Women in Medicine in Nineteenth Century American Literature

From Poisoners to Doctors, Harriet Beecher Stowe to Theda Bara Sara L. Crosby ... in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (New York: Routledge, 2008).

Author: Sara L. Crosby

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319964638

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 257

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This book investigates how popular American literature and film transformed the poisonous woman from a misogynist figure used to exclude women and minorities from political power into a feminist hero used to justify the expansion of their public roles. Sara Crosby locates the origins of this metamorphosis in Uncle Tom’s Cabin where Harriet Beecher Stowe applied an alternative medical discourse to revise the poisonous Cassy into a doctor. The newly “medicalized” poisoner then served as a focal point for two competing narratives that envisioned the American nation as a multi-racial, egalitarian democracy or as a white and male supremacist ethno-state. Crosby tracks this battle from the heroic healers created by Stowe, Mary Webb, Oscar Micheaux, and Louisia May Alcott to the even more monstrous poisoners or “vampires” imagined by E. D. E. N. Southworth, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Theda Bara, Thomas Dixon, Jr., and D. W. Griffith.
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Invalid Women

There emerges from this work a striking sense of the changing meanings of female invalidism even as the conjunction of these terms has remained a constant in American cultural history. . .

Author: Diane Price Herndl

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807863909

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 486

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"A fine example of politically engaged literary criticism.--Belles Lettres "Price Herndl's compelling individual readings of works by major writers (Harriet Beecher Stowe, Hawthorne, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald) and minor ones complement her examination of germ theory, psychic and somatic cures, medicine's place in the rise of capitalism, and the cultural forms in which men and women used the trope of female illness.--Choice "A rich and provocative study of female illnesses and their textual representations. . . . A major contribution to the feminist agenda of literature and medicine.--Medical Humanities Review "[An] important book.--Nineteenth-Century Literature "[This] sophisticated new study . . . brings the best current strategies of a thoroughly historicized feminist literary criticism to bear on textual representations of female invalidism.--Feminist Studies "An outstanding study of the representation of female invalidism in American culture and literature. There emerges from this work a striking sense of the changing meanings of female invalidism even as the conjunction of these terms has remained a constant in American cultural history. . . . Moreover, Invalid Women provides fascinating readings of female illness in a variety of texts.--Gillian Brown, University of Utah "A provocative study based on imaginative historical research and very fine close readings. The book provides a useful American complement to Helena Michie's The Flesh Made Word and Margaret Homans's Bearing the World. It should prove enlightening and otherwise useful not just to scholars of American literature, but also to those engaged in American studies, feminist criticism and theory, women's studies, the sociology of medicine and illness, and the history of science and medicine.--Cynthia S. Jordan, Indiana University
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Making Sense of Self

Making Sense of Self is an historical analysis of the ideological content of a broad sample of late nineteenth-century popular advice literature concerning the body and the mind.

Author: Anita Clair Fellman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9781512801828

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 208

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Making Sense of Self is an historical analysis of the ideological content of a broad sample of late nineteenth-century popular advice literature concerning the body and the mind.
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Nineteenth Century American Women s Novels

Working with actual women's diaries and letters, Harris first shows what contemporary women sought from the books they read.

Author: Susan K. Harris

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 0521382882

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

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This study proposes interpretive strategies for nineteenth-century American women's novels. Harris contends that women in the nineteenth century read subversively, 'processing texts according to gender based imperatives'. Beginning with Susannah Rowson's best-selling seduction novel Charlotte Temple (1791), and ending with Willa Cather's O Pioneers! (1913), Harris scans white, middle-class women's writing throughout the nineteenth century. In the process she both explores reading behaviour and formulates a literary history for mainstream nineteenth-century American women's fiction. Through most of the twentieth century, women's novels of the earlier period have been denigrated as conventional, sentimental, and overwritten. Harris shows that these conditions are actually narrative strategies, rooted in cultural imperatives and, paradoxically, integral to the later development of women's texts that call for women's independence. Working with actual women's diaries and letters, Harris first shows what contemporary women sought from the books they read. She then applies these reading strategies to the most popular novels of the period, proving that even the most apparently retrograde demonstrate their heroines' abilities to create and control areas culturally defined as male.
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Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth century America

Also in 1907, the Alumnae Association of the Woman's Medical College of ... Friends, family, colleagues, and writers memorialized Mary PutnamJacobi in a ...

Author: Carla Jean Bittel

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807832837

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 328

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In the late nineteenth century, as Americans debated the "woman question," a battle over the meaning of biology arose in the medical profession. Some medical men claimed that women were naturally weak, that education would make them physically ill, and th
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Working Women in American Literature 1865 1950

Richard Volney Chase, The American Novel and Its Tradition (New York: Doubleday, 1957). 4. Donald Pizer, Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century ...

Author: Miriam S. Gogol

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781498546799

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 831

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This book examines working women in realistic and naturalistic literature. By addressing intersecting issues of race and class and including a study of domestic work, it contributes to the fields of multiculturalism, feminism, and working-class studies and to the increasing research interests in these areas.
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Profound Science and Elegant Literature

In Profound Science and Elegant Literature, Stephanie Browner charts this trajectory—and demonstrates at the same time that medicine's claims to somatic expertise and managerial talent did not go uncontested.

