Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland

King James' treatise was written at a period of dramatic change in Scottish witchcraft and after a period of intense prosecution in Scotland. It was republished in England in the year of James' accession to the English throne.

Author: Lawrence Normand

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: UOM:39015053517382

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 128

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King James' treatise was written at a period of dramatic change in Scottish witchcraft and after a period of intense prosecution in Scotland. It was republished in England in the year of James' accession to the English throne.
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Witchcraft and belief in Early Modern Scotland

This pioneering collection concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting.

Author: J. Goodare

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230591400

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 402

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This pioneering collection concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.
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The Scottish Witch Hunt in Context

This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-16th century to the early 18th.

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719060249

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 453

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This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-16th century to the early 18th. It particularly emphasizes the later stages, since scholars are now as keen to explain why witch-hunting declined as why it occurred. There are studies of particular witchcraft panics, including a reassessment of the role of King James VI. The book thus covers a wide range of topics concerned with Scottish witch-hunting - and also places it in the context of other topics: gender relations, folklore, magic and healing, and moral regulation by church and state.
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Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

This important collection brings together both established figures and new researchers to offer fresh perspectives on the ever-controversial subject of the history of witchcraft.

Author: Jonathan Barry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521638755

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 214

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This important collection brings together both established figures and new researchers to offer fresh perspectives on the ever-controversial subject of the history of witchcraft. Using Keith Thomas's Religion and the Decline of Magic as a starting point, the contributors explore the changes of the last twenty-five years in the understanding of early modern witchcraft, and suggest new approaches, especially concerning the cultural dimensions of the subject. Witchcraft cases must be understood as power struggles, over gender and ideology as well as social relationships, with a crucial role played by alternative representations. Witchcraft was always a contested idea, never fully established in early modern culture but much harder to dislodge than has usually been assumed. The essays are European in scope, with examples from Germany, France, and the Spanish expansion into the New World, as well as a strong core of English material.
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The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America

A collection of essays from leading scholars in the field that collectively study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the ...

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199578160

Category: History

Page: 630

View: 492

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A collection of essays from leading scholars in the field that collectively study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas.
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Witchcraft and Masculinities in Early Modern Europe

Men – as accused witches, witch-hunters, werewolves and the demonically possessed – are the focus of analysis in this collection of essays by leading scholars of early modern European witchcraft.

Author: A. Rowlands

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230248373

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 623

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Men – as accused witches, witch-hunters, werewolves and the demonically possessed – are the focus of analysis in this collection of essays by leading scholars of early modern European witchcraft. The gendering of witch persecution and witchcraft belief is explored through original case-studies from England, Scotland, Italy, Germany and France.
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The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe

A long-standing favourite with students and lecturers alike, this new edition of The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe will be essential reading for those embarking on or looking to advance their studies of the history of witchcraft

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317412410

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 165

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The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe, now in its fourth edition, is the perfect resource for both students and scholars of the witch-hunts written by one of the leading names in the field. For those starting out in their studies of witch-beliefs and witchcraft trials, Brian Levack provides a concise survey of this complex and fascinating topic, while for more seasoned scholars the scholarship is brought right up to date. This new edition includes the most recent research on children, gender, male witches and demonic possession as well as broadening the exploration of the geographical distribution of witch prosecutions to include recent work on regions, cities and kingdoms enabling students to identify comparisons between countries. Now fully integrated with Brian Levack’s The Witchcraft Sourcebook, there are links to the sourcebook throughout the text, pointing students towards key primary sources to aid them in their studies. The two books are drawn together on a new companion website with supplementary materials for those wishing to advance their studies, including an extensive guide to further reading, a chronology of the history of witchcraft and an interactive map to show the geographical spread of witch-hunts and witch trials across Europe and North America. A long-standing favourite with students and lecturers alike, this new edition of The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe will be essential reading for those embarking on or looking to advance their studies of the history of witchcraft
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Witch Hunting in Scotland

Witch-Hunting in Scotland makes fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in witchcraft or in the political, legal and religious history of the early modern period.

