captured and killed more than a dozen men. Betrayed by links to a well-known Union guerilla, many dissenters were captured, tried in mock courts, and hanged. Still others met their death by sniper fire or private execution. Their story begins before the Civil War, as they describe the particular social and economic conditions that gave rise to tension and violence during the war. Four more chapters follow, each detailing the horror and hysteria that characterized post-Civil War Texas.

Directory of History Departments and Organizations in the United States and Canada


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7023
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The Civil War in Apacheland

Sergeant George Hand's diary : California, Arizona, West Texas, New Mexico, 1861-1864
Author: George O. Hand
Publisher: High Lonesome Books
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 215
View: 3769
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The Last Battle of the Civil War

Palmetto Ranch
Author: Jeffrey Wm Hunt
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292779658
Category: History
Page: 233
View: 3195
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More than two months after Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865, the New York Times reported a most surprising piece of news. On May 12-13, the last battle of the Civil War had been fought at the southernmost tip of Texas—resulting in a Confederate victory. Although Palmetto Ranch did nothing to change the war's outcome, it added the final irony to a conflict replete with ironies, unexpected successes, and lost opportunities. For these reasons, it has become both one of the most forgotten and most mythologized battles of the Civil War. In this book, Jeffrey Hunt draws on previously unstudied letters and court martial records to offer a full and accurate account of the battle of Palmetto Ranch. As he recreates the events of the fighting that pitted the United States' 62nd Colored Troops and the 34th Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry against Texas cavalry and artillery battalions commanded by Colonel John S. "Rip" Ford, Hunt lays to rest many misconceptions about the battle. In particular, he reveals that the Texans were fully aware of events in the East—and still willing to fight for Southern independence. He also demonstrates that, far from fleeing the battle in a panic as some have asserted, the African American troops played a vital role in preventing the Union defeat from becoming a rout.

Texas Civil War artifacts

a photographic guide to the physical culture of Texas Civil War soldiers
Author: Richard Mather Ahlstrom
Publisher: Univ of North Texas Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Antiques & Collectibles
Page: 546
View: 4583
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"One of the most popular literary subjects worldwide is the American Civil War. In addition to an enormous number of history buffs, there are tens of thousands of collectors of Civil War artifacts. In the last fifty years, several books have been written concerning the equipment associated with soldiers of specific Confederate states, but no book until now has ever chronicled the military equipment used by Texas soldiers. Texas Civil War Artifacts is the first comprehensive guide to the physical culture of Texas Civil War soldiers." "Texas military equipment differs in a number of ways from the equipment produced for the eastern Confederate states. Most of the Texas-produced equipment was blacksmithed, or local-artisan made, and in many cases featured the Lone Star as a symbol of Texas. Contemporary Civil War literature frequently mentions that most soldiers of Texas displayed the Lone Star somewhere on their uniform or equipment." "In this volume. Richard Mather Ahlstrom has photographed and described more than five hundred Texas-related artifacts. He shows the diverse use of the Lone Star on hat pins, waist-belt plates, buckles, horse equipment, side knives, buttons, and canteens. In addition, the weapons that Texans used in the Civil War are featured in chapters on the Tucker Sherrard and Colt pistols; shotguns, rifles, and muskets; and swords. Rounding out the volume are chapters on leather accouterments, uniforms and headgear, and a gallery of Texas soldiers in photographs." "This book will prove to be a valuable reference guide for Civil War collectors, historians, museum curators, re-enactors, and federal and state agencies."--BOOK JACKET.

Texas History for Kids

Lone Star Lives and Legends, with 21 Activities
Author: Karen Gibson
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1613749929
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 144
View: 5051
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Like everything in the Lone Star State, the history of Texas is larger than life. The flags of six different nations have flown over the state, which had a rich Native American heritage long before European explorers such as Cabeza de Vaca, Coronado, and La Salle ever arrived. The state was even its own republic, achieving independence from Mexico in 1836, yet joined the United States in 1845. Author Karen Bush Gibson tells the 500-year saga of this unique state, from the founding of the Spanish Missions to the victory at San Jacinto, from the Civil War to the first oil gusher at Spindletop, from the Great Storm that destroyed Galveston to the establishment of NASA's Mission Control in Houston. Texas History for Kids also includes 21 informative and fun activities to help readers better understand the state's culture, politics, and geography. Kids will recreate one of the six flags to fly over Texas, make castings of local wildlife tracks, design a ranch's branding iron, celebrate Juneteenth by reciting General Order Number 3, build a miniature Battle of Flowers float, and more. This valuable resource also includes a time line of significant events, a list of historic sites to visit or explore online, and Web resources for further study. Karen Bush Gibson is the author of Women in Space, Women Aviators, Native American History for Kids, and three dozen other books for young readers. She lives in Norman, Oklahoma.

Women in Civil War Texas

Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi
Author: Deborah M. Liles,Angela Boswell
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574416510
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 2963
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Women in Civil War Texas is the first book dedicated to the unique experiences of Texas women during the Civil War. It fills the literary void in Texas women’s history during this time, connects Texas women’s lives to southern women’s history, and shares the diversity of experiences of women in Texas during the Civil War. An introductory essay situates the anthology within both Civil War and Texas women’s history. Contributors explore Texas women and their vocal support for secession and in support of a war, coping with their husbands’ wartime absences, the importance of letter-writing as a means of connecting families, and how pro-Union sentiment caused serious difficulties for women. They also analyze the effects of ethnicity, focusing on African American, German, and Tejana women’s experiences. Finally, two essays examine the problem of refugee women in east Texas and the dangers facing western frontier women. These essays develop the historical understanding of what it meant to be a Texas woman during the Civil War and also contribute to a deeper understanding of the complexity of the war and its effects.