Author: Stephanie P. Browner

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812201482

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

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In 1847, at the first meeting of the American Medical Association, the newly elected president reminded his brethren that the profession, "once venerated," no longer earned homage "spontaneously and universally." The medical marketplace was crowded and competitive; state laws regulating medical practice had been repealed; and professional practitioners were often branded by their lay competitors as aristocrats bent on establishing a health care monopoly. By 1900, the battles were over, and, as the president of AMA had hoped, doctors were now widely venerated as men of profound science, elegant literature, polite accomplishments, and virtue. In fact, by 1900 the doctor had replaced the minister as the most esteemed professional in the United States; disease loomed larger than damnation; and science promised to manage the discord, differences, and excesses that democracy seemed to license. In Profound Science and Elegant Literature, Stephanie Browner charts this trajectory—and demonstrates at the same time that medicine's claims to somatic expertise and managerial talent did not go uncontested. Even as elite physicians founded institutions that made professional medicine's authority visible and legitimate, many others worried about the violence that might attend medicine's drive to mastery and science's equation of rational disinterest with white, educated masculinity. Reading fiction by a wide range of authors beside and against medical texts, Browner looks to the ways in which writers such as Hawthorne, Melville, Holmes, James, Chesnutt, and Jewett inventoried the collateral damage that might be done as science installed its peculiar understanding of the body. A work of impressive interdisciplinary reach, Profound Science and Elegant Literature documents both the extraordinary rise of professional medicine in the United States and the aesthetic imperative to make the body meaningful that led many American writers to resist the medicalized body.
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The Woman as Slave in Nineteenth Century American Social Movements

Gilman, Sander L. “Black Bodies, White Bodies: Toward an Iconography of Female Sexuality in Late Nineteenth-Century Art, Medicine, and Literature,” Critical ...

Author: Ana Stevenson

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030244675

Category: History

Page: 362

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This book is the first to develop a history of the analogy between woman and slave, charting its changing meanings and enduring implications across the social movements of the long nineteenth century. Looking beyond its foundations in the antislavery and women’s rights movements, this book examines the influence of the woman-slave analogy in popular culture along with its use across the dress reform, labor, suffrage, free love, racial uplift, and anti-vice movements. At once provocative and commonplace, the woman-slave analogy was used to exceptionally varied ends in the era of chattel slavery and slave emancipation. Yet, as this book reveals, a more diverse assembly of reformers both accepted and embraced a woman-as-slave worldview than has previously been appreciated. One of the most significant yet controversial rhetorical strategies in the history of feminism, the legacy of the woman-slave analogy continues to underpin the debates that shape feminist theory today.
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Danger and Vulnerability in Nineteenth century American Literature

minds and bodies of women” that law courts came to “recognize a right to recover ... and novel form subtended the growing attention to these legal cases.

Author: Jennifer Travis

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498563420

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 173

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Why, he asks, does it seem easier for humanity to imagine a future shaped by ever-deadlier accidents than a decent future? Danger and Vulnerability in Nineteenth Century American Literature; or, Crash and Burn American invites readers to examine the “threat horizon” through its nascent expression in literary and cultural history. Against the emerging rhetoric of danger in the long nineteenth century, this book examines how a vocabulary of vulnerability in the American imaginary promoted the causes of the structurally disempowered in new and surprising ways, often seizing vulnerability as the grounds for progressive insight. The texts at the heart of this study, from nineteenth-century sensation novels to early twentieth-century journalistic fiction, imagine spectacular collisions, terrifying conflagrations, and all manner of catastrophe, social, political, and environmental. Together they write against illusions of inviolability in a growing technological and managerial culture, and they imagine how the recognition of universal vulnerability may challenge normative representations of social, political, and economic marginality.
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Ecogothic in Nineteenth Century American Literature

... variously understood as being rooted in nineteenthcentury language theory (Roger), ... medicine (Brenzo, Medoro), the objectification of women (Person), ...

Author: Dawn Keetley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315464916

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

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First Published in 2017. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.
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Nineteenth Century American Women s Serial Novels

Panic Fiction: Women and Antebellum Economic Crisis. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press. Thompson, Graham. 2018. “The Seriality Dividend at American ...

Author: Dale M. Bauer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108486545

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 317

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Recovers the careers of four US women serial writers, and establishes a new archive for American literary studies.
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Out of the Dead House

Wells shows how these women learned to write, what they wrote, and how these texts were read. Out of the Dead House also documents the ways that women doctors influenced medical discourse during the formation of the modern profession.