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429603907

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 291

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Shortlisted for the 2008 Katharine Briggs Award Witch-Hunting in Scotland presents a fresh perspective on the trial and execution of the hundreds of women and men prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft, an offence that involved the alleged practice of maleficent magic and the worship of the devil, for inflicting harm on their neighbours and making pacts with the devil. Brian P. Levack draws on law, politics and religion to explain the intensity of Scottish witch-hunting. Topics discussed include: the distinctive features of the Scottish criminal justice system the use of torture to extract confessions the intersection of witch-hunting with local and national politics the relationship between state-building and witch-hunting and the role of James VI Scottish Calvinism and the determination of zealous Scottish clergy and magistrates to achieve a godly society. This original survey combines broad interpretations of the rise and fall of Scottish witchcraft prosecutions with detailed case studies of specific witch-hunts. Witch-Hunting in Scotland makes fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in witchcraft or in the political, legal and religious history of the early modern period.
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The Supernatural in Early Modern Scotland

This book is a collection of chapters on supernatural belief and practice in Scotland between 1500 and 1800. It deals with elite culture - from political prophecy to astrology, theology and poetic visions.

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher:

ISBN: 152613442X

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 175

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This book is about other worlds and the supernatural beings, from angels to fairies, that inhabited them. It is about divination, prophecy, visions and trances. And it is about the cultural, religious, political and social uses to which people in Scotland put these supernatural themes between 1500 and 1800. The supernatural consistently provided Scots with a way of understanding topics such as the natural environment, physical and emotional wellbeing, political events and visions of past and future. In exploring the early modern supernatural, the book has much to reveal about how men and women in this period thought about, debated and experienced the world around them. Comprising twelve chapters by an international range of scholars, The supernatural in early modern Scotland discusses both popular and elite understandings of the supernatural.
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Finding the Family in Medieval and Early Modern Scotland

Articles in the first section demonstrate the richness and variety of sources that exist for studies of the Scottish family. These essays clearly highlight the uniqueness, feasibility and value of family studies for pre-industrial Scotland.

Author: Elizabeth Ewan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351936439

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 829

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In this interdisciplinary collaboration, an international group of scholars have come together to suggest new directions for the study of the family in Scotland circa 1300-1750. Contributors apply tools from across a range of disciplines including art history, literature, music, gender studies, anthropology, history and religious studies to assess creatively the broad range of sources which inform our understanding of the pre-modern Scottish family. A central purpose of this volume is to encourage further studies in this area by highlighting the types of sources available, as well as actively engaging in broader historiographical debates to demonstrate how important and effective family studies are to advancing our understanding of the past. Articles in the first section demonstrate the richness and variety of sources that exist for studies of the Scottish family. These essays clearly highlight the uniqueness, feasibility and value of family studies for pre-industrial Scotland. The second and third sections expand upon the arguments made in part one to demonstrate the importance of family studies for engaging in broader historiographical issues. The focus of section two is internal to the family. These articles assess specific family roles and how they interact with broader social forces/issues. In the final section the authors explore issues of kinship ties (an issue particularly associated with popular images of Scotland) to examine how family networks are used as a vehicle for social organization.
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Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment

Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment represents the first in-depth investigation of Scottish witchcraft and witch belief post-1662, the period of supposed decline of such beliefs, ...

Author: Lizanne Henderson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137313249

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 906

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Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment represents the first in-depth investigation of Scottish witchcraft and witch belief post-1662, the period of supposed decline of such beliefs, an age which has been referred to as the 'long eighteenth century', coinciding with the Scottish Enlightenment. The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were undoubtedly a period of transition and redefinition of what constituted the supernatural, at the interface between folk belief and the philosophies of the learned. For the latter the eradication of such beliefs equated with progress and civilization but for others, such as the devout, witch belief was a matter of faith, such that fear and dread of witches and their craft lasted well beyond the era of the major witch-hunts. This study seeks to illuminate the distinctiveness of the Scottish experience, to assess the impact of enlightenment thought upon witch belief, and to understand how these beliefs operated across all levels of Scottish society.
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The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America

Scottish Tradition, 27 (2002), 7–22; Scott Moir, 'The Crucible: Witchcraft and the Experience of Family in Early Modern Scotland', in Elizabeth Ewan and Janay Nugent, eds, Finding the Family in Medieval and Early Modern Scotland ...

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191648830

Category: History

Page: 646

View: 669

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The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.
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Witchcraft and the Act of 1604

This volume examines both the events that shaped the Jacobean Witchcraft Act, and its subsequent impact on the culture and society of seventeenth-century England until its repeal in 1736.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047432944

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 657

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This volume examines both the events that shaped the Jacobean Witchcraft Act, and its subsequent impact on the culture and society of seventeenth-century England until its repeal in 1736.
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Scottish Witches and Witch Hunters

This book brings together twelve studies that collectively provide an overview of the main issues of live interest in Scottish witchcraft.