Author: Susan Wells

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 9780299171735

Category: Medical

Page: 328

View: 461

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In the last decades of the nineteenth century, two thousand women physicians formed a significant and lively scientific community in the United States. Many were active writers; they participated in the development of medical record-keeping and research, and they wrote self-help books, social and political essays, fiction, and poetry. Out of the Dead House rediscovers the contributions these women made to the developing practice of medicine and to a community of women in science. Susan Wells combines studies of medical genres, such as the patient history or the diagnostic conversation, with discussions of individual writers. The women she discusses include Ann Preston, the first woman dean of a medical college; Hannah Longshore, a successful practitioner who combined conventional and homeopathic medicine; Rebecca Crumpler, the first African American woman physician to publish a medical book; and Mary Putnam Jacobi, writer of more than 180 medical articles and several important books. Wells shows how these women learned to write, what they wrote, and how these texts were read. Out of the Dead House also documents the ways that women doctors influenced medical discourse during the formation of the modern profession. They invented forms and strategies for medical research and writing, including methods of using survey information, taking patient histories, and telling case histories. Out of the Dead House adds a critical episode to the developing story of women as producers and critics of culture, including scientific culture.
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Representations of Death in Nineteenth century US Writing and Culture

... Turn: Suicide in Twentieth-Century American Literature by Women, diss., ... Medicine, Meaning, and Social Change in Nineteenth-Century America'.

Author: Lucy Elizabeth Frank

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754655288

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

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This collection traces the vicissitudes of the cultural preoccupation with death in nineteenth-century US writing and examines how mortality served paradoxically as a site on which identity and subjectivity were productively rethought. Topics include race- and gender-based investigations into the textual representation of death, imaginative constructions and re-constructions of social practice with regard to loss and memorialisation, and literary re-conceptualisations of death forced by personal and national trauma.
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Women and Health in America

Twice Other , Once Shy : NineteenthCentury Black Women Autobiographers and the ... Theorizing African - American Women Writers in the Antebellum North .

Author: Judith Walzer Leavitt

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299159647

Category: Social Science

Page: 692

View: 899

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In this thoroughly updated second edition, Judith Walzer Leavitt, a leading authority on the history of women's health issues, has collected thirty-five articles representing important scholarship in this once-neglected field. Timely and fascinating, this volume is organized chronologically and then by topic, covering studies of women and health in the colonial and revolutionary periods and the nineteenth century through the Civil War. The remainder of the book concentrates on the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries and addresses such controversial issues as body image and physical fitness, sexuality, fertility, abortion and birth control, childbirth and motherhood, mental illness, women's health care providers (midwives, nurses, physicians), and health reform and public health.
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Invalid Women

Figuring Feminine Illness in American Fiction and Culture, 1840-1940 Diane Price Herndl ... Women , Menstruation , and NineteenthCentury Medicine .

Author: Diane Price Herndl

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807844063

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 270

View: 602

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A provocative study based on imaginative historical research and very fine close readings. The book provides a useful American complement to Helena Michie's The Flesh Made Word and Margaret Homans's Bearing the World. It should prove enlightening and otherwise useful not just to scholars of American literature, but also to those engaged in American studies, feminist criticism and theory, women's studies, the sociology of medicine and illness, and the history of science and medicine. Cynthia S. Jordan, Indiana University
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The Oxford Handbook of American Literary Realism

Yale Medical Journal 5 (1898): 1–17. Browner, Stephanie. Profound Science and Elegant Literature: Imagining Doctors in Nineteenth Century America.

Author: Keith Newlin

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 9780190642891

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 736

View: 946

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"The Oxford Handbook of American Literary Realism offers 35 original essays of fresh interpretations of the artistic and political challenges of representing life accurately. Organized by topic and theme, essays draw upon recent scholarship in literary and cultural studies to offer an authoritative and in-depth reassessment of major and minor figures and the contexts that shaped their work. One set of essays explores realism's genesis and its connection to previous and subsequent movements. Others examine the inclusiveness of representation, the circulation of texts, and the aesthetic representation of science, time, space, and the subjects of medicine, the New Woman, and the middle class. Still others trace the connection to other arts--poetry, drama, illustration, photography, painting, and film--and to pedagogic issues in the teaching of realism"--
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Antislavery Discourse and Nineteenth Century American Literature

Sklar concludes that during the Progressive Era “gender—women's ... The movement to provide state resources for the medical care of mothers and children led ...

Author: J. Husband

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230105218

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 158

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Antislavery Discourse and Nineteenth-Century American Literature examines the relationship between antislavery texts and emerging representations of "free labor" in mid-nineteenth-century America. Husband shows how the images of families split apart by slavery, circulated primarily by women leaders, proved to be the most powerful weapon in the antislavery cultural campaign and ultimately turned the nation against slavery. She also reveals the ways in which the sentimental narratives and icons that constituted the "family protection campaign" powerfully influenced Americans sense of the role of government, gender, and race in industrializing America. Chapters examine the writings of ardent abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass, non-activist sympathizers, and those actively hostile to but deeply immersed in antislavery activism including Nathaniel Hawthorne.
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Separate Spheres No More

Gender Convergence in American Literature, 1830-1930 Monika Elbert ... Women Modern: Middle—Class Women and Health Reform in NineteenthCentury America.

Author: Monika Elbert

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817357795

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 319

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This collection examines the intersection of male and female spheres in American literature, arguing that more common ground exists than critics have previously recognized.
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