Author: J. Goodare

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137355942

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 380

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This book brings together twelve studies that collectively provide an overview of the main issues of live interest in Scottish witchcraft. As well as fresh studies of the well-established topic of witch-hunting, the book also launches an exploration of some of the more esoteric aspects of magical belief and practice.
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Heresy Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

See also Charlotte Wells, “Leeches on the Body Politic: Xenophobia and Witchcraft in Early Modern French Political ... For Scotland, Christina Larner's Enemies of God: The Witchhunt in Scotland (Baltimore, 1981), and Witchcraft and ...

Author: Gary K. Waite

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137218308

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 615

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In the fifteenth century many authorities did not believe Inquisitors' stories of a supposed Satanic witch sect. However, the religious conflict of the sixteenth-century Reformation - especially popular movements of reform and revolt - helped to create an atmosphere in which diabolical conspiracies (which swept up religious dissidents, Jews and magicians into their nets) were believed to pose a very real threat. Fear of the Devil and his followers inspired horrific incidents of judicially-approved terror in early modern Europe, leading after 1560 to the infamous witch hunts. Bringing together the fields of Reformation and witchcraft studies, this fascinating book reveals how the early modern period's religious conflicts led to widespread confusion and uncertainty. Gary K. Waite examines in-depth how church leaders dispelled rising religious doubt by persecuting heretics, and how alleged infernal plots, and witches who confessed to making a pact with the Devil, helped the authorities to reaffirm orthodoxy. Waite argues that it was only when the authorities came to terms with pluralism that there was a corresponding decline in witch panics.
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Witches of the North

Drawing on wide range of legal documents from the seventeenth-century, this book contains quantitative and qualitative analyses of witchcraft trials in Scotland and Finnmark, Norway.

Author: Liv Helene Willumsen

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004252929

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 217

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Drawing on wide range of legal documents from the seventeenth-century, this book contains quantitative and qualitative analyses of witchcraft trials in Scotland and Finnmark, Norway. Attention is drawn towards the voices of the accused persons, the witnesses, and the law.
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Godly Zeal and Furious Rage RLE Witchcraft

This work offers a conspectus of historical work on witchcraft in Europe, and shows how many trends converged to form the figure of the witch, and varied from one part of Europe to another.

Author: Geoffrey Robert Quaife

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136740251

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 718

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Though it is clearly an exceptionally important part of popular culture, witchcraft has generated a variety of often contradictory interpretations, starting from widely differing premises about the nature of witchcraft, its social role and the importance of higher theology as well as more popular beliefs. This work offers a conspectus of historical work on witchcraft in Europe, and shows how many trends converged to form the figure of the witch, and varied from one part of Europe to another.
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Agents of Witchcraft in Early Modern Italy and Denmark

Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic Series Editors: Jonathan Barry, Willem de Blécourt and Owen Davies ... Lauren Martin and Joyce Miller (editor)r WITCHCRAFT AND BELIEF IN EARLY MODERN SCOTLAND Jonathan Roper (editor)r ...

Author: L. Kallestrup

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137316974

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 904

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This book offers a comparison of lay and inquisitorial witchcraft prosecutions. In most of the early modern period, witchcraft jurisdiction in Italy rested with the Roman Inquisition, whereas in Denmark only the secular courts raised trials. Kallestrup explores the narratives of witchcraft as they were laid forward by people involved in the trials.
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The Witchcraft Sourcebook

This second edition includes an extended section on the witch trials in England, Scotland and New England, fully revised and updated introductions to the sources to include the latest scholarship and a short bibliography at the end of each ...

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317503576

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 986

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The Witchcraft Sourcebook, now in its second edition, is a fascinating collection of documents that illustrates the development of ideas about witchcraft from ancient times to the eighteenth century. Many of the sources come from the period between 1400 and 1750, when more than 100,000 people - most of them women - were prosecuted for witchcraft in Europe and colonial America. During these years the prominent stereotype of the witch as an evil magician and servant of Satan emerged. Catholics and Protestants alike feared that the Devil and his human confederates were destroying Christian society. Including trial records, demonological treatises and sermons, literary texts, narratives of demonic possession, and artistic depiction of witches, the documents reveal how contemporaries from various periods have perceived alleged witches and their activities. Brian P. Levack shows how notions of witchcraft have changed over time and considers the connection between gender and witchcraft and the nature of the witch's perceived power. This second edition includes an extended section on the witch trials in England, Scotland and New England, fully revised and updated introductions to the sources to include the latest scholarship and a short bibliography at the end of each introduction to guide students in their further reading. The Sourcebook provides students of the history of witchcraft with a broad range of sources, many of which have been translated into English for the first time, with commentary and background by one of the leading scholars in the field.
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